Displaying publications 1 - 20 of 73 in total

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  1. Inn FX, Ahmed N, Hing EY, Jasman MH
    Urol Ann, 2017 5 10;9(2):194-196.
    PMID: 28479777 DOI: 10.4103/0974-7796.204178
    Tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) and its side effects are well known. However, these are mainly descriptive, with pictorial data lacking. Here, in we report a case of metastatic renal cell carcinoma, treated with TKI, with classic side effects; supplemented with images that demonstrate the adverse effects of the drug. In addition, we discuss and demonstrate the computed tomography changes.
    Matched MeSH terms: Kidney Neoplasms
  2. Teh GC
    Urol. Oncol., 2010 Nov-Dec;28(6):682-5.
    PMID: 21062652 DOI: 10.1016/j.urolonc.2010.03.017
    With maturing functional and oncologic outcomes data, open partial nephrectomy (OPN) has become the standard of care for T1a renal tumor. Laparoscopic approach can provide a speedier recovery with less blood loss and postoperative pain. Presuming adequate laparoscopic expertise, laparoscopic partial nephrectomy can provide equivalent oncologic outcome as for OPN albeit with higher urologic complications rate and longer warm ischemia time. With refinement of technique and use of robotic assistant, the shortcomings of laparoscopic approach can be further reduced. This article is a mini-review on the current status of laparoscopic approach to partial nephrectomy in the management of small renal mass.
    Matched MeSH terms: Kidney Neoplasms/surgery*
  3. Rajandram R, Perumal K, Yap NY
    Transl Androl Urol, 2019 May;8(Suppl 2):S138-S146.
    PMID: 31236331 DOI: 10.21037/tau.2018.11.10
    Obesity is a recognized risk factor for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) the commonest form of kidney cancer. Both obesity and RCC are serious diseases with increasing incidence yearly. This review examined certain obesity associated measurements and adipokines as detection/prognostic indicators for RCC. The obesity related measurements such as body mass index (BMI), waist circumstance (WC), waist-hip ratio (WHR) in predicting RCC are valid when used in conjunction with other risk factors such as age and sex or with histological findings. The adipokine adiponectin holds promising outcomes as a predictive marker in assessing the risk of developing RCC. In addition, tissue leptin/leptin receptor may be a distinguishing marker for RCC subtypes. However, circulating leptin may not be a suitable detection or prognostic biomarker for RCC. The other less investigated adipokines; omentin, visfatin, apelin and resistin are also expressed in RCC but their prognostic capabilities are still inconclusive. BMI, WC and adipokines may be useful additions in a nomogram which includes TNM staging and pathological grading system to detect, confirm and follow-up RCC cases.
    Matched MeSH terms: Kidney Neoplasms
  4. Haritharan T, Sritharan S, Bhimji S
    Med. J. Malaysia, 2006 Oct;61(4):493-5.
    PMID: 17243531 MyJurnal
    Renal angiomyolipomas are innocuous benign tumours which rarely behave aggressively. This is a case of a 48 year old Malay lady presenting with right sided abdominal pain associated with a large right sided abdominal mass. She was diagnosed with renal angiomyolipoma of the right kidney complicated by inferior vena caval tumour thrombosis. She successfully underwent a radical nephrectomy and inferior vena caval thrombectomy using cardiopulmonary bypass and deep hypothermic circulatory arrest.
    Matched MeSH terms: Kidney Neoplasms/pathology*; Kidney Neoplasms/surgery
  5. Rohana J, Boo NY, Hayati AR, Baizura J
    Med. J. Malaysia, 2002 Sep;57(3):364-7.
    PMID: 12440278
    A term newborn infant developed hypovolaemic shock shortly after birth. She was pale with gross hepatomegaly. She required multiple boluses of intravenous fluids, blood products as well as inotropic support. Blood investigations showed persistent thrombocytopenia, anaemia and disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC). She also developed heart failure. She finally succumbed on the eleventh day of life. Autopsy revealed haemangiomatosis involving the liver, lungs, gastrointestinal tract, kidneys and adrenals.
    Matched MeSH terms: Kidney Neoplasms/complications*; Kidney Neoplasms/congenital*
  6. Ho CC, Krishna KK, Praveen S, Goh EH, Lee BC, Zulkifli MZ
    Med. J. Malaysia, 2010 Sep;65(3):229-30.
    PMID: 21939176
    We present a case of a middle-aged man who was incidentally found to have right renal solid mass while investigating for his left eye proptosis. Computerised tomography (CT) scan confirmed the diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma and the tumour was successfully excised via open surgery. The histopathology examination revealed the 10x7x8 cm mass to be a clear cell type renal cell carcinoma. The rare presentation of this metastatic renal cell carcinoma, its diagnosis and management will be discussed.
    Matched MeSH terms: Kidney Neoplasms/diagnosis*; Kidney Neoplasms/surgery
  7. Koh KB, Wightman JA, George J
    Med. J. Malaysia, 1996 Mar;51(1):148-50.
    PMID: 10967998
    Five cases of renal angiomyolipoma which underwent spontaneous rupture are described. These patients presented as an "acute abdomen" for which the diagnosis was not initially apparent. A high index of suspicion is required to make the diagnosis even with modern imaging techniques. The treatment of these tumours is discussed.
    Matched MeSH terms: Kidney Neoplasms/diagnosis*
  8. Thanikasalam K
    Med. J. Malaysia, 1991 Jun;46(2):187-91.
    PMID: 1839425
    The propensity of choriocarcinoma to metastasize to lungs, liver and brain is well known. Though theoretically metastases are possible to anywhere in the body, renal metastases are rare. A 56 year old Malay woman who had total abdominal hysterectomy in 1985 for molar pregnancy presented with haemoptysis and dyspnea in 1990. Examination showed she had choriocarcinoma with pulmonary and renal metastases.
    Matched MeSH terms: Kidney Neoplasms/secondary
  9. Priyanka G, Poh EY, Yeong SS
    Med. J. Malaysia, 2013 Dec;68(6):473-4.
    PMID: 24632917
    Angiomyolipomas (AML) are the most common mesenchymal renal neoplasms arising in the cortex or medulla. Intra-renal and retroperitoneal hemorrhages have been frequently reported. AML can exceptionally involve the renal vein and inferior vena cava. We report a case with extension into the inferior vena cava.
    Matched MeSH terms: Kidney Neoplasms
  10. Segasothy M, Yi AA, Mohamed S
    Med. J. Malaysia, 1983 Jun;38(2):94-7.
    PMID: 6621453
    Tuberous sclerosis is a disease with a well known association with renal masses, both cysts and angiomyolipomas. Reported here is a case of a 26 year old woman who had, in addition to angiomyolipomas of the kidneys, adenoma sebaceum, paraungual fibromas, shagreen patches and cerebral tubers.
    Matched MeSH terms: Kidney Neoplasms/complications*; Kidney Neoplasms/radiography
  11. YEOH GS
    Med J Malaya, 1954 Jun;8(4):351-7.
    PMID: 13193273
    Matched MeSH terms: Kidney Neoplasms*
  12. Ang AH, Lambeth JT, Soo YS, Ong SC
    Med J Malaya, 1970 Sep;25(1):8-16.
    PMID: 4249503
    Matched MeSH terms: Kidney Neoplasms/radiography
  13. Dutt AK
    Med J Malaya, 1969 Dec;24(2):161-3.
    PMID: 4244145
    Matched MeSH terms: Kidney Neoplasms*
  14. Jayaram G, Looi LM
    Malays J Pathol, 1994 Jun;16(1):83-7.
    PMID: 16329582
    A five-month-old male baby presented with an abdominal mass which was found on computerised tomography (CT) to be involving the left kidney. Nephrectomy and histopathological study showed morphological featues of a malignant rhabdoid tumour. The tumour cells stained strongly for cytokeratin and epithelial membrane antigen and less intensely for vimentin. Electron microscopy revealed concentric whorled arrays of intermediate filaments within the tumour cell cytoplasm. The child was put on post-operative chemotherapy and radiotherapy but developed bilateral lung metastases and died three months after surgery.
    Matched MeSH terms: Kidney Neoplasms/pathology*; Kidney Neoplasms/surgery; Kidney Neoplasms/chemistry
  15. Cheah PL, Looi LM, Lin HP
    Malays J Pathol, 1992 Dec;14(2):111-5.
    PMID: 1338998
    Formerly thought to have a constant incidence rate throughout the world, Wilms' tumour (nephroblastoma) has been shown to be less common among Asian children. A retrospective demographic and morphological study of Wilms' tumour histologically diagnosed over a 22-year period at the Department of Pathology, University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur was conducted to assess for inherent demographic and morphological differences between tumours in Malaysian children and those of Western populations. Thirty-seven cases of histologically proven Wilms' tumour qualified for inclusion in this study. 19 patients were Chinese, 13 Malay, 4 Indian and 1 Anglo-asian. 21 were male and 16 were female (M:F ratio = 1.3:1). Their ages ranged from 1 month to 4 years. 70.3% of the patients were below 2 years of age. 36 cases had unilateral and 1 bilateral tumours. Of unilateral tumours, 19 involved the left kidney and 17 the right. Histological assessment, based on criteria of the National Wilms' Tumor Study Group, revealed 20 (52.6%) tumours with a mixed pattern while 8 (21.1%) showed epithelial, 7 (18.4%) blastemal and 3 (7.8%) stromal-predominant patterns. Anaplasia was observed in only 2 tumours (5.3%). There was no obvious difference in age range and sex distribution, laterality of tumours and incidence of anaplasia between this and Western studies. No ethnic predilection was observed. A notably larger percentage of cases were below 2 years of age. Also, a larger proportion of epithelial-predominant and a lower proportion of blastemal-predominant tumours was observed compared with patterns reported from Western populations.
    Matched MeSH terms: Kidney Neoplasms/epidemiology; Kidney Neoplasms/pathology*
  16. Son HJ, Lee H, Kim JH, Yu IK, Han HY
    Malays J Pathol, 2018 Apr;40(1):73-78.
    PMID: 29704388
    Progressively transformed germinal centers (PTGC) is a benign process characterised by a morphological variant of reactive follicular hyperplasia in lymph nodes. It was recently shown that some cases of PTGC are associated with IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) or increased IgG4 plasma cells. Five years ago, a 57-year-old woman presented with enlargement of multiple lymph nodes in the left parotid, submandibular, and neck areas, pathologically diagnosed as PTGC after excisional biopsy. Since then, she has experienced numbness in her extremities, especially the left shoulder and arm, pruritus on the left side of the face and intermittent facial palsy, for which she has been receiving regular symptomatic treatment. Recently the patient developed diabetes mellitus (approximately seven months ago). In routine follow-up scans, a mass was detected in left kidney and magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen prior to surgery revealed a slightly enhanced bulky mass replacing the pancreatic tail and uncinate process. The mass in left kidney was diagnosed as clear cell renal cell carcinoma, and the pathological features of the pancreatic lesion were those of IgG4-related chronic fibrosing pancreatitis. Retrograde examination of the neck lymph node diagnosed as PTGC showed increased deposition of IgG4-positive plasma cells.
    Matched MeSH terms: Kidney Neoplasms/complications; Kidney Neoplasms/pathology
  17. Mohtarrudin N, Ghazali R, Md Roduan MR
    Malays J Pathol, 2018 Dec;40(3):313-318.
    PMID: 30580362
    INTRODUCTION: Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) promotes carcinogenesis by inducing proliferation and angiogenesis while decreasing apoptosis and immunosuppressive activity. It is overexpressed in many malignancies including renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The aim of this study was to investigate COX-2 expression in clear cell RCC and its association with tumour grades and demographic parameters.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-six clear cell RCC cases were selected. There were 21 (58.3%) men and 15 (41.7%) women with median age of 56.6 years (range: 16-74 years). Chinese constituted 16 (44.4%) of the cases; Malays 14 (38.9%) cases and Indian 6 (16.7%) cases. There were 6 (16.7%) grade 1, 20 (55.6%) grade 2, 10 (27.8%) grade 3 and none was grade 4. The paraffin embedded tissues were cut at 4 μm thick and stained with COX-2 monoclonal antibody.

    RESULTS: Eighteen (50%) of the RCC cases were immunopositive, of which all showed strong positivity. The immunopositive cases showed cytoplasmic membrane positivity.

    CONCLUSION: There was no significant association between COX-2 expression with grade, age, sex and ethnicity (p=0.457, p=0.054, p=0.389 and p=0.568 respectively). Strong positivity of COX-2 suggest that COX-2 may play a role in cell proliferation and in carcinogenesis.

    Matched MeSH terms: Kidney Neoplasms/metabolism*; Kidney Neoplasms/pathology
  18. Ishak AI, Md Pauzi SH, Masir N, Goh BS
    Malays J Med Sci, 2010 Oct;17(4):71-4.
    PMID: 22135565 MyJurnal
    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) presenting with multiple deposits in the head and neck region is unusual. It is not uncommon for a RCC to metastasise to a distant site after years of a tumour-free period, but most of it would be expected to have a single site of deposit. We report a rare case of a patient who had a nephrectomy 10 years earlier for RCC and presented with tumours in the frontal sinus and posterior pharyngeal wall. Radiological imaging and histology confirmed metastatic RCC at both sites.
    Matched MeSH terms: Kidney Neoplasms
  19. Sasongko TH, Ismail NF, Zabidi-Hussin Z
    Cochrane Database Syst Rev, 2016 Jul 13;7:CD011272.
    PMID: 27409709 DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD011272.pub2
    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown potential benefits of rapamycin or rapalogs for treating people with tuberous sclerosis complex. Although everolimus (a rapalog) is currently approved by the FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration) and the EMA (European Medicines Agency) for tuberous sclerosis complex-associated renal angiomyolipoma and subependymal giant cell astrocytoma, applications for other manifestations of tuberous sclerosis complex have not yet been established. A systematic review is necessary to establish the clinical value of rapamycin or rapalogs for various manifestations in tuberous sclerosis complex.

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the effectiveness of rapamycin or rapalogs in people with tuberous sclerosis complex for decreasing tumour size and other manifestations and to assess the safety of rapamycin or rapalogs in relation to their adverse effects.

    SEARCH METHODS: Relevant studies were identified by authors from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Ovid MEDLINE, and clinicaltrials.gov. Relevant resources were also searched by the authors, such as conference proceedings and abstract books of conferences, from e.g. the Tuberous Sclerosis Complex International Research Conferences, other tuberous sclerosis complex-related conferences and the Human Genome Meeting. We did not restrict the searches by language as long as English translations were available for non-English reports.Date of the last searches: 14 March 2016.

    SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomized or quasi-randomized studies of rapamycin or rapalogs in people with tuberous sclerosis complex.

    DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Data were independently extracted by two authors using standard acquisition forms. The data collection was verified by one author. The risk of bias of each study was independently assessed by two authors and verified by one author.

    MAIN RESULTS: Three placebo-controlled studies with a total of 263 participants (age range 0.8 to 61 years old, 122 males and 141 females, with variable lengths of study duration) were included in the review. We found high-quality evidence except for response to skin lesions which was judged to be low quality due to the risk of attrition bias. Overall, there are 175 participants in the treatment arm (rapamycin or everolimus) and 88 in the placebo arm. Participants all had tuberous sclerosis complex as proven by consensus diagnostic criteria as a minimum. The quality in the description of the study methods was mixed, although we assessed most domains as having a low risk of bias. Blinding of treatment arms was successfully carried out in all of the studies. However, two studies did not report allocation concealment. Two of the included studies were funded by Novartis Pharmaceuticals.Two studies (235 participants) used oral (systemic) administration of everolimus (rapalog). These studies reported response to tumour size in terms of the number of individuals with a reduction in the total volume of tumours to 50% or more relative to baseline. Significantly more participants in the treatment arm (two studies, 162 participants, high quality evidence) achieved a 50% reduction in renal angiomyolipoma size, risk ratio 24.69 (95% confidence interval 3.51 to 173.41) (P = 0.001). For the sub-ependymal giant cell astrocytoma, our analysis of one study (117 participants, high quality evidence) showed significantly more participants in the treatment arm achieved a 50% reduction in tumour size, risk ratio 27.85 (95% confidence interval 1.74 to 444.82) (P = 0.02). The proportion of participants who showed a skin response from the two included studies analysed was significantly increased in the treatment arms, risk ratio 5.78 (95% confidence interval 2.30 to 14.52) (P = 0.0002) (two studies, 224 participants, high quality evidence). In one study (117 participants), the median change of seizure frequency was -2.9 in 24 hours (95% confidence interval -4.0 to -1.0) in the treatment group versus -4.1 in 24 hour (95% confidence interval -10.9 to 5.8) in the placebo group. In one study, one out of 79 participants in the treatment group versus three of 39 in placebo group had increased blood creatinine levels, while the median percentage change of forced expiratory volume at one second in the treatment arm was -1% compared to -4% in the placebo arm. In one study (117 participants, high quality evidence), we found that those participants who received treatment had a similar risk of experiencing adverse events compared to those who did not, risk ratio 1.07 (95% confidence interval 0.96 - 1.20) (P = 0.24). However, as seen from two studies (235 participants, high quality evidence), the treatment itself led to significantly more adverse events resulting in withdrawal, interruption of treatment, or reduction in dose level, risk ratio 3.14 (95% confidence interval 1.82 to 5.42) (P < 0.0001).One study (28 participants) used topical (skin) administration of rapamycin. This study reported response to skin lesions in terms of participants' perception towards their skin appearance following the treatment. There was a tendency of an improvement in the participants' perception of their skin appearance, although not significant, risk ratio 1.81 (95% confidence interval 0.80 to 4.06, low quality evidence) (P = 0.15). This study reported that there were no serious adverse events related to the study product and there was no detectable systemic absorption of the rapamycin during the study period.

    AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: We found evidence that oral everolimus significantly increased the proportion of people who achieved a 50% reduction in the size of sub-ependymal giant cell astrocytoma and renal angiomyolipoma. Although we were unable to ascertain the relationship between the reported adverse events and the treatment, participants who received treatment had a similar risk of experiencing adverse events as compared to those who did not receive treatment. Nevertheless, the treatment itself significantly increased the risk of having dose reduction, interruption or withdrawal. This supports ongoing clinical applications of oral everolimus for renal angiomyolipoma and subependymal giant cell astrocytoma. Although oral everolimus showed beneficial effect on skin lesions, topical rapamycin only showed a non-significant tendency of improvement. Efficacy on skin lesions should be further established in future research. The beneficial effects of rapamycin or rapalogs on tuberous sclerosis complex should be further studied on other manifestations of the condition.

    Matched MeSH terms: Kidney Neoplasms/drug therapy*; Kidney Neoplasms/pathology
  20. Wong KT, Khir AS, Noori S, Peh SC
    Aust N Z J Surg, 1994 Feb;64(2):128-9.
    PMID: 8291977
    Matched MeSH terms: Kidney Neoplasms/pathology
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