Displaying publications 1 - 20 of 61 in total

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  1. Ampomah K, Amano S, Wages NP, Volz L, Clift R, Ludin AFM, et al.
    Med Sci Sports Exerc, 2019 Mar 19.
    PMID: 30913160 DOI: 10.1249/MSS.0000000000001984
    PURPOSE: The goal of this trial was to determine whether low-load blood flow restricted (BFR) exercise of appendicular muscles induces a cross-transfer of effect to the trunk extensor (TE) muscles, such that low-load TE exercise would enhance TE size and function to a greater extent than standard low-load exercise in people with recurrent low back pain (LBP). We also investigated the direct effects of BFR exercise in the appendicular muscles.

    METHODS: 32 adults with recurrent, non-specific LBP were randomized into two groups: Appendicular BFR Exercise (BFR Exercise) or Control Exercise (CON Exercise). All participants trained (2x/week) for 10-weeks, with a 12-week follow-up. Participants performed three sets of leg extension (LE), plantar flexion (PF), and elbow flexion (EF) exercises followed by low-load TE exercise without BFR. Outcome measures included MRI-derived muscle size (quadriceps and TE), strength (LE, PF, EF, and TE), and endurance (LE and TE).

    RESULTS: There was no evidence for a cross-transfer of effect to the trunk extensors. There was also no statistically significant enhancement of limb skeletal muscle size or function of BFR relative to CON Exercise at any time point; though, moderate effect sizes for BFR exercise were observed for enhanced muscle size and strength in the leg extensors.

    CONCLUSIONS: Low-load BFR exercise of the appendicular muscles did not result in a cross-transfer of effect to the TE musculature. There was also no significant benefit of low-load BFR exercise on the appendicular muscle size and function, suggesting no benefit from low-load BFR exercise in adults with recurrent, non-specific LBP.This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 (CCBY), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

    Matched MeSH terms: Low Back Pain
  2. Awang Lukman K, Jeffree MS, Rampal KG
    Int J Occup Saf Ergon, 2019 Mar;25(1):8-16.
    PMID: 28978270 DOI: 10.1080/10803548.2017.1388571
    A cross-sectional study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of lower back pain (LBP) and its association with whole-body vibration (WBV) and manual materials handling (MMH). We studied 110 commercial vehicle drivers using a self-administered questionnaire and the VI-400Pro human vibration monitor. Prevalence of LBP was 66.4%. The percentage of drivers who had frequent manual handling of heavy loads was 45.5% and those who handled heavy loads in awkward postures accounted for 86.4%. Daily vibration A(8) averaged on the z axis was 0.25 (0.06) m·s-2 and at vector sum was 0.29 (0.07) m·s-2. Daily vibration exposures on the z axis, frequent manual handling of heavy loads and awkward posture during MMH were significantly associated with LBP. Drivers who are exposed to WBV and frequently handle heavy loads manually and with awkward postures probably have more LBP than drivers who are exposed to only one of these risk factors.
    Matched MeSH terms: Low Back Pain/epidemiology*
  3. Labao HC, Faller EM, Bacayo MFD
    Ann Glob Health, 2018 Aug 31;84(3):474-480.
    PMID: 30835403 DOI: 10.29024/aogh.2331
    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are alarmingly high among migrant workers in Malaysia. MSDs are the most prevalent occupational-related conditions in most parts of the world affecting function, productivity and overall health-related quality of life. Therefore, this study aims to determine the profile of Filipino migrant workers in Malaysia and their various musculoskeletal complaints.

    METHOD: This study utilized a quantitative, nonexperimental, cross-sectional research design. A total of 60 subjects were randomly selected after passing the study's sampling criteria. The Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) was to used to determine common MSDs affecting the various regions in the body. The Demographic Pofile Sheet was provided to gather a subject's demographic characteristics.

    RESULTS: Filipino migrant workers mostly complain of pain in the low back area (60%) and shoulder pain (60%), followed by pain in the upper back (48.3%) and neck pain (45%) in the last 12 months. Household workers accounting for 73.3% of the subjects commonly complain of pain in the hips/thighs (78.9%), while workers in the service industry commonly complain of knee pain (39.1%).

    CONCLUSIONS: Results imply that Filipino migrant workers have a higher prevalence of shoulder and lower back pain in the last 12 months. Household workers are more susceptible to hip/thigh pain. Interventions focusing on ergonomics policy implementation, education on posture and lifting techniques and physical function is recommended. Further studies should consider the psychological and psychosocial aspects of migrant employment, which are known risk factors for MSDs.

    Matched MeSH terms: Low Back Pain
  4. Sanjeevan R, Prabu S, Azizul A, Abdul-Halim Y
    Malays Orthop J, 2018 Jul;12(2):56-58.
    PMID: 30112131 MyJurnal DOI: 10.5704/MOJ.1807.011
    Being a rare clinical entity, discal cyst presents indistinguishably from other causes of lower back pain and radiculopathy. It is an extremely rare pathology with unclear pathogenesis, indeterminate natural history with no consensus on the ideal management of the condition. We report a rare case of discal cyst in a patient who presented to our centre with localised low back pain and subsequently left sided radicular pain. With the aid of MRI and with clear surgical indication we proceeded with endoscopic removal of the cyst and intraoperatively confirmed its origin from the adjacent disc. The patient had immediate relief of his symptoms and no postoperative complications. We recommend that endoscopic surgery can be an effective alternative to conventional open surgery for discal cyst of the lumbar spine.
    Matched MeSH terms: Low Back Pain
  5. Mohan V, Paungmali A, Sitilerpisan P, Hashim UF, Mazlan MB, Nasuha TN
    Nurs Health Sci, 2018 Jun;20(2):224-230.
    PMID: 29421851 DOI: 10.1111/nhs.12406
    Non-specific low back pain (NS-LBP) is known to cause respiratory dysfunction. In this study, we investigated alterations in breathing, respiratory strength and endurance, core stability, diaphragm mobility, and chest expansion among patients with NS-LBP and healthy individuals. The specific aim of the study was to correlate between respiratory function and other variables among NS-LBP patients. Thirty four patients with NS-LBP were matched with 34 healthy participants before undergoing total faulty breathing scale, spirometer, respiratory pressure meter, chest expansion, ultrasound, and pressure biofeedback measurements. There were signs of faulty breathing in the NS-LBP patients when compared to the healthy participants. Diaphragmatic mobility and respiratory muscle endurance were lower in the NS-LBP group. Chest expansion exhibited a significant decrease at the level of the fourth intercostal space in the NS-LBP group, but respiratory muscle strength and core stability were not significant between the two groups. Positive correlations were found to be fairly significant regarding respiratory muscle strength. The findings of this study indicated altered respiratory characteristics in the NS-LBP patients, and suggested that they would improve through respiratory exercises.
    Matched MeSH terms: Low Back Pain/classification*
  6. Hani SS, Liew SM
    Malays Fam Physician, 2018;13(1):18-27.
    PMID: 29796206 MyJurnal
    Background: Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a common and often difficult to treat condition in the primary care setting. Research involving in-depth exploration on the views and experiences faced by primary care doctors in managing patients with CLBP in Malaysia is limited.

    Objective: To explore the primary care practitioners' views and experiences in managing patients with CLBP.

    Study design: A qualitative approach was employed using focus group discussions (FGD) at an academic primary care clinic in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Twenty-three primary care doctors were purposively selected. Data were collected through audio-recorded interviews, which were transcribed verbatim and checked for accuracy. Data saturation was reached by the third FGD. An additional FGD was included to ensure completeness. A thematic approach using the one sheet of paper (OSOP) method was used to analyse the data.

    Results: Participants view managing patients with CLBP as challenging. This is mainly due to the difficulty in balancing the doctors' expectations with the patients' perceived expectations during consultation. Barriers identified include lack of awareness and conflicting views regarding the usefulness of the local clinical practice guideline (CPG) in clinical practice. Other barriers include time constraints and perceived lack of support from multidisciplinary teams in managing these patients.

    Conclusion: Managing patients with CLBP is still a challenge for Malaysian primary care doctors. Any intervention should target identified barriers to improve the management of patients with CLBP.
    Matched MeSH terms: Low Back Pain
  7. Lim E, Lim R, Suhaimi A, Chan BT, Wahab AKA
    J Back Musculoskelet Rehabil, 2018;31(6):1041-1047.
    PMID: 30149436 DOI: 10.3233/BMR-171042
    BACKGROUND: Low frequency sound wave stimulation therapy has become increasingly popular in the rehabilitation fields, due to its ease, less fatiguing and time efficient application.

    OBJECTIVE: This 12-week pilot study examines the efficacy of applying low frequency sound wave stimulation (between 16-160 Hz) through both hands and feet on relieving pain and improving functional ability in patients with chronic back pain.

    METHODS: Twenty-three participants with chronic shoulder (eleven participants) or low back pain (twelve participants) underwent a 12-week vibration therapy program of three sessions per week. A low frequency sound wave device comprising four piezoelectric vibration-type tactile tranducers enclosed in separate 5-cm diameter circular plates, which generate sinusoidal vibratory stimuli at a frequency of 16-160 Hz, was used in this study. Primary outcome measure was pain sensation measured using the Visual Analogue Scale (P-VAS). The secondary outcome measures were pain-related disability measured using the pain disability index (PDI) and quality of life measured using the SF-12.

    RESULTS: At week 12, significant reductions in pain sensation and pain-related disability were observed, with mean reductions of 3.5 points in P-VAS and 13.5 points in the PDI scores. Sixty-five percent of the participants had a reduction of at least 3 points on the P-VAS score, while 52% participants showed a decrease of at least 10 points in the PDI score. Significant improvement was observed in the SF-12 physical composite score but not the mental composite score.

    CONCLUSIONS: The preliminary findings showed that passive application of low frequency sound wave stimulation therapy through both hands and feet was effective in alleviating pain and improving functional ability in patients with chronic back pain.

    Matched MeSH terms: Low Back Pain
  8. Nor Dalila Marican, Rozita Hod, Nadiah Wan-Arfah, Azmi Hassan
    Int J Public Health Res, 2018;8(1):933-938.
    MyJurnal
    Introduction Non-specific low back pain is one of the most common physical ailments
    affecting millions of people worldwide. This condition constitutes a
    significant public health problem and was listed as a prevalent health
    complaint in most societies. Even though there are many anecdotal claims
    for reflexology in the treatment of various conditions such as a migraine,
    arthritis and multiple sclerosis, but very little clinical evidence exists for
    reflexology on the management of low back pain per se. This study aims to
    evaluate the effects of foot reflexology therapy as an adjunctive treatment to
    the Malaysian low back pain standard care in relieving pain and promoting
    health-related quality of life among people with non-specific low back pain.
    Methods This is a parallel randomized controlled trial with pre and post-treatment
    study design. The study setting for the intervention located at Penawar
    Reflexology Center, Kuala Terengganu, Malaysia. A total of 100
    participants with non-specific low back pain will be allocated to one of two
    groups, using a randomization computer program of Research Randomizer.
    The control group will receive low back pain standard care, while the
    intervention group will receive standard care plus eight sessions of foot
    reflexology therapy. The pain intensity and health-related quality of life
    scores will be measured using Visual Analogue Scale and Euro-quality of
    life scale respectively in both groups. The study was approved by the
    Human Research Ethics Committee of University Sultan Zainal Abidin
    (UHREC/2016/2/011). The study protocol was registered at
    ClinicalTrials.gov, with the ID number of NCT02887430.
    Measurements Outcome measures will be undertaken at pre-intervention (week 1), postintervention
    (week 6) and follow-up (week 10).
    Conclusions This will be the first trial to compare the foot reflexology therapy with
    control group among people who medically diagnosed with non-specific low
    back pain in Malaysia. The result of this study will contribute to better
    management of this population, especially for Malaysia healthcare setting.
    Matched MeSH terms: Low Back Pain
  9. Paungmali A, Joseph LH, Sitilertpisan P, Pirunsan U, Uthaikhup S
    Pain Pract, 2017 11;17(8):1008-1014.
    PMID: 28042685 DOI: 10.1111/papr.12552
    BACKGROUND: Lumbopelvic stabilization training (LPST) may provide therapeutic benefits on pain modulation in chronic nonspecific low back pain conditions. This study aimed to examine the effects of LPST on pain threshold and pain intensity in comparison with the passive automated cycling intervention and control intervention among patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain.

    METHODS: A within-subject, repeated-measures, crossover randomized controlled design was conducted among 25 participants (7 males and 18 females) with chronic nonspecific low back pain. All the participants received 3 different types of experimental interventions, which included LPST, the passive automated cycling intervention, and the control intervention randomly, with 48 hours between the sessions. The pressure pain threshold (PPT), hot-cold pain threshold, and pain intensity were estimated before and after the interventions.

    RESULTS: Repeated-measures analysis of variance showed that LPST provided therapeutic effects as it improved the PPT beyond the placebo and control interventions (P < 0.01). The pain intensity under the LPST condition was significantly better than that under the passive automated cycling intervention and controlled intervention (P < 0.001). Heat pain threshold under the LPST condition also showed a significant trend of improvement beyond the control (P < 0.05), but no significant effects on cold pain threshold were evident.

    CONCLUSIONS: Lumbopelvic stabilization training may provide therapeutic effects by inducing pain modulation through an improvement in the pain threshold and reduction in pain intensity. LPST may be considered as part of the management programs for treatment of chronic low back pain.

    Matched MeSH terms: Low Back Pain/rehabilitation*
  10. Lim SW, Lim HY, Kannaiah T, Zuki Z
    Malays Orthop J, 2017 Nov;11(3):50-52.
    PMID: 29326768 MyJurnal DOI: 10.5704/MOJ.1711.004
    Streptococcus constellatus is an extremely rare cause of pyogenic spondylodiscitis. Literature search yielded only one case report in an elderly 72 years old man with spontaneous T10-T11 S. constellatus spondylodiscitis. It is virtually unheard of in young teenage. We report the case of a 14 years old male teenager who presented with worsening low back pain for one year with no neurological deficit. Imaging studies were consistent with features of L4-L5 spondylodiscitis. CT guided biopsy grew a pure culture of streptococcus constellatus sensitive to penicillin and erythromycin. He showed full recovery with six weeks of intravenous antibiotics. Due to the insidious onset, this case highlight the importance of high clinical suspicion and early diagnosis, with image guided biopsy followed by treatment with appropriate intravenous antibiotics to enable full recovery without further neurological deterioration.
    Matched MeSH terms: Low Back Pain
  11. Shariat A, Cleland JA, Danaee M, Kargarfard M, Sangelaji B, Tamrin SBM
    Braz J Phys Ther, 2017 09 06;22(2):144-153.
    PMID: 28939263 DOI: 10.1016/j.bjpt.2017.09.003
    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of exercise, ergonomic modification, and a combination of training exercise and ergonomic modification on the scores of pain in office workers with neck, shoulders, and lower back pain.

    METHODS: Participants (N=142) in this randomized controlled trial were office workers aged 20-50 years old with neck, shoulders, and lower back pain. They were randomly assigned to either the ergonomic modification group, the exercise group, the combined exercise and ergonomic modification group, or the control group (no-treatment). The exercise training group performed a series of stretching exercises, while the ergonomic group received some modification in the working place. Outcome measures were assessed by the Cornell Musculoskeletal Disorders Questionnaire at baseline, after 2, 4, and 6 months of intervention.

    RESULTS: There was significant differences in pain scores for neck (MD -10.55; 95%CI -14.36 to -6.74), right shoulder (MD -12.17; 95%CI -16.87 to -7.47), left shoulder (MD -11.1; 95%CI -15.1 to -7.09) and lower back (MD -7.8; 95%CI -11.08 to -4.53) between the exercise and control groups. Also, significant differences were seen in pain scores for neck (MD -9.99; 95%CI -13.63 to -6.36), right shoulder (MD -11.12; 95%CI -15.59 to -6.65), left shoulder (MD -10.67; 95%CI -14.49 to -6.85) and lower back (MD -6.87; 95%CI -10 to -3.74) between the combined exercise and ergonomic modification and control groups. The significant improvement from month 4 to 6, was only seen in exercise group (p<0.05).

    CONCLUSION: To have a long term effective on MSDs, physical therapists and occupational therapists should use stretching exercises in their treatment programs rather than solely rely on ergonomic modification.

    CLINICAL TRIAL ID: NCT02874950 - https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02874950.

    Matched MeSH terms: Low Back Pain/rehabilitation*
  12. Hanifah J, Joehaimey J, Yusof MI
    Malays Orthop J, 2017 Jul;11(2):85-88.
    PMID: 29021888 MyJurnal DOI: 10.5704/MOJ.1707.018
    Spinal epidural abscess is a severe, generally pyogenic, infection of the epidural space of spinal cord or cauda equina. The swelling caused by the abscess leads to compression or vascular disruption of neurological structures that requires urgent surgical decompression to avoid significant permanent disability. We share a rare case of Klebsiella pneumoniae spinal epidural abscess secondary to haematogenous spread of previous lung infection that presented late at our centre with cauda equina syndrome that showed good short-term outcome in delayed decompression. A 50-year old female presented with one-week history of persistent low back pain with progressively worsening bilateral lower limb weakness for seven days and urinary retention associated with saddle anesthesia of 2-day duration. Magnetic resonance imaging with contrast of the lumbo-sacral region showed an intramuscular collection of abscess at left gluteus maximus and left multifidus muscle with a L3-L5 posteriorly placed extradural lesion enhancing peripherally on contrast, suggestive of epidural abscess that compressed the cauda equina. The pus was drained using the posterior lumbar approach. Tissue and pus culture revealed Klebsiella pneumoniae, suggestive of bacterial infection. The patient made immediate improvement of muscle power over bilateral lower limbs postoperative followed by ability to control micturition and defecation the 4th post-operative day. A good short-term outcome in delayed decompression of cauda equine syndrome is extremely rare. Aggressive surgical decompression combined with antibiotic therapy led to good short-term outcome in this patient despite delayed decompression of more than 48 hours.
    Matched MeSH terms: Low Back Pain
  13. Behera G, Poduval M, Patro DK, Sahoo S
    Malays Orthop J, 2017 Jul;11(2):68-71.
    PMID: 29021883 DOI: 10.5704/MOJ.1707.009
    Brodie's abscess is a variety of subacute osteomyelitis with a long duration of presentation and intermittent pain. It usually involves the metaphyseal region of long bones of the lower limbs. Brodie's abscess of pelvic bone is very rare. Involvement of posterior ilium with gluteal syndrome is extremely unusual and can be easily missed or misdiagnosed. We present a 9-year old boy who reported to us with intermittent low back pain of three months duration without any other constitutional symptoms. Clinically, there was mild tenderness over the posterior ilium. Computed tomography showed a lytic lesion in the posterior ilium with a breach in the outer cortex. MRI and bone scan were suggestive of inflammatory pathology. Keeping infective, tubercular and benign bone tumors as differential diagnoses, open biopsy and curettage were done. Staphylococcus aureus was cultured and histopathology was suggestive of osteomyelitis. The patient received appropriate antibiotics for six weeks. He was asymptomatic till 18 months of follow up without any recurrence. We present this case because of its rarity and unusual presentation as gluteal syndrome and low back pain, and its resemblance to other pelvic and sacroiliac joint pathologies which are often missed or misdiagnosed in paediatric patients.

    Study done in India
    Matched MeSH terms: Low Back Pain
  14. Coggon D, Ntani G, Walker-Bone K, Palmer KT, Felli VE, Harari R, et al.
    Spine, 2017 May 15;42(10):740-747.
    PMID: 27820794 DOI: 10.1097/BRS.0000000000001956
    STUDY DESIGN: A cross-sectional survey with a longitudinal follow-up.

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that pain, which is localized to the low back, differs epidemiologically from that which occurs simultaneously or close in time to pain at other anatomical sites SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA.: Low back pain (LBP) often occurs in combination with other regional pain, with which it shares similar psychological and psychosocial risk factors. However, few previous epidemiological studies of LBP have distinguished pain that is confined to the low back from that which occurs as part of a wider distribution of pain.

    METHODS: We analyzed data from CUPID, a cohort study that used baseline and follow-up questionnaires to collect information about musculoskeletal pain, associated disability, and potential risk factors, in 47 occupational groups (office workers, nurses, and others) from 18 countries.

    RESULTS: Among 12,197 subjects at baseline, 609 (4.9%) reported localized LBP in the past month, and 3820 (31.3%) nonlocalized LBP. Nonlocalized LBP was more frequently associated with sciatica in the past month (48.1% vs. 30.0% of cases), occurred on more days in the past month and past year, was more often disabling for everyday activities (64.1% vs. 47.3% of cases), and had more frequently led to medical consultation and sickness absence from work. It was also more often persistent when participants were followed up after a mean of 14 months (65.6% vs. 54.1% of cases). In adjusted Poisson regression analyses, nonlocalized LBP was differentially associated with risk factors, particularly female sex, older age, and somatizing tendency. There were also marked differences in the relative prevalence of localized and nonlocalized LBP by occupational group.

    CONCLUSION: Future epidemiological studies should distinguish where possible between pain that is limited to the low back and LBP that occurs in association with pain at other anatomical locations.

    LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 2.

    Matched MeSH terms: Low Back Pain/diagnosis; Low Back Pain/epidemiology*
  15. Kew Y, Tan CY, Ng CJ, Thang SS, Tan LH, Khoo YK, et al.
    Rheumatol. Int., 2017 Apr;37(4):633-639.
    PMID: 28013358 DOI: 10.1007/s00296-016-3633-x
    The prevalence of neuropathic low back pain differs in different ethnic populations. The aims of the study are to determine its frequency and associations in a multi-ethnic cohort of Asian low back pain patients. This was a cross-sectional study of low back patients seen at the University of Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Neuropathic low back pain patients were identified using the painDETECT questionnaire and compared with non-neuropathic (unclear or nociceptive) low back pain patients, in terms of socio-demographic and clinical factors, pain severity (numerical pain rating scale, NPRS), disability (Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire, RMDQ), as well as anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, HADS). Of 210 patients, 26 (12.4%) have neuropathic low back pain. Neuropathic pain is associated with non-Chinese ethnicity, higher body mass index and pain radiation below the knee. Patients with neuropathic pain have significantly higher NPRS and RMDQ scores, and there are more subjects with anxiety on HADS. However, there are no differences between the groups in age, gender, pain duration or underlying diagnosis of low back pain. The prevalence of neuropathic low back pain in a multi-ethnic Malaysian cohort is lower than previously reported in other populations with possible differences between ethnic groups. It is associated with greater pain severity, disability and anxiety.
    Matched MeSH terms: Low Back Pain/epidemiology*; Low Back Pain/psychology
  16. Amin OS
    BMJ Case Rep, 2017 Feb 28;2017.
    PMID: 28246115 DOI: 10.1136/bcr-2016-219119
    Matched MeSH terms: Low Back Pain/etiology
  17. Zamri EN, Moy FM, Hoe VC
    PLoS ONE, 2017;12(2):e0172195.
    PMID: 28234933 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0172195
    BACKGROUND: Musculoskeletal pain is common among teachers. Work-related psychosocial factors are found to be associated with the development of musculoskeletal pain, however psychological distress may also play an important role.

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the prevalence of self-reported low back pain (LBP), and neck and/or shoulder pain (NSP) among secondary school teachers; and to evaluate the association of LBP and NSP with psychological distress and work-related psychosocial factors.

    METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study conducted among teachers in the state of Penang, Malaysia. The participants were recruited via a two stage sampling method. Information on demographic, psychological distress, work-related psychosocial factors, and musculoskeletal pain (LBP and NSP) in the past 12 months was collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Poisson regression was used to estimate the prevalence ratio (PR) for the associations between psychological distress and work-related psychosocial factors with LBP and NSP.

    RESULTS: The prevalence of self-reported LBP and NSP among 1482 teachers in the past 12 months was 48.0% (95% Confidence Interval (CI) 45.2%, 50.9%) and 60.1% (95% CI 57.4%, 62.9%) respectively. From the multivariate analysis, self-reported LBP was associated with teachers who reported severe to extremely severe depression (PR: 1.71, 95% CI 1.25, 2.32), severe to extremely severe anxiety (1.46, 95% CI 1.22, 1.75), high psychological job demand (1.29, 95% CI 1.06, 1.57), low skill discretion (1.28, 95% CI 1.13, 1.47) and poorer mental health (0.98, 95% CI 0.97, 0.99). Self-reported NSP was associated with mild to moderate anxiety (1.18, 95% CI 1.06, 1.33), severe to extremely severe anxiety (1.25, 95% CI 1.09, 1.43), low supervisory support (1.13, 95% CI 1.03, 1.25) and poorer mental health (0.98, 95% CI 0.97, 0.99).

    CONCLUSIONS: Self-reported LBP and NSP were common among secondary school teachers. Interventions targeting psychological distress and work-related psychosocial characteristics may reduce musculoskeletal pain among school teachers.

    Matched MeSH terms: Low Back Pain
  18. Madhwani KP, Nag PK
    Indian J Occup Environ Med, 2017 Jan-Apr;21(1):18-22.
    PMID: 29391743 DOI: 10.4103/ijoem.IJOEM_145_17
    Aims: The purpose of this study was to evaluate web-based Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP) intervention on office ergonomics - a unique method for prevention of musculoskeletal discomfort (MSD) - in corporate offices that influences behavior modification.

    Background: With the increasing use of computers, laptops and hand-held communication devices globally among office employees, creating awareness on office ergonomics has become a top priority. Emphasis needs to be given on maintaining ideal work postures, ergonomic arrangement of workstations, optimizing chair functions, as well as performing desk stretches to reduce MSD arising from the use of these equipment, thereby promoting safe work practices at offices and home, as in the current scenario many employees work from home with flexible work hours. Hence, this justifies the importance of our study.

    Objective: To promote safe working by exploring cost-effective communication methods to achieve behavior change at distant sites when an on-site visit may not be feasible.

    Materials and Methods: An invitation was sent by the Medical and Occupational Health Team of a multinational corporation to all employees at their offices in Sri Lanka, Singapore, and Malaysia to take up an online Nordic questionnaire, a screening tool for musculoskeletal symptoms, shared in local languages on two occasions - baseline evaluation (n = 240) and a follow-up evaluation after 3 months (n = 203). After completing the baseline questionnaire, employees were immediately trained on correct postures and office ergonomics with animation graphics. The same questionnaire was sent again after a 12-week gap only to those employees who responded to the baseline questionnaire on initial assessment.

    Statistical Analysis Used: Data collected were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20.0 software and variables were compared using odds ratio as well as Chi-square test.

    Results: Of the 203 employees who responded, 47.35% had some musculoskeletal symptoms. Among them 58.7% had lower back pain, 46.9% had upper back pain, 44.1% had wrist pain, 39.5% had shoulder pain, and 37% had knee pain. The percentages are high as some participants had multiple complaints i.e. 2 or 3 complaints. However, only 40% of these employees had ongoing symptoms at the time of evaluation (past 7 days). A subsequent 3-month evaluation after web-based intervention showed a significant 41-50% decline in ongoing symptoms.

    Conclusions: We conclude that newer technology using web-based animation graphics is a highly efficient technique to create office ergonomics awareness and has the potential to become a best practice in countries where language is a communication barrier and an on-site visit may not be feasible due to meagre resources.
    Matched MeSH terms: Low Back Pain
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