Displaying publications 1 - 20 of 58 in total

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  1. Flaherty GT, Leong SW, Finn Y, Sulaiman LH, Noone C
    J Travel Med, 2020 Jul 07.
    PMID: 32634210 DOI: 10.1093/jtm/taaa110
    BACKGROUND: Little is known about the awareness of travellers with diabetes about the health effects of international travel. This study aimed to design and validate a questionnaire to examine the travel health knowledge, attitudes and practices of people living with type 1 diabetes.

    METHODS: A set of 74 items based on a conceptual framework analysis underwent revision and its content validity was established. Items were grouped into three domains. A development study was conducted to establish evidence regarding their factorial structure. A construct validation study was then conducted in which the retained items were tested in an independent sample using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA).

    RESULTS: Four factors emerged from our development study and were labelled as Pre-travel Preparation-Insect Bites, Pre-travel Preparation-Consultation, Insulin and Glycaemic Control, and Travel Risk Behaviour. A CFA confirmed the factorial structure identified in the development study in an independent sample. Each factor loading had a significant (p 

  2. Wong J, Abdul Aziz ABZ, Chaw L, Mahamud A, Griffith MM, Ying-Ru LO, et al.
    J Travel Med, 2020 May 05.
    PMID: 32365178 DOI: 10.1093/jtm/taaa066
    We report early findings from COVID-19 cases in Brunei suggesting a remarkably high proportion of asymptomatic (12%) and presymptomatic (30%) cases. This proportion was even higher in imported cases. These have implications for measures to prevent onward local transmission and should prompt reconsideration of current testing protocols and safe de-escalation of social distancing measures.
  3. Chang L, Lim BCW, Flaherty GT, Torresi J
    J Travel Med, 2019 Sep 02;26(6).
    PMID: 31066446 DOI: 10.1093/jtm/taz034
    BACKGROUND: With the advent of highly active antiretroviral drugs for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) it has become possible for people with HIV to travel to destinations that may place them at risk of a number of infectious diseases. Prevention of infections by vaccination is therefore of paramount importance for these travellers. However, vaccine responsiveness in HIV-positive individuals is not infrequently reduced compared to HIV-negative individuals. An understanding of the expected immune responses to vaccines in HIV-positive travellers is therefore important in planning the best approach to a pretravel consultation.

    METHODS: A PubMed search was performed on HIV or acquired immune deficiency syndrome together with a search for specific vaccines. Review of the literature was performed to develop recommendations on vaccinations for HIV-positive travellers to high-risk destinations.

    RESULTS: The immune responses to several vaccines are reduced in HIV-positive people. In the case of vaccines for hepatitis A, hepatitis B, influenza, pneumococcus, meningococcus and yellow fever there is a good body of data in the literature showing reduced immune responsiveness and also to help guide appropriate vaccination strategies. For other vaccines like Japanese encephalitis, rabies, typhoid fever, polio and cholera the data are not as robust; however, it is still possible to gain some understanding of the reduced responses seen with these vaccines.

    CONCLUSION: This review provides a summary of the immunological responses to commonly used vaccines for the HIV-positive travellers. This information will help guide travel medicine practitioners in making decisions about vaccination and boosting of travellers with HIV.

  4. Flaherty GT, Geoghegan R, Brown IG, Finucane FM
    J Travel Med, 2019 05 10;26(3).
    PMID: 30855079 DOI: 10.1093/jtm/taz018
    BACKGROUND: It is unknown whether obesity is a barrier to international travel. The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe the travel experiences of a cohort of severely obese individuals attending a hospital-based bariatric service, to identify their perceived barriers to travel and to generate recommendations that address the needs of severely obese individuals.

    METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with severely obese patients attending a regional, structured, multidisciplinary lifestyle modification programme. Coding and thematic analysis of the transcripts were completed by three independent researchers. A thematic analysis was performed based on examination of the transcribed interviews. Demographic and clinical data such as gender, age and body mass index were also recorded.

    RESULTS: Twelve patients (six males), with a mean age of 54 ± 5.98 years and a mean body mass index of 46.2 ± 8.2 kg/m2, agreed to semi-structured interviews (14-52-minute duration). The principal themes emerging from the interviews included obese air traveller embarrassment, physical discomfort on commercial flights, perceived weight bias, challenges in accessing hotel rooms, heat intolerance in warm climates, restricted leisure travel activities and medical co-morbidities. Most of the interviewees perceived a health benefit to travel but regarded obesity as a significant barrier to international travel.

    CONCLUSION: These findings highlight the limitations experienced by obese travellers when engaging in international travel. Our results may inform the pre-travel health advice given to obese travellers. They might also serve to raise awareness among operators within the travel industry of the difficulties travellers with severe obesity face.

  5. Lally L, McCabe E, Flaherty GT
    J Travel Med, 2019 Jan 01;26(1).
    PMID: 30476182 DOI: 10.1093/jtm/tay135
  6. Pereira RT, Malone CM, Flaherty GT
    J Travel Med, 2018 06 01;25(1).
    PMID: 29924349 DOI: 10.1093/jtm/tay042
    Background: Medical tourism has witnessed significant growth in recent years. The emerging trend towards international travel for cosmetic surgical interventions has not previously been reviewed. The current review aims to critically address the scale and impact of cosmetic surgical tourism and to delineate the complication profile of this form of medical tourism.

    Methods: Articles published in the English language on the PubMed database that were relevant to surgical tourism and the complications of elective surgical procedures abroad were examined. Reference lists of articles identified were further scrutinized. The search terms used included combinations of 'surgery abroad', 'cosmetic surgery abroad', 'cosmetic surgery tourism', 'cosmetic surgery complications' and 'aesthetic tourism'.

    Results: This article critically reviews the epidemiology of cosmetic surgical tourism and its associated economic factors. Surgical complications of selected procedures, including perioperative complications, are described. The implications for travel medicine practice are considered and recommendations for further research are proposed.

    Conclusion: This narrative literature review focuses on the issues affecting travellers who obtain cosmetic surgical treatment overseas. There is a lack of focus in the travel medicine literature on the non-surgery-related morbidity of this special group of travellers. Original research exploring the motivation and pre-travel preparation, including the psychological counselling, of cosmetic surgical tourists is indicated.

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