Displaying publications 1 - 20 of 79 in total

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  1. Zulazmi NA, Gopalsamy B, Farouk AA, Sulaiman MR, Bharatham BH, Perimal EK
    Fitoterapia, 2015 Sep;105:215-21.
    PMID: 26205045 DOI: 10.1016/j.fitote.2015.07.011
    Neuropathic pain is a chronic condition that is difficult to be treated. Current therapies available are either ineffective or non-specific thus requiring newer treatment approaches. In this study, we investigated the antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects of zerumbone, a bioactive sesquiterpene from Zingiber zerumbet in chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced neuropathic pain animal model. Our findings showed that single and repeated dose of intra-peritoneal administration of zerumbone (5, 10, 50, 100 mg/kg) significantly attenuated the CCI-induced neuropathic pain when evaluated using the electronic von Frey anesthesiometer, cold plate, Randall-Selitto analgesiometer and the Hargreaves plantar test. Zerumbone significantly alleviated tactile and cold allodynia as well as mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. Our findings are in comparison to the positive control drugs thatused gabapentin (20 mg/kgi.p.) and morphine (1 mg/kgi.p.). Together, these results showed that the systemic administration of zerumbone produced marked antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects in the CCI-induced neuropathic pain in mice and may serve as a potential lead compound for further analysis.
  2. Zulazmi NA, Gopalsamy B, Min JC, Farouk AA, Sulaiman MR, Bharatham BH, et al.
    Molecules, 2017 Mar 30;22(4).
    PMID: 28358309 DOI: 10.3390/molecules22040555
    The present study investigates the involvement of the l-arginine-Nitric Oxide-cGMP-K⁺ ATP pathways responsible for the action of anti-allodynic and antihyperalgesic activities of zerumbone in chronic constriction injury (CCI) induced neuropathic pain in mice. The role of l-arginine-NO-cGMP-K⁺ was assessed by the von Frey and the Randall-Selitto tests. Both allodynia and hyperalgesia assessments were carried out on the 14th day post CCI, 30 min after treatments were given for each respective pathway. Anti-allodynic and antihyperalgesic effects of zerumbone (10 mg/kg, i.p) were significantly reversed by the pre-treatment of l-arginine (10 mg/kg), 1H [1,2,4]Oxadiazole[4,3a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), a soluble guanosyl cyclase blocker (2 mg/kg i.p.) and glibenclamide (ATP-sensitive potassium channel blocker) (10 mg/kg i.p.) (p < 0.05). Taken together, these results indicate that systemic administration of zerumbone produces significant anti-allodynic and antihyperalgesic activities in neuropathic pain in mice possibly due to involvement of the l-arginine-NO-cGMP-PKG-K⁺ ATP channel pathways in CCI model.
  3. Zakaria ZA, Hussain MK, Mohamad AS, Abdullah FC, Sulaiman MR
    Biol Res Nurs, 2012 Jan;14(1):90-7.
    PMID: 21278166 DOI: 10.1177/1099800410395378
    Ficus deltoidea (Family Moraceae) leaves have been used traditionally by the Malays to treat ailments such as wounds, sores, and rheumatism. The aim of the present study was to determine the anti-inflammatory activity of the aqueous extract of F. deltoidea leaf (FDA) using acute and chronic inflammatory models. FDA, in the doses of 30, 100, and 300 mg/kg, was administered intraperitoneally in rats (n = 6) before the animals were subjected to the carrageenan-induced paw edema test, cotton pellet-induced granuloma test, and formalin test. The first two tests represent acute and chronic models of inflammation, respectively. The first and second phases of the formalin test represent neurogenic pain and inflammatory-mediated pain, respectively; thus, only the second phase was measured in the present study. Results showed that FDA exerted significant (p < .05) anti-inflammatory activity in all assays, with dose-response effects seen in the paw edema and formalin tests. In conclusion, the leaf of F. deltoidea possesses anti-inflammatory activity against acute and chronic inflammatory responses and against pain-associated inflammatory response. These findings justify the traditional uses of F. deltoidea leaves for treatment of inflammatory-mediated ailments.
  4. Zakaria ZA, Rofiee MS, Somchit MN, Zuraini A, Sulaiman MR, Teh LK, et al.
    PMID: 21318140 DOI: 10.1155/2011/142739
    The present study aims to determine the hepatoprotective effect of MARDI-produced virgin coconut oils, prepared by dried- or fermented-processed methods, using the paracetamol-induced liver damage in rats. Liver injury induced by 3 g/kg paracetamol increased the liver weight per 100 g bodyweight indicating liver damage. Histological observation also confirms liver damage indicated by the presence of inflammations and necrosis on the respective liver section. Interestingly, pretreatment of the rats with 10, but not 1 and 5, mL/kg of both VCOs significantly (P < .05) reduced the liver damage caused by the administration of paracetamol, which is further confirmed by the histological findings. In conclusion, VCO possessed hepatoprotective effect that requires further in-depth study.
  5. Zakaria ZA, Mohamed AM, Jamil NS, Rofiee MS, Hussain MK, Sulaiman MR, et al.
    Am. J. Chin. Med., 2011;39(1):183-200.
    PMID: 21213408
    The in vitro antiproliferative and antioxidant activities of the aqueous, chloroform and methanol extracts of Muntingia calabura leaves were determined in the present study. Assessed using the 3,(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) (MTT) assay, the aqueous and methanol extracts of M. calabura inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7, HeLa, HT-29, HL-60 and K-562 cancer cells while the chloroform extract only inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7, HeLa, HL-60 and K-562 cancer cells. Interestingly, all extracts of M. calabura, which failed to inhibit the MDA-MB-231 cells proliferation, did not inhibit the proliferation of 3T3 (normal) cells, indicating its safety. All extracts (20, 100 and 500 μg/ml) were found to possess antioxidant activity when tested using the DPPH radical scavenging and superoxide scavenging assays with the methanol, followed by the aqueous and chloroform, extract exhibiting the highest antioxidant activity in both assays. The total phenolic content for the aqueous, methanol and chloroform extracts were 2970.4 ± 6.6, 1279.9 ± 6.1 and 2978.1 ± 4.3 mg/100 g gallic acid, respectively. In conclusion, the M. calabura leaves possess potential antiproliferative and antioxidant activities that could be attributed to its high content of phenolic compounds, and thus, needs to be further explored.
  6. Zakaria ZA, Mohamad AS, Ahmad MS, Mokhtar AF, Israf DA, Lajis NH, et al.
    Biol Res Nurs, 2011 Oct;13(4):425-32.
    PMID: 21112917 DOI: 10.1177/1099800410386590
    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been widely used for the treatment of inflammation. However, despite their effectiveness, most NSAIDs cause various side effects that negatively affect the management of inflammation and, in part, pain. Thus, there is a need to search for new anti-inflammatory agents with few, or no, side effects. Natural products of plant, animal, or microorganism origin have been good sources of new bioactive compounds. The present study was carried out to evaluate the acute and chronic anti-inflammatory activities of the essential oil of the rhizomes of Zingiber zerumbet (Zingiberaceae) using the carrageenan-induced paw edema and cotton pellet-induced granuloma tests, respectively. The effect of the essential oil on inflammatory- and noninflammatory-mediated pain was also assessed using the formalin test. Essential oil of Z. zerumbet, at doses of 30, 100, and 300 mg/kg, was administered intraperitoneally to rats. The substance exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity both in acute and chronic animal models. The essential oil also inhibited inflammatory- and noninflammatory-mediated pain when assessed using the formalin test. In conclusion, the essential oil of Z. zerumbet possessed anti-inflammatory activity, in addition to its antinociceptive activity, which may explain its traditional uses to treat inflammatory-related ailments.
  7. Zakaria ZA, Mohamad AS, Chear CT, Wong YY, Israf DA, Sulaiman MR
    Med Princ Pract, 2010;19(4):287-94.
    PMID: 20516705 DOI: 10.1159/000312715
    The present study was carried out to determine the antiinflammatory and antinociceptive activities of a methanol extract of Zingiber zerumbet rhizomes (MEZZ) using various experimental model systems.
  8. Zakaria ZA, Mat Jais AM, Goh YM, Sulaiman MR, Somchit MN
    Clin. Exp. Pharmacol. Physiol., 2007 Mar;34(3):198-204.
    PMID: 17250639
    1. The present study was performed in order to determine the amino acid and fatty acid composition of an aqueous extract of the freshwater fish Channa striatus, obtained by soaking (1:2, w/v) fresh fillets overnight in a chloroform:methanol (2:1, v/v) solvent, to elucidate the mechanism responsible for its antinociceptive activity and to clarify the relationship between the presence of the amino and fatty acids and the expected activity. 2. The aqueous extract was found to contain all amino acids with the major amino acids glycine, alanine, lysine, aspartic acid and proline making up 35.77 +/- 0.58, 10.19 +/- 1.27, 9.44 +/- 0.56, 8.53 +/- 1.15 and 6.86 +/- 0.78% of the total protein, respectively. 3. In addition, the aqueous extract was found to have a high palmitic acid (C16:0) content, which contributed approximately 35.93 +/- 0.63% to total fatty acids. The other major fatty acids in the aqueous extract were oleic acid (C18:1), stearic acid (C18:0), linoleic acid (C18:2) and arachidonic acid (C20:4), contributing 22.96 +/- 0.40, 15.31 +/- 0.33, 11.45 +/- 0.31 and 7.44 +/- 0.83% of total fatty acids, respectively. 4. Furthermore, the aqueous extract was demonstrated to possess concentration-dependent antinociceptive activity, as expected, when assessed using the abdominal constriction test in mice. 5. It is concluded that the aqueous extract of C. striatus contains all the important amino acids, but only some of the important fatty acids, which are suggested to play a key role in the observed antinociceptive activity of the extract, as well as in the traditionally claimed wound healing properties of the extract.
  9. Zakaria ZA, Raden Mohd Nor RN, Hanan Kumar G, Abdul Ghani ZD, Sulaiman MR, Rathna Devi G, et al.
    Can. J. Physiol. Pharmacol., 2006 Dec;84(12):1291-9.
    PMID: 17487238
    The present study was carried out to establish the antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic properties of the aqueous extract of Melastoma malabathricum leaves in experimental animals. The antinociceptive activity was measured using abdominal constriction, hot-plate, and formalin tests, whereas the anti-inflammatory and antipyretic activities were measured using carrageenan-induced paw edema and brewer's yeast-induced pyrexia tests, respectively. The extract, which was obtained after soaking the air-dried leaves in distilled water for 72 h and then preparing in concentrations of 10%, 50%, and 100% (v/v), was administered subcutaneously 30 min prior to subjection to the above mentioned assays. At all concentrations tested, the extract was found to exhibit significant (P < 0.05) antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic activities in a concentration-independent manner. Our findings that the aqueous extract of M. malabathricum possesses antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic activities supports previous claims on its traditional uses to treat various ailments.
  10. Zakaria ZA, Sulaiman MR, Jais AM, Somchit MN, Jayaraman KV, Balakhrisnan G, et al.
    Fundam Clin Pharmacol, 2006 Aug;20(4):365-72.
    PMID: 16867020
    The present study was carried out to investigate on the possible involvement of L-arginine/nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (L-arginine/NO/cGMP) pathway in the aqueous extract of Muntingia calabura (AEMC) leaves antinociception in mice assessed by abdominal constriction test. The AEMC, obtained by soaking the dried leaves in distilled water (DH(2)O) (1 : 2; w/v) for 24 h, was prepared in concentrations of 10%, 50% and 100% that were approximately equivalent to doses of 27, 135 and 270 mg/kg, and administered subcutaneously (s.c.) 5 min after pre-treatment (s.c.) of mice with DH(2)O, L-arginine (20 mg/kg), N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine acetate (L-NMMA; 20 mg/kg), N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl esters (L-NAME; 20 mg/kg), methylene blue (MB) (20 mg/kg), respectively. The AEMC was found to exhibit a concentration-dependent antinociception after pre-challenge with DH(2)O. Interestingly, pre-treatment with L-arginine was found to block significantly (P < 0.05) the AEMC antinociception but only at the highest concentration (100%) of AEMC used. On the other hand, pre-treatment with L-NAME was found to significantly (P < 0.05) enhance the low concentration but inhibit the high concentration AEMC antinociception. MB was found to significantly (P < 0.05) enhance AEMC antinociception at all concentrations used. Except for the higher concentration of AEMC used, co-treatment with L-NAME was found to insignificantly and significantly (P < 0.05) reverse the L-arginine effect when given alone or with low concentration AEMC, respectively. In addition, co-treatment with MB significantly (P < 0.05) reversed the L-arginine effect when given alone or with 10% concentration AEMC but failed to affect the activity of the rest of concentrations used. As a conclusion, this study has demonstrated the involvement of L-arginine/NO/cGMP pathway in AEMC antinociception.
  11. Zakaria ZA, Abdul Ghani ZD, Raden Mohd Nor RN, Gopalan HK, Sulaiman MR, Abdullah FC
    Yakugaku Zasshi, 2006 Nov;126(11):1197-203.
    PMID: 17077622
    The present study was carried out to establish the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory properties of Dicranopteris linearis leaves chloroform extract in experimental animals. The antinociceptive activity was measured using the abdominal constriction, formalin and hot plate tests, while the anti-inflammatory activity was measured using the carrageenan-induced paw edema. The extract, obtained after 72 h soaking of the air-dried leaves in chloroform followed by evaporation under vacuo (40 degrees C) to dryness, was dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide to the doses of 20, 100 and 200 mg/kg and administered subcutaneously 30 min prior to subjection to the above mentioned assays. The extract, at all doses used, was found to exhibit significant (p<0.05) antinociceptive activity in a dose-dependent manner. However, the significant (p<0.05) anti-inflammatory activity observed occur in a dose-independent manner. As a conclusion, the chloroform extract of D. linearis possesses antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activity and thus justify its traditional uses by the Malays to treat various ailments.
  12. Zakaria ZA, Gopalan HK, Zainal H, Mohd Pojan NH, Morsid NA, Aris A, et al.
    Yakugaku Zasshi, 2006 Nov;126(11):1171-8.
    PMID: 17077618
    AIM: The present study was carried out to evaluate the antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic effects of chloroform extract of Solanum nigrum leaves using various animal models.

    METHODS: The extract was prepared by soaking (1:20; w/v) the air-dried powdered leaves (20 g) in chloroform for 72 hrs followed by evaporation (40 degrees C) under reduced pressure to dryness (1.26 g) and then dissolved (1:50; w/v) in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). The supernatant, considered as the stock solution with dose of 200 mg/kg, was diluted using DMSO to 20 and 100 mg/kg, and all doses were administered (s.c.; 10 ml/kg) in mice/rats 30 min prior to tests.

    RESULTS: The extract exhibited significant (p<0.05) antinociceptive activity when assessed using the abdominal constriction, hot plate and formalin tests. The extract also produced significant (p<0.05) anti-inflammatory and antipyretic activities when assessed using the carrageenan-induced paw edema and brewer's yeast-induced pyrexia tests. Overall, the activities occurred in a dose-independent manner.

    CONCLUSION: The present study demonstrated that the lipid-soluble extract of S. nigrum leaves possessed antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory and anti-pyretic properties and confirmed the traditional claims.

  13. Zakaria ZA, Hassan MH, Nurul Aqmar MN, Abd Ghani M, Mohd Zaid SN, Sulaiman MR, et al.
    Methods Find Exp Clin Pharmacol, 2007 Oct;29(8):515-20.
    PMID: 18040526
    This study was carried out in mice to determine the nonopioid receptor signaling pathway(s) that might modulate the antinociceptive activity of the aqueous and chloroform extracts of Muntingia calabura (M. calabura) leaves, using the hot-plate test. The leaves of M. calabura were sequentially soaked [1:2 (w/v); 72 h] in distilled water (dH(2)O) and chloroform. The 50% concentration extracts were selected for this study based on the plant's previously established antinociceptive profiles. The mice (n = 7) were pretreated (s.c.) for 10 min with the selected nonopioid receptor antagonists, followed by the (s.c.) administration of the respective extract. The latency of discomfort was recorded at the interval time of 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 h after the extract administration. The 5 mg/kg atropine, 10 mg/kg phenoxybenzamine, 10 mg/kg yohimbine, 10 mg/kg pindolol, 1 mg/kg haloperidol and 10 mg/kg bicuculline caused significant (p < 0.05) reduction in the aqueous extract-induced antinociceptive activity. The 10 mg/kg phenoxybenzamine, 10 mg/kg yohimbine, 10 mg/kg pindolol and 10 mg/kg bicuculline caused significant (p < 0.05) reduction in the chloroform extract-induced antinociceptive activity. In conclusion, the central antinociceptive activity of M. calabura leaves appears to be involved in the modulation of various nonopioid receptor signaling pathways. Its aqueous extract antinociceptive activity is mediated via modulation of the muscarinic, alpha(1)-adrenergic, alpha(2)-adrenergic, beta-adrenergic, dopaminergic and GABAergic receptors, while its chloroform extract activity is mediated via modulation of the alpha(1)-adrenergic, alpha(2)-adrenergic, beta-adrenergic and GABAergic receptors.
  14. Zakaria ZA, Wen LY, Abdul Rahman NI, Abdul Ayub AH, Sulaiman MR, Gopalan HK
    Med Princ Pract, 2007;16(6):443-9.
    PMID: 17917444
    The present study was carried out to determine the antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic activities of the aqueous extract of Bauhinia purpurea leaves using animal models.
  15. Zakaria ZA, Sulaiman MR, Gopalan HK, Abdul Ghani ZD, Raden Mohd Nor RN, Mat Jais AM, et al.
    Yakugaku Zasshi, 2007 Feb;127(2):359-65.
    PMID: 17268156
    The antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory properties of Corchorus capsularis leaves chloroform extract were investigated in experimental animal models. The antinociceptive activity was measured using the writhing, hot plate and formalin tests, while the anti-inflammatory activity was measured using the carrageenan-induced paw edema test. The extract, obtained after 72 h soaking of the air-dried leaves in chloroform followed by in vacuo evaporation to dryness, was weighed and prepared by serial dilution in DMSO in the doses of 20, 100 and 200 mg/kg. The extract was administered (s.c.) 30 min prior to subjection to the respective assays. The extract was found to exhibit significant (p < 0.05) antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities. As a conclusion, the present study confirmed the traditional claims of using C. capsularis to treat various ailments related to inflammation and pain.
  16. Zakaria ZA, Mustapha S, Sulaiman MR, Mat Jais AM, Somchit MN, Abdullah FC
    Med Princ Pract, 2007;16(2):130-6.
    PMID: 17303949
    The present study was carried out to investigate the antinociceptive activity of the aqueous extract of Muntingia calabura (MCAE) leaves and to determine the effect of temperature and the involvement of the opioid receptor on the said activity using the abdominal constriction test (ACT) and hot-plate test (HPT) in mice.
  17. Zakaria ZA, Safarul M, Valsala R, Sulaiman MR, Fatimah CA, Somchit MN, et al.
    PMID: 16133487
    A series of preliminary studies was carried out to evaluate the antinociceptive (pain relief) activity of the aqueous extract of Corchorus olitorius L. leaves (COAE) and to determine the influence of temperature and opioid receptors on COAE activity using the abdominal constriction and hot plate tests in mice. COAE, at concentrations of 10, 25, 50, 75, and 100%, showed both peripheral and central antinociception that are non-concentration- and concentration-dependent respectively. The peripheral activity was clearly observed at a concentration of 25% and diminished at a concentration of 100%, while the central activity was observed at all the concentrations of COAE used. Furthermore, the insignificant results obtained indicated that this peripheral activity (at concentrations of 25 and 50%) was comparable to that of morphine (0.8 mg/kg). Pre-heating COAE at a temperature of 80 degrees C and 100 degrees C, or 60 degrees C and 80 degrees C was found to enhance its peripheral and central antinociception respectively. Pre-treatment with naloxone (10 mg/kg), a general opioid receptor antagonist, for 5 min, followed by COAE, was found to completely block its peripheral, but not central, antinociceptive activity. Based on this observation, we conclude that the antinociceptive activity exhibited by C. olitorius is enhanced by the increase in temperature and may be mediated peripherally, but not centrally, at least in part, via an opioid receptor.
  18. Zakaria ZA, Sulaiman MR, Mat Jais AM, Somchit MN
    Can. J. Physiol. Pharmacol., 2005 Jul;83(7):635-42.
    PMID: 16091789
    The effects of an aqueous supernatant of haruan (ASH) (Channa striatus) fillet extract on various antinociception receptor system activities were examined using a mouse abdominal-constriction model. Mice that were pretreated with distilled water, s.c., followed 10 min later by administration of 25%, 50%, and 100% concentration ASH, s.c., produced a significant concentration-dependent antinociceptive activity (p < 0.001). Pretreatment with naloxone (0.3, 1.0, and 3.0 mg/kg body mass), 10 min before ASH administration, failed to block the extract antinociception. Pretreatment of the 100% concentration ASH with mecamylamine (5 mg/kg), pindolol (10 mg/kg), and haloperidol (1 mg/kg) also did not cause any significant change in its antinociception. However, pretreatment with atropine (5 mg/kg), bicuculline (10 mg/kg), phenoxybenzamine (10 mg/kg), and methysergide (5 mg/kg) were found to reverse ASH antinociception. Based on the above findings, the ASH is suggested to contain different types of bioactive compounds that act synergistically on muscarinic, GABAA, alpha-adrenergic, and serotonergic receptor systems to produce the observed antinociception.
  19. Zakaria ZA, Sulaiman MR, Somchit MN, Jais AM, Ali DI
    J Pharm Pharm Sci, 2005;8(2):199-206.
    PMID: 16124931
    To determine the involvement of nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO/cGMP) pathway in aqueous supernatant of haruan (Channa striatus) fillet (ASH) antinociception using the acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction test.
  20. Zakaria ZA, Patahuddin H, Mohamad AS, Israf DA, Sulaiman MR
    J Ethnopharmacol, 2010 Mar 2;128(1):42-8.
    PMID: 20035852 DOI: 10.1016/j.jep.2009.12.021
    Piper sarmentosum (Piperaceae) is a medicinal plant traditionally used by the Malays to treat headaches, toothaches, coughs, asthma and fever.
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