Displaying publications 1 - 20 of 51 in total

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  1. Flaherty GT, Rossanese A, Steffen R, Torresi J
    J Travel Med, 2018 01 01;25(1).
    PMID: 30239856 DOI: 10.1093/jtm/tay088
  2. Nakayama E, Tajima S, Kotaki A, Shibasaki KI, Itokawa K, Kato K, et al.
    J Travel Med, 2018 01 01;25(1).
    PMID: 29394382 DOI: 10.1093/jtm/tax072
    Background: Due to the huge 2-way human traffic between Japan and Chikungunya (CHIK) fever-endemic regions, 89 imported cases of CHIK fever were confirmed in Japan from January 2006 to June 2016. Fifty-four of 89 cases were confirmed virologically and serologically at the National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Japan and we present the demographic profiles of the patients and the phylogenetic features of 14 CHIK virus (CHIKV) isolates.

    Methods: Patients were diagnosed with CHIK fever by a combination of virus isolation, viral RNA amplification, IgM antibody-, IgG antibody-, and/or neutralizing antibody detection. The whole-genome sequences of the CHIKV isolates were determined by next-generation sequencing.

    Results: Prior to 2014, the source countries of the imported CHIK fever cases were limited to South and Southeast Asian countries. After 2014, when outbreaks occurred in the Pacific and Caribbean Islands and Latin American countries, there was an increase in the number of imported cases from these regions. A phylogenetic analysis of 14 isolates revealed that four isolates recovered from three patients who returned from Sri Lanka, Malaysia and Angola, belonged to the East/Central/South African genotype, while 10 isolates from 10 patients who returned from Indonesia, the Philippines, Tonga, the Commonwealth of Dominica, Colombia and Cuba, belonged to the Asian genotype.

    Conclusion: Through the phylogenetic analysis of the isolates, we could predict the situations of the CHIK fever epidemics in Indonesia, Angola and Cuba. Although Japan has not yet experienced an autochthonous outbreak of CHIK fever, the possibility of the future introduction of CHIKV through an imported case and subsequent local transmission should be considered, especially during the mosquito-active season. The monitoring and reporting of imported cases will be useful to understand the situation of the global epidemic, to increase awareness of and facilitate the diagnosis of CHIK fever, and to identify a future CHIK fever outbreak in Japan.

  3. Pereira RT, Malone CM, Flaherty GT
    J Travel Med, 2018 06 01;25(1).
    PMID: 29924349 DOI: 10.1093/jtm/tay042
    Background: Medical tourism has witnessed significant growth in recent years. The emerging trend towards international travel for cosmetic surgical interventions has not previously been reviewed. The current review aims to critically address the scale and impact of cosmetic surgical tourism and to delineate the complication profile of this form of medical tourism.

    Methods: Articles published in the English language on the PubMed database that were relevant to surgical tourism and the complications of elective surgical procedures abroad were examined. Reference lists of articles identified were further scrutinized. The search terms used included combinations of 'surgery abroad', 'cosmetic surgery abroad', 'cosmetic surgery tourism', 'cosmetic surgery complications' and 'aesthetic tourism'.

    Results: This article critically reviews the epidemiology of cosmetic surgical tourism and its associated economic factors. Surgical complications of selected procedures, including perioperative complications, are described. The implications for travel medicine practice are considered and recommendations for further research are proposed.

    Conclusion: This narrative literature review focuses on the issues affecting travellers who obtain cosmetic surgical treatment overseas. There is a lack of focus in the travel medicine literature on the non-surgery-related morbidity of this special group of travellers. Original research exploring the motivation and pre-travel preparation, including the psychological counselling, of cosmetic surgical tourists is indicated.

  4. Flaherty GT, Caumes E
    J Travel Med, 2018 01 01;25(1).
    PMID: 29635642 DOI: 10.1093/jtm/tay019
    Background: Traumatic deaths, and more particularly suicides, during international travel receive a disproportionately low level of attention in the travel medicine literature. We describe the demographic profile of international travellers whose death occurred at the Cliffs of Moher along the Atlantic seaboard in Ireland.

    Methods: Coroners' files for the 25 years between 1993 and 2017 were interrogated. All cases of death on or at the cliffs were examined, and demographic data were extracted, including date of death, gender, age, nationality, whether the victims were alone at the cliffs prior to their death, whether the fall was witnessed, prevailing weather conditions, post-mortem examinations, toxicology reports and inquest verdicts.

    Results: Overall, 66 deaths occurred on or at the base of the Cliffs of Moher during the period 1993 through August 2017. In total, 18 (27.3%) of the victims were international visitors to Ireland, including 11 males (61.1%). The mean age of travellers (n = 17) was 34.2 years. Victims were nationals of 12 different countries, with 13 being European nationals. Most deaths occurred in summer (n = 7) or spring (n = 6), with eight deaths (44%) reported at weekends. In total, 15 victims (83.3%) had walked along the cliff path alone. A jump or fall from the cliffs was witnessed in only two cases (11.1%). Post-mortem examinations revealed multiple traumatic injuries consistent with a fall from a height. Four cases had evidence of alcohol intoxication. Suicide or open verdicts were returned in 50% (n = 9) of the cases.

    Conclusions: Travelling alone to the site, purchasing one-way tickets, or depositing belongings on the clifftop support the possibility of suicidal intent, while being intoxicated could be a co-factor in suicidal jumps or support the possibility of an accidental fall. This knowledge could help to identify travellers at the greatest risk of death at cliffs.

  5. Flaherty G, Udoeyop I, Whooley P, Jones M
    J Travel Med, 2017 05 01;24(3).
    PMID: 28355618 DOI: 10.1093/jtm/taw100
  6. Flaherty GT, Lim Yap K
    J Travel Med, 2017 Sep 01;24(5).
    PMID: 28498914 DOI: 10.1093/jtm/tax024
    Evidence-based travel medicine requires that research priorities reflect the wide knowledge base of this discipline. Bibliometric analysis of articles published in Journal of Travel Medicine yielded the following results: epidemiology (6%, n = 105); immunology/vaccinology (8.5%, n = 148); pre-travel assessment/consultation (30.5%, n = 533); diseases contracted during travel (48.3%, n = 843); other clinical conditions associated with travel (6.8%, n = 119); post-travel assessment (5.2%, n = 91) and administrative and general travel medicine issues (6%, n = 105).
  7. Lim PL, Oh HM, Ooi EE
    J Travel Med, 2009 Jul-Aug;16(4):289-91.
    PMID: 19674272 DOI: 10.1111/j.1708-8305.2009.00313.x
    Chikungunya infections were detected in Singapore among returning travelers who had visited friends and relatives (VFR) in India and Malaysia. These sporadic imported cases occurred over a year before the 2008 chikungunya outbreaks in Singapore, demonstrating the potential for introducing this emerging viral infection into new areas via VFR travel.
  8. Townsend CJ, Loughlin JM
    J Travel Med, 1998 Dec;5(4):226-7.
    PMID: 9876202
    Missionaries are well known to suffer the effects of stress. Patricia Miersma relates missionary stress to combat related stress. 1 Development workers too are known to be at increased risk of death whilst overseas-mostly due to traumatic incidents. Relief workers voluntarily enter high stress situations. These overseas workers are at real risk of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). The issue of Critical Incident Stress Debriefing (CISD, or Psychological Debriefing) has been critically examined in an editorial in the British Medical Journal.3 The first randomized, controlled study of CISD that we are aware of (for motor vehicle accident survivors) was published in 1996.4 With 54 intervention subjects, it did not demonstrate effectiveness.
  9. Lippmann JM, Fenner PJ, Winkel K, Gershwin LA
    J Travel Med, 2011 Jul-Aug;18(4):275-81.
    PMID: 21722240 DOI: 10.1111/j.1708-8305.2011.00531.x
    Jellyfish are a common cause of injury throughout the world, with fatalities and severe systemic events not uncommon after tropical stings. The internet is a recent innovation to gain information on real-time health issues of travel destinations, including Southeast Asia.
  10. Kimmitt PT, Kirby A, Perera N, Nicholson KG, Schober PC, Rajakumar K, et al.
    J Travel Med, 2008;15(5):369-71.
    PMID: 19006515 DOI: 10.1111/j.1708-8305.2008.00240.x
    Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are an increasingly common and important cause of a fever in a returning traveler. Systemic complications of STIs, human immunodeficiency virus seroconversion illness, and secondary syphilis are diagnoses that can easily be missed. We present a case of culture-negative disseminated gonococcal infection presenting with fever, malaise, polyarthralgia, arthritis, and a rash that developed following orogenital contact and was diagnosed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. This technology has major potential to improve the speed and sensitivity of diagnosis and consequent management of patients with this syndrome.
    Study site: United Kingdom (patient had recent travel to Thailand and Malaysia)
  11. Flaherty GT, Chen B, Avalos G
    J Travel Med, 2017 Sep 01;24(6).
    PMID: 28922821 DOI: 10.1093/jtm/tax059
    The purpose of this study was to examine the principal travel health priorities of travellers. The most frequently selected travel health concerns were accessing medical care abroad, dying abroad, insect bites, malaria, personal safety and travel security threats. The travel health risks of least concern were culture shock, fear of flying, jet lag and sexually transmitted infections. This study is the first to develop a hierarchy of self-declared travel health risk priorities among travellers.
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