Displaying publications 1 - 20 of 254 in total

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  1. Gény C, Abou Samra A, Retailleau P, Iorga BI, Nedev H, Awang K, et al.
    J Nat Prod, 2017 12 22;80(12):3179-3185.
    PMID: 29160716 DOI: 10.1021/acs.jnatprod.7b00494
    Four new compounds, (+)- and (-)-ecarlottone (1), (±)-fislatifolione (5), (±)-isofislatifolione (6), and (±)-fislatifolic acid (7), and the known desmethoxyyangonin (2), didymocarpin-A (3), and dehydrodidymocarpin-A (4) were isolated from the stem bark of Fissistigma latifolium, by means of bioassay-guided purification using an in vitro affinity displacement assay based on the modulation of Bcl-xL/Bak and Mcl-1/Bid interactions. The structures of the new compounds were elucidated by NMR spectroscopic data analysis, and the absolute configurations of compounds (+)-1 and (-)-1 were assigned by comparison of experimental and computed ECD spectra. (-)-Ecarlottone 1 exhibited a potent antagonistic activity on both protein-protein associations with Ki values of 4.8 μM for Bcl-xL/Bak and 2.4 μM for Mcl-1/Bid.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology
  2. Taha H, Looi CY, Arya A, Wong WF, Yap LF, Hasanpourghadi M, et al.
    PLoS One, 2015;10(5):e0126126.
    PMID: 25946039 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0126126
    Phytochemicals from Pseuduvaria species have been reported to display a wide range of biological activities. In the present study, a known benzopyran derivative, (6E,10E) isopolycerasoidol (1), and a new benzopyran derivative, (6E,10E) isopolycerasoidol methyl ester (2), were isolated from a methanol extract of Pseuduvaria monticola leaves. The structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic methods including 1D and 2D NMR, IR, UV, and LCMS-QTOF, and by comparison with previously published data. The anti-proliferative and cytotoxic effects of these compounds on human breast cancer cell-lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) and a human normal breast epithelial cell line (MCF-10A) were investigated. MTT results revealed both (1) and (2) were efficient in reducing cell viability of breast cancer cells. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that (1) and (2) induced cell death via apoptosis, as demonstrated by an increase in phosphotidylserine exposure. Both compounds elevated ROS production, leading to reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and increased plasma membrane permeability in breast cancer cells. These effects occurred concomitantly with a dose-dependent activation of caspase 3/7 and 9, a down-regulation of the anti-apoptotic gene BCL2 and the accumulation of p38 MAPK in the nucleus. Taken together, our data demonstrate that (1) and (2) induce intrinsic mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in human breast cancer cells, which provides the first pharmacological evidence for their future development as anticancer agents.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology*
  3. In LL, Arshad NM, Ibrahim H, Azmi MN, Awang K, Nagoor NH
    PMID: 23043547 DOI: 10.1186/1472-6882-12-179
    Oral cancers although preventable, possess a low five-year survival rate which has remained unchanged over the past three decades. In an attempt to find a more safe, affordable and effective treatment option, we describe here the use of 1'S-1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA), a component of Malaysian ginger traditionally used for various medicinal purposes.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology
  4. Hasima N, Aun LI, Azmi MN, Aziz AN, Thirthagiri E, Ibrahim H, et al.
    Phytomedicine, 2010 Oct;17(12):935-9.
    PMID: 20729047 DOI: 10.1016/j.phymed.2010.03.011
    Medicinal plants containing active natural compounds have been used as an alternative treatment for cancer patients in many parts of the world especially in Asia (Itharat et al. 2004). In this report, we describe the cytotoxic and apoptotic properties of 1'S-1'-acetoxyeugenol acetate (AEA), an analogue of 1'S-1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA), isolated from the Malaysian ethno-medicinal plant Alpinia conchigera Griff (Zingiberaceae) on human breast cancer cells. Data from MTT cell viability assays indicated that AEA induced both time- and dose-dependent cytotoxicity with an IC(50) value of 14.0 μM within 36 h of treatment on MCF-7 cells, but not in HMEC normal control cells. Both annexin V-FITC/PI flow cytometric analysis and DNA fragmentation assays confirmed that AEA induced cell death via apoptosis. AEA was also found to induce cell cycle arrest in MCF-7 cells at the G(0)/G(1) phase with no adverse cell cycle arrest effects on HMEC normal control cells. It was concluded that AEA isolated from the Malaysian tropical ginger represents a potential chemotherapeutic agent against human breast cancer cells with higher cytotoxicity potency than its analogue, ACA.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology
  5. Lay MM, Karsani SA, Malek SN
    Int J Mol Sci, 2014;15(1):468-83.
    PMID: 24451128 DOI: 10.3390/ijms15010468
    1-(2,6-Dihydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl) ethanone (DMHE) was isolated from the ethyl acetate fraction of Phaleria macrocarpa (Scheff.) Boerl fruits and the structure confirmed by GC-MS (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry) and NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) analysis. This compound was tested on the HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma cell line using MTT (method of transcriptional and translational) cell proliferation assay. The results of MTT assay showed that DMHE exhibited good cytotoxic effect on HT-29 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner but no cytotoxic effect on the MRC-5 cell line after 72 h incubation. Morphological features of apoptotic cells upon treatment by DMHE, e.g., cell shrinkage and membrane blebbing, were examined by an inverted and phase microscope. Other features, such as chromatin condension and nuclear fragmentation were studied using acridine orange and propidium iodide staining under the fluorescence microscope. Future evidence of apoptosis/necrosis was provided by result fromannexin V-FITC/PI (fluorescein-isothiocyanate/propidium iodide) staining revealed the percentage of early apoptotic, late apoptotic, necrotic and live cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner using flow cytometry. Cell cycle analysis showed G0/G1 arrest in a time-dependent manner. A western blot analysis indicated that cell death might be associated with the up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bax PUMA. However, the anit-apotptic proteins Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and Mcl-1 were also found to increase in a time-dependent manner. The expression of the pro-apoptotic protein Bak was not observed.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology*
  6. Al-Khdhairawi AAQ, Krishnan P, Mai CW, Chung FF, Leong CO, Yong KT, et al.
    J Nat Prod, 2017 10 27;80(10):2734-2740.
    PMID: 28926237 DOI: 10.1021/acs.jnatprod.7b00500
    Tengerensine (1), isolated as a racemate and constituted from a pair of bis-benzopyrroloisoquinoline enantiomers, and tengechlorenine (2), purified as a scalemic mixture and constituted from a pair of chlorinated phenanthroindolizidine enantiomers, were isolated from the leaves of Ficus fistulosa var. tengerensis, along with three other known alkaloids. The structures of 1 and 2 were determined by spectroscopic data interpretation and X-ray diffraction analysis. The enantiomers of 1 were separated by chiral-phase HPLC, and the absolute configurations of (+)-1 and (-)-1 were established via experimental and calculated ECD data. Compound 1 is notable in being a rare unsymmetrical cyclobutane adduct and is the first example of a dimeric benzopyrroloisoquinoline alkaloid, while compound 2 represents the first naturally occurring halogenated phenanthroindolizidine alkaloid. Compound (+)-1 displayed a selective in vitro cytotoxic effect against MDA-MB-468 cells (IC50 7.4 μM), while compound 2 showed pronounced in vitro cytotoxic activity against all three breast cancer cell lines tested (MDA-MB-468, MDA-MB-231, and MCF7; IC50 values of 0.038-0.91 μM).
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology*
  7. Seyed MA, Jantan I, Bukhari SN, Vijayaraghavan K
    J Agric Food Chem, 2016 Feb 3;64(4):725-37.
    PMID: 26758628 DOI: 10.1021/acs.jafc.5b05993
    Cancer is a diverse class of diseases characterized by uncontrolled cell growth that constitutes the greatest cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Despite steady progress, the treatment modalities of cancer are still insufficient. Several new concepts have emerged for therapeutic intervention in malignant diseases with the goal of identifying specific targets and overcoming resistance against current cytotoxic therapies. Many studies have reported the remarkable and significant properties of dietary plant polyphenols such as curcumin, resveratrol, flavopiridol, indirubin, magnolol, piceatannol, parthenolide, epigallocatechin gallate, and cucurbitacin as anticancer agents known for their pleiotropic effects on cancer, immune cells, and inflammation. Piceatannol, an analogue and metabolite of resveratrol, is a natural stilbene commonly found in grape skins and wine. Compared to resveratrol, this molecule exhibits superior bioactivities as an inhibitor of COX-1/2 and the CSN-associated kinase. Piceatannol is thought to be a potent natural compound with many therapeutic effects, such as the prevention of hypercholesterolemia, arrhythmia, atherosclerosis, angiogenesis, and cardiovascular diseases. It also demonstrates vasorelaxation, antioxidant, and anticancer activities. This comprehensive review summarizes the current data regarding the mechanisms of action of piceatannol, its chemopreventive properties, and its possible therapeutic potential against various types of human cancer.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology*
  8. Lim SH, Mahmood K, Komiyama K, Kam TS
    J Nat Prod, 2008 Jun;71(6):1104-6.
    PMID: 18462006 DOI: 10.1021/np800123g
    A new cycloartane, monocarpinine (1), incorporating a fused tetrahydrofuranyl ring, and a cytotoxic tetracyclic lactam, monomarginine (2), were isolated from a stem bark extract of the Malayan species Monocarpia marginalis. The structures of these compounds were determined using NMR and MS analysis. Monomarginine (2) showed appreciable cytotoxicity toward human KB (both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant) and Jurkat cells.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology*
  9. Abas F, Lajis NH, Shaari K, Israf DA, Stanslas J, Yusuf UK, et al.
    J Nat Prod, 2005 Jul;68(7):1090-3.
    PMID: 16038556
    A new labdane diterpene glucoside, curcumanggoside (1), together with nine known compounds, including labda-8(17),12-diene-15,16-dial (2), calcaratarin A (3), zerumin B (4), scopoletin, demethoxycurcumin, bisdemethoxycurcumin, 1,7-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1,4,6-heptatrien-3-one, curcumin, and p-hydroxycinnamic acid, have been isolated from the rhizomes of Curcuma mangga. Their structures were determined using a combination of 1D (1H NMR, 13C NMR, DEPT) and 2D (COSY, HSQC, HMBC) NMR techniques. All diarylheptanoids and scopoletin showed significant antioxidant activity. Zerumin B, demethoxycurcumin, bisdemethoxycurcumin, and curcumin also exhibited cytotoxic activity against a panel of five human tumor cell lines.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology
  10. Zhang M, Yang Q, Zhang X, Wu H
    Nat Prod Res, 2021 Oct;35(20):3426-3431.
    PMID: 31821060 DOI: 10.1080/14786419.2019.1700509
    A new cycloartane triterpene bisdesmoside, soulieoside T (1), and one known compound, oleanolic acid (2), were isolated from the ethanolic extract of the rhizomes of Actaea vaginata. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods and by comparison with data reported in the literature. Compound 1 was evaluated for cytotoxic activities against three human cancer cell lines.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology*
  11. Supriatno, Nurlelasari, Herlina T, Harneti D, Maharani R, Hidayat AT, et al.
    Nat Prod Res, 2018 Nov;32(21):2610-2616.
    PMID: 29368952 DOI: 10.1080/14786419.2018.1428600
    A new limonoid, pentandricine (1), along with three known limonoids, ceramicine B (2), 6-de(acetyloxy)-23-oxochisocheton (3), 6-de(acetyloxy)-23-oxo-7-O-deacetylchisocheton (4), have been isolated from the stembark of Chisocheton pentandrus. The chemical structures of the new compound were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic evidence. All of the compounds were tested for their cytotoxic effects against MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Compounds 1-4 showed weak and no cytotoxicity against MCF-7 breast cancer cells with IC50 values of 369.84, 150.86, 208.93 and 120.09 μM, respectively.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology*
  12. Al Muqarrabun LM, Ahmat N, Aris SR, Shamsulrijal N, Baharum SN, Ahmad R, et al.
    Nat Prod Res, 2014;28(9):597-605.
    PMID: 24568340 DOI: 10.1080/14786419.2014.886211
    A new sesquiterpenoid, malayscaphiol (1), and three known compounds, lupeol (2), lupenone (3) and stigmasterol (4), were isolated from the methanolic extract of the stem bark of Scaphium macropodum. The structures of the isolated compounds were determined using several spectroscopic methods, including UV-vis, FT-IR, 1D and 2D NMR, and mass spectrometer. Major isolated compounds were assayed for cytotoxicity and anti-acetylcholinesterase activities. The chemotaxonomy significance of this plant was also discussed.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology
  13. Ahmat N, Wibowo A, Mohamad SA, Low AL, Sufian AS, Yusof MI, et al.
    J Asian Nat Prod Res, 2014;16(11):1099-107.
    PMID: 25034352 DOI: 10.1080/10286020.2014.938059
    A new tetramer oligostilbenoid possessing tetrahydrofuran ring, malaysianol C (1), was isolated from the acetone extract of the stem bark of Dryobalanops lanceolata, together with four known oligostilbenoids nepalensinol E (2), ϵ-viniferin (3), laevifonol (4), and ampelopsin F (5). The structures of isolated compounds were elucidated on the basis of spectral evidence. The antibacterial activity of the isolated compounds was evaluated using resazurin microtitre-plate assay, whereas the cytotoxic activity was tested using MTT assay. The plausible biogenetic routes of the isolated compounds are also discussed.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology
  14. Al Muqarrabun LM, Ahmat N, Aris SR, Norizan N, Shamsulrijal N, Yusof FZ, et al.
    Nat Prod Res, 2014;28(13):1003-9.
    PMID: 24697194 DOI: 10.1080/14786419.2014.903396
    A new triterpene, malaytaraxerate (1), and four known compounds, taraxerol (2), taraxerone (3), docosyl isoferulate (4) and docosanoic acid 2',3'-dihydroxypropyl ester (5), were isolated from the acetone extract of Sapium baccatum stem bark. The structures of the isolated compounds were determined using several spectroscopic methods, including UV-Vis, FT-IR, 1D and 2D NMR, and mass spectrometry. Major isolated compounds were assayed for cytotoxicity. The chemotaxonomic significance of this plant was also studied.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology
  15. Shu YH, Yuan HH, Xu MT, Hong YT, Gao CC, Wu ZP, et al.
    Acta Pharmacol Sin, 2021 May;42(5):780-790.
    PMID: 32814819 DOI: 10.1038/s41401-020-0492-5
    Guangsangon E (GSE) is a novel Diels-Alder adduct isolated from leaves of Morus alba L, a traditional Chinese medicine widely applied in respiratory diseases. It is reported that GSE has cytotoxic effect on cancer cells. In our research, we investigated its anticancer effect on respiratory cancer and revealed that GSE induces autophagy and apoptosis in lung and nasopharyngeal cancer cells. We first observed that GSE inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in A549 and CNE1 cells. Meanwhile, the upregulation of autophagosome marker LC3 and increased formation of GFP-LC3 puncta demonstrates the induction of autophagy in GSE-treated cells. Moreover, GSE increases the autophagy flux by enhancing lysosomal activity and the fusion of autophagosomes and lysosomes. Next, we investigated that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in autophagy induction by GSE. GSE activates the ER stress through reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, which can be blocked by ROS scavenger NAC. Finally, inhibition of autophagy attenuates GSE-caused cell death, termed as "autophagy-mediated cell death." Taken together, we revealed the molecular mechanism of GSE against respiratory cancer, which demonstrates great potential of GSE in the treatment of representative cancer.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology
  16. Abubakar IB, Loh HS
    J Pharm Pharmacol, 2016 Apr;68(4):423-32.
    PMID: 26887962 DOI: 10.1111/jphp.12523
    OBJECTIVES: Tabernaemontana is a genus from the plant family, Apocynaceae with vast medicinal application and widespread distribution in the tropics and subtropics of Africa, Americas and Asia. The objective of this study is to critically evaluate the ethnobotany, medicinal uses, pharmacology and phytochemistry of the species, Tabernaemontana corymbosa (Roxb. ex Wall.) and provide information on the potential future application of alkaloids isolated from different parts of the plant.

    KEY FINDINGS: T. corymbosa (Roxb. ex Wall.) parts are used as poultice, boiled juice, decoctions and infusions for treatment against ulceration, fracture, post-natal recovery, syphilis, fever, tumours and orchitis in Malaysia, China, Thailand and Bangladesh. Studies recorded alkaloids as the predominant phytochemicals in addition to phenols, saponins and sterols with vast bioactivities such as antimicrobial, analgesic, anthelmintic, vasorelaxation, antiviral and cytotoxicity.

    SUMMARY: An evaluation of scientific data and traditional medicine revealed the medicinal uses of different parts of T. corymbosa (Roxb. ex Wall.) across Asia. Future studies exploring the structure-bioactivity relationship of alkaloids such as jerantinine and vincamajicine among others could potentially improve the future application towards reversing anticancer drug resistance.

    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology*
  17. Shipton FN, Khoo TJ, Hossan MS, Wiart C
    J Ethnopharmacol, 2017 Feb 23;198:91-97.
    PMID: 28049063 DOI: 10.1016/j.jep.2016.12.045
    ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Pericampylus glaucus is a climbing plant found across Asia and used in traditional medicine to treat a number of conditions including splenomegaly, fever, cough, laryngitis, pulmonary disease, asthma, headache, hair loss, snake bite, boar bite, factures, boils, tumours, tetanus, rheumatic pain, itches and eclampsia.

    AIM OF THE STUDY: To test extracts of P. glaucus in a number of bioassays and determine the legitimacy of its traditional use.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: The stems, leaves, roots and fruits of P. glaucus were collected and extracted sequentially with hexane, chloroform and ethanol, respectively. The anti-inflammatory activity was assessed by testing the ability of the extracts to inhibit heat induced protein denaturation, stabilise human red blood cells under hypotonic stress and by testing the inhibitory activity of the extracts against cyclooxygenases 1 and 2. Cytotoxicity was tested using the human lung epithelial cell line MRC-5 and nasopharangeal carcinoma cell line HK1 in the MTT assay.

    RESULTS: Many of the samples showed an ability to prevent heat induced protein denaturation, as well as prevent lysis of red blood cells. Most of the extracts demonstrated inhibitory activity towards both of the COX enzymes. The ethanol extracts tended to demonstrate greater toxicity than other extracts, with some of the other extracts significantly enhancing growth and metabolism of the cells.

    CONCLUSION: The benefit of P. glaucus for the treatment of diseases related to inflammation and cancer was supported by the in vitro assays adopted in this study.

    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology*
  18. Abubakar IB, Lim KH, Loh HS
    Nat Prod Res, 2015;29(22):2137-40.
    PMID: 25515603 DOI: 10.1080/14786419.2014.991927
    Tocotrienols have been reported to possess anticancer effects other than anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. This study explored the potential synergism of antiproliferative effects induced by individual alkaloid extracts of Ficus fistulosa, Ficus hispida and Ficus schwarzii combined with δ- and γ-tocotrienols against human brain glioblastoma (U87MG), lung adenocarcinoma (A549) and colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT-29) cells. Cell viability and morphological results demonstrated that extracts containing a mixture of alkaloids from the leaves and bark of F. schwarzii inhibited the proliferation of HT-29 cells, whereas the alkaloid extracts of F. fistulosa inhibited the proliferation of both U87MG and HT-29 cells and showed synergism in combined treatments with either δ- or γ-tocotrienol resulting in 2.2-34.7 fold of reduction in IC50 values of tocotrienols. The observed apoptotic cell characteristics in conjunction with the synergistic antiproliferative effects of Ficus species-derived alkaloids and tocotrienols assuredly warrant future investigations towards the development of a value-added chemotherapeutic regimen against cancers.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology
  19. Lee ST, Wong PF, He H, Hooper JD, Mustafa MR
    PLoS One, 2013;8(2):e57708.
    PMID: 23437404 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0057708
    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) plays a role in prostate cancer and agents that suppress its activation may inhibit development or progression of this malignancy. Alpha (α)-tomatine is the major saponin present in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) and we have previously reported that it suppresses tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)-induced nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in androgen-independent prostate cancer PC-3 cells and also potently induces apoptosis of these cells. However, the precise mechanism by which α-tomatine suppresses NF-κB nuclear translocation is yet to be elucidated and the anti-tumor activity of this agent in vivo has not been examined.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology*
  20. Lee ST, Wong PF, Hooper JD, Mustafa MR
    Phytomedicine, 2013 Nov 15;20(14):1297-305.
    PMID: 23920276 DOI: 10.1016/j.phymed.2013.07.002
    Alpha (α)-tomatine, a major saponin found in tomato has been shown to inhibit the growth of androgen-independent prostate cancer PC-3 cells. The effects of α-tomatine in combination with the chemotherapeutic agent paclitaxel against PC-3 cells were investigated in the present study. Combined treatment with a sub-toxic dose of α-tomatine and paclitaxel significantly decreased cell viability with concomitant increase in the percentage of apoptotic PC-3 cells. The combined treatment, however, had no cytotoxic effect on the non-neoplastic prostate RWPE-1 cells. Apoptosis of PC-3 cells was accompanied by the inhibition of PI3K/Akt pro-survival signaling, an increase in the expression of the pro-apoptotic protein BAD but a decrease in the expressions of anti-apoptotic proteins, Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. Results from a mouse xenograft model showed the combined treatment completely suppressed subcutaneous tumor growth without significant side effects. Consistent with its in vitro anti-cancer effects, tumor materials from mice showed increased apoptosis of tumor cells with reduced protein expression of activated PI3K/Akt. These results suggest that the synergistic anti-cancer effects of paclitaxel and α-tomatine may be beneficial for refractory prostate cancer treatment.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology
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