Displaying publications 1 - 20 of 90 in total

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  1. Dougall D, Abraham EP
    Nature, 1955;176:256.
    DOI: 10.1038/176256a0
    WHILE studying the antibacterial products of a species of Streptomyces (N.C.I.B. 8697) sent by Dr. R. Green from Malaya, we have isolated an orange-red coloured basic substance which is very active against a variety of bacteria and is highly toxic to mice. The antibiotic was extracted from the culture fluid into chloroform, at pH 6, and re-extracted into water at pH 2, or extracted into trichloroethylene, at pH 8.5, and re-extracted into water at pH 3.5. It was purified by counter-current distribution in a solvent system consisting of trichloroethylene and 0.1 M sodium citrate buffer, pH. 5.95. In this system its partition coefficient, K (Combining double low line concentration in trichloroethylene/concentration in water), was 0.98. The purified product yielded a crystalline hydrochloride, reineckate and picrate. The behaviour of this antibiotic suggests that it is identical with, or very closely related to, xanthomycin A - a substance which has been isolated from species of Streptomyces1, and stated to have quinonoid properties2. We wish to record, however, that it is a stronger base than xanthomycin A has been reported to be and that it yields two simple bases on hydrolysis which have not been described as degradation products of xanthomycin A. © 1955 Nature Publishing Group.
  2. Cressey D
    Nature, 2015 May 28;521(7553):401-2.
    PMID: 26017420 DOI: 10.1038/521401a
  3. Rhie A, McCarthy SA, Fedrigo O, Damas J, Formenti G, Koren S, et al.
    Nature, 2021 04;592(7856):737-746.
    PMID: 33911273 DOI: 10.1038/s41586-021-03451-0
    High-quality and complete reference genome assemblies are fundamental for the application of genomics to biology, disease, and biodiversity conservation. However, such assemblies are available for only a few non-microbial species1-4. To address this issue, the international Genome 10K (G10K) consortium5,6 has worked over a five-year period to evaluate and develop cost-effective methods for assembling highly accurate and nearly complete reference genomes. Here we present lessons learned from generating assemblies for 16 species that represent six major vertebrate lineages. We confirm that long-read sequencing technologies are essential for maximizing genome quality, and that unresolved complex repeats and haplotype heterozygosity are major sources of assembly error when not handled correctly. Our assemblies correct substantial errors, add missing sequence in some of the best historical reference genomes, and reveal biological discoveries. These include the identification of many false gene duplications, increases in gene sizes, chromosome rearrangements that are specific to lineages, a repeated independent chromosome breakpoint in bat genomes, and a canonical GC-rich pattern in protein-coding genes and their regulatory regions. Adopting these lessons, we have embarked on the Vertebrate Genomes Project (VGP), an international effort to generate high-quality, complete reference genomes for all of the roughly 70,000 extant vertebrate species and to help to enable a new era of discovery across the life sciences.
  4. Walton HJ
    Nature, 1922;109:334-335.
    DR. WATSON'S book shows clearly the wide range of scientific knowledge which is required by those who work in the tropics either as physicians or as sanitarians. It is unnecessary nowadays to insist upon the importance of the control of malaria in the development of those vast areas from which is derived so much of the food supplies and raw materials of manufacture of all civilised countries, but only those who have had practical experience of the methods used to deal with the disease can appreciate how many and how varied these must be.
  5. Singh R, Low ET, Ooi LC, Ong-Abdullah M, Ting NC, Nagappan J, et al.
    Nature, 2013 Aug 15;500(7462):340-4.
    PMID: 23883930 DOI: 10.1038/nature12356
    A key event in the domestication and breeding of the oil palm Elaeis guineensis was loss of the thick coconut-like shell surrounding the kernel. Modern E. guineensis has three fruit forms, dura (thick-shelled), pisifera (shell-less) and tenera (thin-shelled), a hybrid between dura and pisifera. The pisifera palm is usually female-sterile. The tenera palm yields far more oil than dura, and is the basis for commercial palm oil production in all of southeast Asia. Here we describe the mapping and identification of the SHELL gene responsible for the different fruit forms. Using homozygosity mapping by sequencing, we found two independent mutations in the DNA-binding domain of a homologue of the MADS-box gene SEEDSTICK (STK, also known as AGAMOUS-LIKE 11), which controls ovule identity and seed development in Arabidopsis. The SHELL gene is responsible for the tenera phenotype in both cultivated and wild palms from sub-Saharan Africa, and our findings provide a genetic explanation for the single gene hybrid vigour (or heterosis) attributed to SHELL, via heterodimerization. This gene mutation explains the single most important economic trait in oil palm, and has implications for the competing interests of global edible oil production, biofuels and rainforest conservation.
  6. Haddon AC
    Nature, 1896;55:128-130.
    DOI: 10.1038/055128a0
    ANTHROPOLOGISTS are again indebted to Mr. Ling Roth for presenting to them, in a convenient form, the results of wide reading and diligent compilation. It is by such well-directed enthusiasm that the labours of the student are materially lightened; for not only has the author, in this instance, marshalled a portentous array of accurately acknowledged quotations, but he has sedulously collected illustrations of objects preserved m numerous museums and private collections, in order to fully illustrate the descriptions that he quotes.
  7. Costello C, Cao L, Gelcich S, Cisneros-Mata MÁ, Free CM, Froehlich HE, et al.
    Nature, 2020 12;588(7836):95-100.
    PMID: 32814903 DOI: 10.1038/s41586-020-2616-y
    Global food demand is rising, and serious questions remain about whether supply can increase sustainably1. Land-based expansion is possible but may exacerbate climate change and biodiversity loss, and compromise the delivery of other ecosystem services2-6. As food from the sea represents only 17% of the current production of edible meat, we ask how much food we can expect the ocean to sustainably produce by 2050. Here we examine the main food-producing sectors in the ocean-wild fisheries, finfish mariculture and bivalve mariculture-to estimate 'sustainable supply curves' that account for ecological, economic, regulatory and technological constraints. We overlay these supply curves with demand scenarios to estimate future seafood production. We find that under our estimated demand shifts and supply scenarios (which account for policy reform and technology improvements), edible food from the sea could increase by 21-44 million tonnes by 2050, a 36-74% increase compared to current yields. This represents 12-25% of the estimated increase in all meat needed to feed 9.8 billion people by 2050. Increases in all three sectors are likely, but are most pronounced for mariculture. Whether these production potentials are realized sustainably will depend on factors such as policy reforms, technological innovation and the extent of future shifts in demand.
  8. Watson M
    Nature, 1923;112:470-471.
    BEFORE Sir Ronald Ross's epoch-making discovery, there was no more puzzling problem in medicine than the cause of malaria; no secret in Nature more cunningly hid than the malaria secret. Malaria was known to be connected with swamps, and to be reduced by drainage and cultivation. Yet, as if merely to confuse, men found that to flood some swamps actually improved health; and elsewhere that drainage and the cultivation of the soil produced the most serious and devastating outbursts of the disease. Yet again, malaria was found not only in swamps, but also often on hills and dry sandy deserts. Some jungle-covered land was singularly free from malaria: other jungle land was intensely malarial. In fact, malaria existed on soils of every conceivable variety, of every age in geological time. It was-impossible to point to any mineral, chemical, or vegetable condition essential to its presence. It was, and had been for hundreds of years, a dark, inscrutable mystery.
  9. Seibold S, Rammer W, Hothorn T, Seidl R, Ulyshen MD, Lorz J, et al.
    Nature, 2021 09;597(7874):77-81.
    PMID: 34471275 DOI: 10.1038/s41586-021-03740-8
    The amount of carbon stored in deadwood is equivalent to about 8 per cent of the global forest carbon stocks1. The decomposition of deadwood is largely governed by climate2-5 with decomposer groups-such as microorganisms and insects-contributing to variations in the decomposition rates2,6,7. At the global scale, the contribution of insects to the decomposition of deadwood and carbon release remains poorly understood7. Here we present a field experiment of wood decomposition across 55 forest sites and 6 continents. We find that the deadwood decomposition rates increase with temperature, and the strongest temperature effect is found at high precipitation levels. Precipitation affects the decomposition rates negatively at low temperatures and positively at high temperatures. As a net effect-including the direct consumption by insects and indirect effects through interactions with microorganisms-insects accelerate the decomposition in tropical forests (3.9% median mass loss per year). In temperate and boreal forests, we find weak positive and negative effects with a median mass loss of 0.9 per cent and -0.1 per cent per year, respectively. Furthermore, we apply the experimentally derived decomposition function to a global map of deadwood carbon synthesized from empirical and remote-sensing data, obtaining an estimate of 10.9 ± 3.2 petagram of carbon per year released from deadwood globally, with 93 per cent originating from tropical forests. Globally, the net effect of insects may account for 29 per cent of the carbon flux from deadwood, which suggests a functional importance of insects in the decomposition of deadwood and the carbon cycle.
  10. Nature, 1997 Sep 25;389(6649):315.
    PMID: 9311758
  11. Usinowicz J, Chang-Yang CH, Chen YY, Clark JS, Fletcher C, Garwood NC, et al.
    Nature, 2017 10 05;550(7674):105-108.
    PMID: 28953870 DOI: 10.1038/nature24038
    The tropical forests of Borneo and Amazonia may each contain more tree species diversity in half a square kilometre than do all the temperate forests of Europe, North America, and Asia combined. Biologists have long been fascinated by this disparity, using it to investigate potential drivers of biodiversity. Latitudinal variation in many of these drivers is expected to create geographic differences in ecological and evolutionary processes, and evidence increasingly shows that tropical ecosystems have higher rates of diversification, clade origination, and clade dispersal. However, there is currently no evidence to link gradients in ecological processes within communities at a local scale directly to the geographic gradient in biodiversity. Here, we show geographic variation in the storage effect, an ecological mechanism that reduces the potential for competitive exclusion more strongly in the tropics than it does in temperate and boreal zones, decreasing the ratio of interspecific-to-intraspecific competition by 0.25% for each degree of latitude that an ecosystem is located closer to the Equator. Additionally, we find evidence that latitudinal variation in climate underpins these differences; longer growing seasons in the tropics reduce constraints on the seasonal timing of reproduction, permitting lower recruitment synchrony between species and thereby enhancing niche partitioning through the storage effect. Our results demonstrate that the strength of the storage effect, and therefore its impact on diversity within communities, varies latitudinally in association with climate. This finding highlights the importance of biotic interactions in shaping geographic diversity patterns, and emphasizes the need to understand the mechanisms underpinning ecological processes in greater detail than has previously been appreciated.
  12. Nature, 2005 Aug 11;436(7052):754.
    PMID: 16094324
  13. Cyranoski D
    Nature, 2008 May 22;453(7194):435.
    PMID: 18497781 DOI: 10.1038/453435a
  14. Cyranoski D, Law YH, Ong S, Phillips N, Zastrow M
    Nature, 2018 06;558(7711):502-510.
    PMID: 29950631 DOI: 10.1038/d41586-018-05506-1
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