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  1. von Stumm S, Chamorro-Premuzic T, Furnham A
    Br J Psychol, 2009 May;100(Pt 2):429-42.
    PMID: 18851768 DOI: 10.1348/000712608X357876
    This study examines the structure of self-estimates of intelligence (SEI) across 12 nations (Australia, Austria, Brazil, France, Iran, Israel, Malaysia, South Africa, Spain, Turkey, UK and US). Participants rated themselves on general and specific abilities from three popular models of intelligence: Gardner's multiple intelligences, Sternberg's triarchic theory of intelligence, and Goleman's emotional intelligence. The results showed that (a) laypeople across nations have similar and invariant concepts of intelligence, (b) concepts of intelligence are cross-culturally closely related to academic notions of intellectual ability and (c) sex differences in general and specific SEI favouring men are consistent across countries. Male hubris and female humility in SEI seem independent of sex differences in actual cognitive ability and national levels of masculinity-femininity. Furthermore, international mean differences in general SEI could not be attributed to discrepancies in national intelligence quotient (IQ) levels or to cultural variations.
    Matched MeSH terms: Middle Aged
  2. van Roekel EH, Trijsburg L, Assi N, Carayol M, Achaintre D, Murphy N, et al.
    Nutrients, 2018 May 22;10(5).
    PMID: 29789452 DOI: 10.3390/nu10050654
    Identifying the metabolites associated with alcohol consumption may provide insights into the metabolic pathways through which alcohol may affect human health. We studied associations of alcohol consumption with circulating concentrations of 123 metabolites among 2974 healthy participants from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Alcohol consumption at recruitment was self-reported through dietary questionnaires. Metabolite concentrations were measured by tandem mass spectrometry (BIOCRATES AbsoluteIDQTM p180 kit). Data were randomly divided into discovery (2/3) and replication (1/3) sets. Multivariable linear regression models were used to evaluate confounder-adjusted associations of alcohol consumption with metabolite concentrations. Metabolites significantly related to alcohol intake in the discovery set (FDR q-value < 0.05) were further tested in the replication set (Bonferroni-corrected p-value < 0.05). Of the 72 metabolites significantly related to alcohol intake in the discovery set, 34 were also significant in the replication analysis, including three acylcarnitines, the amino acid citrulline, four lysophosphatidylcholines, 13 diacylphosphatidylcholines, seven acyl-alkylphosphatidylcholines, and six sphingomyelins. Our results confirmed earlier findings that alcohol consumption was associated with several lipid metabolites, and possibly also with specific acylcarnitines and amino acids. This provides further leads for future research studies aiming at elucidating the mechanisms underlying the effects of alcohol in relation to morbid conditions.
    Matched MeSH terms: Middle Aged
  3. van Langeveld AWB, Teo PS, Mars M, Feskens EJM, de Graaf C, de Vries JHM
    Eur J Clin Nutr, 2019 01;73(1):132-140.
    PMID: 30254242 DOI: 10.1038/s41430-018-0300-1
    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Taste is of key importance in food choice and dietary patterns, but studies on taste profiles are limited. We previously assessed dietary taste patterns by 24 h recalls (24hR), but for epidemiological studies food frequency questionnaires (FFQ) may also be suitable. This study compared dietary taste patterns based on FFQ against 24hR and biomarkers of exposure.

    SUBJECTS/METHODS: A taste database including 467 foods' sweet, sour, bitter, salt, umami and fat sensation values was combined with food intake data to assess dietary taste patterns: the contribution to energy intake of 6 taste clusters. The FFQ's reliability was assessed against 3-d 24hR and urinary biomarkers for sodium (Na) and protein intake (N) in Dutch men (n = 449) and women (n = 397) from the NQplus validation study (mean age 53 ± 11 y, BMI 26 ± 4 kg/m2).

    RESULTS: Correlations of dietary taste patterns ranged from 0.39-0.68 between FFQ and 24hR (p 

    Matched MeSH terms: Middle Aged
  4. van Enter BJD, Lau YL, Ling CL, Watthanaworawit W, Sukthana Y, Lee WC, et al.
    Am J Trop Med Hyg, 2017 Jul;97(1):232-235.
    PMID: 28719309 DOI: 10.4269/ajtmh.16-0999
    Toxoplasma gondii primary infection in pregnancy is associated with poor obstetric outcomes. This study aimed to determine the seroprevalence of Toxoplasma infection in pregnant migrant and refugee women from Myanmar attending antenatal care in Thailand. A random selection of 199 residual blood samples from first antenatal screen in 2014-2015 was tested for Toxoplasma IgG and IgM antibodies. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma infection was 31.7% (95% confidence interval = 25.6-38.4). Avidity testing in the three positive IgM cases indicated all were past infections. Multiparity (≥ 3 children) was significantly associated with higher Toxoplasma seropositivity rates. Seroprevalence of T. gondii infection in this pregnant population is similar to the only other report from Myanmar, where multiparity was also identified as a significant association. Toxoplasma infection is important in pregnant women. Nevertheless, in this marginalized population, this infection may be given less priority, due to resource constraints in providing the most basic components of safe motherhood programs.
    Matched MeSH terms: Middle Aged
  5. van Eekelen A, Stokvis-Brantsma H, Frölich M, Smelt AH, Stokvis H
    Diabetes Care, 2000 Sep;23(9):1435-6.
    PMID: 10977050
    Matched MeSH terms: Middle Aged
  6. van Duijnhoven FJB, Jenab M, Hveem K, Siersema PD, Fedirko V, Duell EJ, et al.
    Int J Cancer, 2018 03 15;142(6):1189-1201.
    PMID: 29114875 DOI: 10.1002/ijc.31146
    Evidence from in vivo, in vitro and ecological studies are suggestive of a protective effect of vitamin D against pancreatic cancer (PC). However, this has not been confirmed by analytical epidemiological studies. We aimed to examine the association between pre-diagnostic circulating vitamin D concentrations and PC incidence in European populations. We conducted a pooled nested case-control study within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) and the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study's second survey (HUNT2) cohorts. In total, 738 primary incident PC cases (EPIC n = 626; HUNT2 n = 112; median follow-up = 6.9 years) were matched to 738 controls. Vitamin D [25(OH)D2 and 25(OH)D3 combined] concentrations were determined using isotope-dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Conditional logistic regression models with adjustments for body mass index and smoking habits were used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI). Compared with a reference category of >50 to 75 nmol/L vitamin D, the IRRs (95% CIs) were 0.71 (0.42-1.20); 0.94 (0.72-1.22); 1.12 (0.82-1.53) and 1.26 (0.79-2.01) for clinically pre-defined categories of ≤25; >25 to 50; >75 to 100; and >100 nmol/L vitamin D, respectively (p for trend = 0.09). Corresponding analyses by quintiles of season-standardized vitamin D concentrations also did not reveal associations with PC risk (p for trend = 0.23). Although these findings among participants from the largest combination of European cohort studies to date show increasing effect estimates of PC risk with increasing pre-diagnostic concentrations of vitamin D, they are not statistically significant.
    Matched MeSH terms: Middle Aged
  7. van Dongen MC, Wijckmans-Duysens NEG, den Biggelaar LJ, Ocké MC, Meijboom S, Brants HA, et al.
    Nutrition, 2019 06;62:39-46.
    PMID: 30826598 DOI: 10.1016/j.nut.2018.10.015
    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to develop and validate a comprehensive food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) for The Maastricht Study, a population-based prospective cohort study in Maastricht, The Netherlands.

    METHODS: Item selection for the FFQ was based on explained variation and contribution to intake of energy and 24 nutrients. For validation, the FFQ was completed by 135 participants (25-70 y of age) of the Nutrition Questionnaires plus study. Per person, on average 2.8 (range 1-5) telephone-based 24-h dietary recalls (24HRs), two 24-h urinary samples, and one blood sample were available. Validity of 54 nutrients and 22 food groups was assessed by ranking agreement, correlation coefficients, attenuation factors, and ultimately deattenuated correlation coefficients (validity coefficients).

    RESULTS: Median correlation coefficients for energy and macronutrients, micronutrients, and food groups were 0.45, 0.36, and 0.38, respectively. Median deattenuated correlation coefficients were 0.53 for energy and macronutrients, 0.45 for micronutrients, and 0.64 for food groups, being >0.50 for 18 of 22 macronutrients, 16 of 30 micronutrients and >0.50 for 17 of 22 food groups. The FFQ underestimated protein and potassium intake compared with 24-h urinary nitrogen and potassium excretion by -18% and -2%, respectively. Correlation coefficients ranged from 0.50 and 0.55 for (fatty) fish intake and plasma eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, and from 0.26 to 0.42 between fruit and vegetable intake and plasma carotenoids.

    CONCLUSION: Overall, the validity of the 253-item Maastricht FFQ was satisfactory. The comprehensiveness of this FFQ make it well suited for use in The Maastricht Study and similar populations.

    Matched MeSH terms: Middle Aged
  8. ul Haq N, Hassali MA, Shafie AA, Saleem F, Aljadhey H
    PMID: 22866752 DOI: 10.1186/1477-7525-10-91
    The study aims to assess Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) among Hepatitis B (HB) patients and to identify significant predictors of the HRQoL in HB patients of Quetta, Pakistan.
    Matched MeSH terms: Middle Aged
  9. del Amo J, Moreno S, Bucher HC, Furrer H, Logan R, Sterne J, et al.
    Clin Infect Dis, 2012 May;54(9):1364-72.
    PMID: 22460971 DOI: 10.1093/cid/cis203
    BACKGROUND: The lower tuberculosis incidence reported in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals receiving combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) is difficult to interpret causally. Furthermore, the role of unmasking immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is unclear. We aim to estimate the effect of cART on tuberculosis incidence in HIV-positive individuals in high-income countries.

    METHODS: The HIV-CAUSAL Collaboration consisted of 12 cohorts from the United States and Europe of HIV-positive, ART-naive, AIDS-free individuals aged ≥18 years with baseline CD4 cell count and HIV RNA levels followed up from 1996 through 2007. We estimated hazard ratios (HRs) for cART versus no cART, adjusted for time-varying CD4 cell count and HIV RNA level via inverse probability weighting.

    RESULTS: Of 65 121 individuals, 712 developed tuberculosis over 28 months of median follow-up (incidence, 3.0 cases per 1000 person-years). The HR for tuberculosis for cART versus no cART was 0.56 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.44-0.72) overall, 1.04 (95% CI, 0.64-1.68) for individuals aged >50 years, and 1.46 (95% CI, 0.70-3.04) for people with a CD4 cell count of <50 cells/μL. Compared with people who had not started cART, HRs differed by time since cART initiation: 1.36 (95% CI, 0.98-1.89) for initiation <3 months ago and 0.44 (95% CI, 0.34-0.58) for initiation ≥3 months ago. Compared with people who had not initiated cART, HRs <3 months after cART initiation were 0.67 (95% CI, 0.38-1.18), 1.51 (95% CI, 0.98-2.31), and 3.20 (95% CI, 1.34-7.60) for people <35, 35-50, and >50 years old, respectively, and 2.30 (95% CI, 1.03-5.14) for people with a CD4 cell count of <50 cells/μL.

    CONCLUSIONS: Tuberculosis incidence decreased after cART initiation but not among people >50 years old or with CD4 cell counts of <50 cells/μL. Despite an overall decrease in tuberculosis incidence, the increased rate during 3 months of ART suggests unmasking IRIS.

    Matched MeSH terms: Middle Aged
  10. de Souza RJ, Dehghan M, Mente A, Bangdiwala SI, Ahmed SH, Alhabib KF, et al.
    Am J Clin Nutr, 2020 07 01;112(1):208-219.
    PMID: 32433740 DOI: 10.1093/ajcn/nqaa108
    BACKGROUND: The association of nuts with cardiovascular disease and deaths has been investigated mostly in Europe, the USA, and East Asia, with few data available from other regions of the world or from low- and middle-income countries.

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the association of nuts with mortality and cardiovascular disease (CVD).

    METHODS: The Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology study is a large multinational prospective cohort study of adults aged 35-70 y from 16 low-, middle-, and high-income countries on 5 continents. Nut intake (tree nuts and ground nuts) was measured at the baseline visit, using country-specific validated FFQs. The primary outcome was a composite of mortality or major cardiovascular event [nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, or heart failure].

    RESULTS: We followed 124,329 participants (age = 50.7 y, SD = 10.2; 41.5% male) for a median of 9.5 y. We recorded 10,928 composite events [deaths (n = 8,662) or major cardiovascular events (n = 5,979)]. Higher nut intake (>120 g per wk compared with <30 g per mo) was associated with a lower risk of the primary composite outcome of mortality or major cardiovascular event [multivariate HR (mvHR): 0.88; 95% CI: 0.80, 0.96; P-trend = 0.0048]. Significant reductions in total (mvHR: 0.77; 95% CI: 0.69, 0.87; P-trend <0.0001), cardiovascular (mvHR: 0.72; 95% CI: 0.56, 0.92; P-trend = 0.048), and noncardiovascular mortality (mvHR: 0.82; 95% CI: 0.70, 0.96; P-trend = 0.0046) with a trend to reduced cancer mortality (mvHR: 0.81; 95% CI: 0.65, 1.00; P-trend = 0.081) were observed. No significant associations of nuts were seen with major CVD (mvHR: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.81, 1.02; P-trend = 0.14), stroke (mvHR: 0.98; 95% CI: 0.84, 1.14; P-trend = 0.76), or MI (mvHR: 0.86; 95% CI: 0.72, 1.04; P-trend = 0.29).

    CONCLUSIONS: Higher nut intake was associated with lower mortality risk from both cardiovascular and noncardiovascular causes in low-, middle-, and high-income countries.

    Matched MeSH terms: Middle Aged
  11. de Carvalho LP, Gao F, Chen Q, Hartman M, Sim LL, Koh TH, et al.
    Eur Heart J Acute Cardiovasc Care, 2014 Dec;3(4):354-62.
    PMID: 24598820 DOI: 10.1177/2048872614527007
    the purpose of this study was to investigate differences in long-term mortality following acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in patients from three major ethnicities of Asia.
    Matched MeSH terms: Middle Aged
  12. de Carvalho LP, Fong A, Troughton R, Yan BP, Chin CT, Poh SC, et al.
    Thromb. Haemost., 2018 02;118(2):415-426.
    PMID: 29443374 DOI: 10.1160/TH17-08-0564
    Studies on platelet reactivity (PR) testing commonly test PR only after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has been performed. There are few data on pre- and post-PCI testing. Data on simultaneous testing of aspirin and adenosine diphosphate antagonist response are conflicting. We investigated the prognostic value of combined serial assessments of high on-aspirin PR (HASPR) and high on-adenosine diphosphate receptor antagonist PR (HADPR) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). HASPR and HADPR were assessed in 928 ACS patients before (initial test) and 24 hours after (final test) coronary angiography, with or without revascularization. Patients with HASPR on the initial test, compared with those without, had significantly higher intraprocedural thrombotic events (IPTE) (8.6 vs. 1.2%, p ≤ 0.001) and higher 30-day major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events (MACCE; 5.2 vs. 2.3%, p = 0.05), but not 12-month MACCE (13.0 vs. 15.1%, p = 0.50). Patients with initial HADPR, compared with those without, had significantly higher IPTE (4.4 vs. 0.9%, p = 0.004), but not 30-day (3.5 vs. 2.3%, p = 0.32) or 12-month MACCE (14.0 vs. 12.5%, p = 0.54). The c-statistic of the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) score alone, GRACE score + ASPR test and GRACE score + ADPR test for discriminating 30-day MACCE was 0.649, 0.803 and 0.757, respectively. Final ADPR was associated with 30-day MACCE among patients with intermediate-to-high GRACE score (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 4.50, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.14-17.66), but not low GRACE score (adjusted OR: 1.19, 95% CI: 0.13-10.79). In conclusion, both HASPR and HADPR predict ischaemic events in ACS. This predictive utility is time-dependent and risk-dependent.
    Matched MeSH terms: Middle Aged
  13. bte Abdul Rashid NH, Yunus MR, bte Baki MM, bte Ami M, Athar PP
    J Pak Med Assoc, 2012 May;62(5):466-9.
    PMID: 22755311
    To determine the frequency of stomal recurrence in patients following total laryngectomy in our center and to compare the frequency of previously reported risk factors such as preoperative tracheostomy, subglottic invasion and the level of lymph node metastases, with the rest of the world.
    Matched MeSH terms: Middle Aged
  14. bin Sabir Husin Athar PP, bte Ahmad Norhan N, bin Saim L, bin Md Rose I, bte Ramli R
    Ann Acad Med Singap, 2008 Sep;37(9):788-3.
    PMID: 18989497
    INTRODUCTION: Metastatic adenocarcinoma from the gastrointestinal tract to the sinonasal tract is rare. The histological morphology of this lesion is indistinguishable from the colonic variant of primary sinus adenocarcinoma or intestinal-type adenocarcinoma (ITAC).

    CLINICAL PICTURE: This is a report of a case of metastatic adenocarcinoma of colorectal origin to the paranasal sinuses in a 52-year-old female who was previously treated for adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon. A histologic study of the surgical specimen from the sinonasal cavity demonstrated a tumour identical to the patient's prior primary tumour of the colon. The sinonasal neoplastic tissue showed marked positivity for carcinoembryonic antigen and expressed cytokeratin 20, which differentiates metastatic colonic adenocarcinoma from ITAC.

    TREATMENT/OUTCOME: The patient received palliative radiation but died 3 months after the diagnosis.

    CONCLUSION: Distinguishing metastatic adenocarcinoma from gastrointestinal tract from ITAC can be difficult. In view of the resemblance, immunohistochemical staining can help in differentiating them. It is important to recognise these as metastatic lesions as the treatment is mainly palliative.

    Matched MeSH terms: Middle Aged
  15. Zyroul R, Hossain MG, Azura M, Abbas AA, Kamarul T
    Knee, 2014 Mar;21(2):557-62.
    PMID: 23473894 DOI: 10.1016/j.knee.2012.12.013
    BACKGROUND: Knee laxity measurements have been shown to be associated with some medical conditions such as chronic joint pain and collagen tissue diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of demographic factors and anthropometric measures on knee laxity.
    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data were collected from 521 visitors, staffs and students from the University Malaya Medical Centre and University of Malaya between December 2009 and May 2010. Knee laxity was measured using a KT-1000 arthrometer. Multiple regression analysis was used to find the association of knee laxity with age and anthropometric measures.
    RESULTS: Using ANOVA, knee laxity did not show significant differences among ethnic groups for both genders. The average knee laxity in men was 3.47 mm (right) and 3.49 mm (left); while in women were 3.90 mm (right) and 3.67 mm (left). Knee laxity in women was significantly higher (right knee p<0.01 and left knee p<0.05) than men. Right knee laxity of men was negatively associated with height (p<0.05) and BMI (p<0.05); also a negative association was observed between left knee laxity and BMI (p<0.05). Overweight and obese men had less knee laxity than normal weight and underweight individuals. Elderly men and women (age 55 and above) had lower knee laxity (p<0.01) than young adults (ages 21-39).
    CONCLUSION: These results suggest that age and body size are important factors in predicting knee laxity.
    KEYWORDS: Age; Anthropometric measures; Joint mobility; KT 1000; Knee laxity
    Matched MeSH terms: Middle Aged
  16. Zyoud TYT, Abdul Rashid SN, Suppiah S, Mahmud R, Kabeer A, Abd Manaf R, et al.
    Malays J Pathol, 2020 Dec;42(3):423-431.
    PMID: 33361724
    INTRODUCTION: Post-mortem computed tomography (PMCT) provides information that helps in the determination of the cause of death and corpse identification of disaster victims. One of the methods for corpse identification includes assessment of the body stature. There is a lack of post-mortem imaging studies that focus on the anthropometric assessment of corpses. Our aim was to identify the relationship between cadaveric spine length and autopsy length (AL) among and autopsy length (AL) among a Malaysian population and derive a regression formula for the estimation of corpse body height using PMCT.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively assessed 107 cadavers that had undergone conventional autopsy and PMCT. We made 5 measurements from the PMCT that included cervical length (CL), thoracic length (TL), lumbosacral length (LS), total column length of the spine, excluding the sacrum and coccyx (TCL), and ellipse line measurement of the whole spine, excluding the sacrum and coccyx (EL). We compared these anthropometric PMCT measurements with AL and correlated them using linear regression analysis.

    RESULTS: The results showed a significant linear relationship existed between TL and LS with AL, which was higher in comparison with the other parameters than the rest of the spine parameters. The linear regression formula derived was: 48.163 + 2.458 (TL) + 2.246 (LS).

    CONCLUSIONS: The linear regression formula derived from PMCT spine length parameters particularly thoracic and lumbar spine gave a finer correlation with autopsy body length and can be used for accurate estimation of cadaveric height. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first ever linear regression formula for cadaveric height assessment using only post mortem CT spine length measurements.

    Matched MeSH terms: Middle Aged
  17. Zyoud SH, Al-Jabi SW, Sweileh WM, Wildali AH, Saleem HM, Aysa HA, et al.
    Int J Cardiol, 2013 Oct 3;168(3):2981-3.
    PMID: 23647601 DOI: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2013.04.105
    Matched MeSH terms: Middle Aged
  18. Zyoud SH, Awang R, Sulaiman SA, Al-Jabi SW
    Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf, 2011 Feb;20(2):203-8.
    PMID: 21254292 DOI: 10.1002/pds.2060
    Acetaminophen overdose may be accompanied by electrolyte disturbances. The basis for electrolyte change appears to be due to increased fractional urinary electrolyte excretion.
    Matched MeSH terms: Middle Aged
  19. Zyoud SH, Awang R, Sulaiman SA, Al-Jabi SW
    Hum Psychopharmacol, 2010 Aug;25(6):500-8.
    PMID: 20737523 DOI: 10.1002/hup.1140
    The objectives of this study were to determine the risk factors and life stressors that are prevalent among the acetaminophen deliberate self-poisoning (DSP) cases, to identify gender differences in the associated factors, and to determine the prevalence of psychiatric diagnosis and the patterns and types of psychotherapeutic interventions provided by psychiatrists.
    Matched MeSH terms: Middle Aged
  20. Zyoud SH, Awang R, Sulaiman SA, Khan HR, Sawalha AF, Sweileh WM, et al.
    Basic Clin Pharmacol Toxicol, 2010 Sep;107(3):718-23.
    PMID: 20374238 DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-7843.2010.00567.x
    Intravenous N-acetylcysteine is usually regarded as a safe antidote. However, during the infusion of the loading dose, different types of adverse drug reactions (ADR) may occur. The objective of this study was to investigate the relation between the incidence of different types of ADR and serum acetaminophen concentration in patients presenting to the hospital with acetaminophen overdose. This is a retrospective study of patients admitted to the hospital for acute acetaminophen overdose over a period of 5 years (1 January 2004 to 31 December 2008). Parametric and non-parametric tests were used to test differences between groups depending on the normality of the data. SPSS 15 was used for data analysis. Of 305 patients with acetaminophen overdose, 146 (47.9%) were treated with intravenous N-acetylcysteine and 139 (45.6%) were included in this study. Different types of ADR were observed in 94 (67.6%) patients. Low serum acetaminophen concentrations were significantly associated with cutaneous anaphylactoid reactions but not other types of ADR. Low serum acetaminophen concentration was significantly associated with flushing (p < 0.001), rash (p < 0.001) and pruritus (p < 0.001). However, there were no significant differences in serum acetaminophen concentrations between patients with and without the following ADR: gastrointestinal reactions (p = 0.77), respiratory reactions (p = 0.96), central nervous reactions (p = 0.82) and cardiovascular reactions (p = 0.37). In conclusion, low serum acetaminophen concentrations were associated with higher cutaneous anaphylactoid reactions. Such high serum acetaminophen concentrations may be protective against N-acetylcysteine-induced cutaneous ADR.
    Matched MeSH terms: Middle Aged
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