Displaying publications 1 - 20 of 79 in total

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  1. Tekeleselassie AW, Goh YM, Rajion MA, Motshakeri M, Ebrahimi M
    ScientificWorldJournal, 2013;2013:757593.
    PMID: 24294136 DOI: 10.1155/2013/757593
    This study was aimed to investigate the effects of dietary fatty acids on the accretion pattern of major fat pads, inguinal fat cellularity, and their relation with plasma leptin concentration. Forty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned into four groups and received the following diets for 22 weeks: (1) standard rat chow diet (CTRL), (2) CTRL + 10% (w/w) butter (HFAR), (3) CTRL + 3.33% (w/w) menhaden fish oil + 6.67% (w/w) soybean oil (MFAR), and (4) CTRL + 6.67% (w/w) menhaden fish oil + 3.33% (w/w) soybean oil (LFAR). Inguinal fat cellularity and plasma leptin concentration were measured in this study. Results for inguinal fat cellularity showed that the mean adipocyte number for the MFAR (9.2 ∗ 10⁵ ± 3.6) and LFAR (8.5 ∗ 10⁵ ± 5.1) groups was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than the rest, while the mean adipocyte diameter of HFAR group was larger (P < 0.05) (46.2 ± 2.8) than the rest. The plasma leptin concentration in the HFAR group was higher (P < 0.05) (3.22 ± 0.32 ng/mL), than the other groups. The higher inguinal fat cellularity clearly indicated the ability of the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and butter supplemented diets to induce hyperplasia and hypertrophy of fat cells, respectively, which caused adipocyte remodeling due to hyperleptinemia.
    Matched MeSH terms: Fish Oils/pharmacology
  2. Shezryna S, Anisah N, Saleh I, Syamsa RA
    Trop Biomed, 2020 Jun 01;37(2):433-442.
    PMID: 33612812
    Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus serves as an important ectoparasite of livestock and a vector of several pathogens resulting in diseases, subsequently affecting the agricultural field as well as the economy. The extensive use of synthetic acaricides is known to cause resistance over time and therefore a much safer, effective and environmentally friendly alternative to overcome tick infestation should be implemented. Larval immersion tests (LIT) were done to evaluate the effects of Citrus hystrix (Family: Rutaceae) and Cymbopogon citratus (Family: Poaceae) essential oils (EOs) for their individual and combined (1:1) acaricidal activity against the cattle tick. Results showed that LC50 and LC90 values in 24 and 48 hours for Cit. hystrix EO were 11.98% and 24.84%, and 10.95% and 21.71% respectively. LC50 and LC90 values for Cym. citratus EO were 1.21% and 6.28%, and 1.05% and 6.12% respectively. The mixture of EOs from two plants in 1:1 ratio (Cit. hystrix 50%: Cym. citratus 50%) was found to exhibit antagonistic effect (synergistic factor < 1). The 24 hours and 48 hours LC50 and LC90 values for combined EOs were 1.52% and 2.84%, and 1.50% and 2.76% respectively. Individual and combined essential oils were subjected to qualitative analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to screen the chemical components present in EOs. Our results showed that the combination of Cit. hystrix and Cym. citratus at 1:1 ratio resulted in an antagonistic effect and the use of Cym. citratus alone is more toxic to R. (B.) microplus, making it a better alternative to chemical based acaricide.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Oils/pharmacology
  3. Aljaafari MN, AlAli AO, Baqais L, Alqubaisy M, AlAli M, Molouki A, et al.
    Molecules, 2021 Jan 26;26(3).
    PMID: 33530290 DOI: 10.3390/molecules26030628
    The emergence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has urged researchers to explore therapeutic alternatives, one of which includes the use of natural plant products such as essential oils (EO). In fact, EO obtained from clove, oregano, thymus, cinnamon bark, rosemary, eucalyptus, and lavender have been shown to present significant inhibitory effects on bacteria, fungi, and viruses; many studies have been done to measure EO efficacy against microorganisms. The strategy of combinatory effects via conventional and non-conventional methods revealed that the combined effects of EO-EO or EO-antibiotic exhibit enhanced efficacy. This paper aims to review the antimicrobial effects of EO, modes of EO action (membrane disruption, efflux inhibition, increase membrane permeability, and decrease in intracellular ATP), and their compounds' potential as effective agents against bacteria, fungi, and viruses. It is hoped that the integration of EO applications in this work can be used to consider EO for future clinical applications.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Oils/pharmacology
  4. Maizura M, Fazilah A, Norziah MH, Karim AA
    J Food Sci, 2007 Aug;72(6):C324-30.
    PMID: 17995673
    Edible films were prepared from a mixture of partially hydrolyzed sago starch and alginate (SA). Lemongrass oil (0.1% to 0.4%, v/w) and glycerol (0% and 20%, w/w) were incorporated in the films to act as natural antimicrobial agent and plasticizer, respectively. The films were characterized for antimicrobial activity, water vapor permeability (WVP), tensile strength (TS), percent elongation at break (%E), and water solubility (WS). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was conducted to determine functional group interactions between the matrix and lemongrass oil. The zone of inhibition was increased significantly (P < 0.05) by addition of lemongrass oil at all levels in the presence and the absence of glycerol. This indicates that the film containing lemongrass oil was effective against Escherichia coli O157:H7 at all levels. In the absence of glycerol, the tensile strength of film decreased as the oil content increased, but there was no significant (P > 0.05) difference in percent elongation. The percent elongation at break and WVP values for film with 20% glycerol was found to be increased significantly (P < 0.05) with an increase in lemongrass oil content. Addition of lemongrass oil did not have any interaction with the functional groups of films as measured by FTIR.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Oils/pharmacology*
  5. Tan YN, Ayob MK, Osman MA, Matthews KR
    Lett Appl Microbiol, 2011 Nov;53(5):509-17.
    PMID: 21848644 DOI: 10.1111/j.1472-765X.2011.03137.x
    The goal of this study was to determine inhibitory effect of palm kernel expeller (PKE) peptides of different degree of hydrolysis (DH %) against spore-forming bacteria Bacillus cereus, Bacillus circulans, Bacillus coagulans, Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus stearothermophillus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus thuringiensis, Clostridium perfringens; and non-spore-forming bacteria Escherichia coli, Lisinibacillus sphaericus, Listeria monocytogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella Typhimurium and Staphylococcus aureus.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Oils/pharmacology
  6. Mastura M, Nor Azah MA, Khozirah S, Mawardi R, Manaf AA
    Cytobios, 1999;98(387):17-23.
    PMID: 10490360
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Oils/pharmacology*
  7. Zadeh-Ardabili PM, Rad SK, Rad SK, Movafagh A
    Sci Rep, 2019 12 27;9(1):19953.
    PMID: 31882885 DOI: 10.1038/s41598-019-56360-8
    Oxidative stress has significant role in pathophysiology of any kind of depression through actions of free radicals, non-radical molecules, and unbalancing antioxidant systems in body. In the current study, antidepressant responses of fish oil (FO), Neptune krill oil (NKO), vitamin B12 (Vit B12), and also imipramine (IMP) as the reference were studied. Natural light was employed to induce stress in the animals followed by oral administration of the drugs for 14 days. The antidepressant effect was assessed by tail suspension test (TST) and forced swimming test (FST), antioxidant enzymes and oxidative stress markers were then measured in the brain tissue of the animals. The administration of FO and NKO could significantly reduce the immobility of the animals; while, increasing climbing and swimming time compared to the normal saline in CUS-control group in TST and FST, similarly to IMP but not with Vit B12. Vit B12 could not effect on SOD activity and H2O2 level, but, cause decrease of the malondialdihydric (MDA) level and CAT activity, as well as increased the GPx and GSH activities. The rest treatments led to decrease of MDA, H2O2 levels and CAT activity and increase of GPx, SOD, GSH activities.
    Matched MeSH terms: Fish Oils/pharmacology*
  8. Arbabi L, Baharuldin MT, Moklas MA, Fakurazi S, Muhammad SI
    Behav Brain Res, 2014 Sep 1;271:65-71.
    PMID: 24867329 DOI: 10.1016/j.bbr.2014.05.036
    Postpartum depression (PPD) is a psychiatric disorder that occurs in 10-15% of childbearing women. It is hypothesized that omega-3 fatty acids, which are components of fish oil, may attenuate depression symptoms. In order to examine this hypothesis, the animal model of postpartum depression was established in the present study. Ovariectomized female rats underwent hormone-simulated pregnancy (HSP) regimen and received progesterone and estradiol benzoate or vehicle for 23 days, mimicking the actual rat's pregnancy. The days after hormone termination were considered as the postpartum period. Forced feeding of menhaden fish oil, as a source of omega-3, with three doses of 1, 3, and 9g/kg/d, fluoxetine 15mg/kg/d, and distilled water 2ml/d per rat started in five postpartum-induced and one vehicle group on postpartum day 1 and continued for 15 consecutive days. On postpartum day 15, all groups were tested in the forced swimming test (FST) and open field test (OFT), followed by a biochemical assay. Results showed that the postpartum-induced rats not treated with menhaden fish oil, exhibited an increase in immobility time seen in FST, hippocampal concentration of corticosterone and plasmatic level of corticosterone, and pro-inflammatory cytokines. These depression-related effects were attenuated by supplementation of menhaden fish oil with doses of 3 and 9g/kg. Moreover, results of rats supplemented with menhaden fish oil were comparable to rats treated with the clinically effective antidepressant, fluoxetine. Taken together, these results suggest that menhaden fish oil, rich in omega-3, exerts beneficial effect on postpartum depression and decreases the biomarkers related to depression such as corticosterone and pro-inflammatory cytokines.
    Matched MeSH terms: Fish Oils/pharmacology*
  9. Kamazeri TS, Samah OA, Taher M, Susanti D, Qaralleh H
    Asian Pac J Trop Med, 2012 Mar;5(3):202-9.
    PMID: 22305785 DOI: 10.1016/S1995-7645(12)60025-X
    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the chemical composition of the essential oils of Curcuma aeruginosa (C. aeruginosa), Curcuma mangga (C. mangga), and Zingiber cassumunar (Z. cassumunar), and study their antimicrobial activity.

    METHODS: Essential oils obtained by steam distillation were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The antimicrobial activity of the essential oils was evaluated against four bacteria: Bacillus cereus (B. cereus), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Escherichia coli (E. coli), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa); and two fungi: Candida albicans (C. albicans) and Cyptococcus neoformans (C. neoformans), using disc-diffusion and broth microdilution methods.

    RESULTS: Cycloisolongifolene, 8,9-dehydro formyl (35.29%) and dihydrocostunolide (22.51%) were the major compounds in C. aeruginosa oil; whereas caryophyllene oxide (18.71%) and caryophyllene (12.69%) were the major compounds in C. mangga oil; and 2,6,9,9-tetramethyl-2,6,10-cycloundecatrien-1-one (60.77%) and α-caryophyllene (23.92%) were abundant in Z. cassumunar oil. The essential oils displayed varying degrees of antimicrobial activity against all tested microorganisms. C. mangga oil had the highest and most broad-spectrum activity by inhibiting all microorganisms tested, with C. neoformans being the most sensitive microorganism by having the lowest minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) values of 0.1 μL/mL. C. aeruginosa oil showed mild antimicrobial activity, whereas Z. cassumunar had very low or weak activity against the tested microorganisms.

    CONCLUSIONS: The preliminary results suggest promising antimicrobial properties of C. mangga and C. aeruginosa, which may be useful for food preservation, pharmaceutical treatment and natural therapies.

    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Oils/pharmacology*
  10. Emeka LB, Emeka PM, Khan TM
    Pak J Pharm Sci, 2015 Nov;28(6):1985-90.
    PMID: 26639493
    Microbial resistance to existing antibiotics has led to an increase in the use of medicinal plants that show beneficial effects for various infectious diseases. The study evaluates the susceptibility of multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus to Nigella sativa oil. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from 34 diabetic patient's wounds attending the Renaissance hospital, Nsukka, Southeast Nigeria. The isolates were characterized and identified using standard microbiological techniques. Isolates were cultured and a comparative In vitro antibiotic susceptibility test was carried out using the disk diffusion method. Of the 34 samples collected, 19(56%) showed multidrug resistance to the commonly used antibiotics. Nigella sativa oil was then studied for antibacterial activity against these multidrug resistant isolates of Staphylococcus aureus in varying concentration by well diffusion method. The oil showed pronounced dose dependent antibacterial activity against the isolates. Out of 19 isolates, 8(42%) were sensitive to undiluted oil sample; 4(21%) of these showed sensitivity at 200 mg/ml, 400 mg/ml and 800 mg/ml respectively. Eleven (58%) of the isolates were completely resistant to all the oil concentrations. The present study, reports the isolation of multi-drug resistant S. aureus from diabetic wounds and that more than half of isolates were susceptible to different concentrations N. sativa oil.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Oils/pharmacology*
  11. Khalid MH, Akhtar MN, Mohamad AS, Perimal EK, Akira A, Israf DA, et al.
    J Ethnopharmacol, 2011 Sep 1;137(1):345-51.
    PMID: 21664960 DOI: 10.1016/j.jep.2011.05.043
    Zingiber zerumbet (L.) Smith, a wild edible ginger species or locally known as "lempoyang", commonly used in the Malays traditional medicine as an appetizer or to treat stomachache, toothache, muscle sprain and as a cure for swelling sores and cuts.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Oils/pharmacology*
  12. Ibraheem ZO, Satar M, Abdullah NA, Rathore H, Tan YC, Uldin F, et al.
    Pak J Pharm Sci, 2014 Jan;27(1):1-9.
    PMID: 24374430
    Recently, it is suggested to use POLE (palm oil leaf extract) as a nutraceutical health product in food industry due to its newly discovered content of polyphenols and antioxidant vitamins. In the experiment, the antioxidant and anti-lipid-peroxidation activities of the extract were confirmed using; DPPH (1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazil) radical scavenging activity, ferric ion induced lipid peroxidation inhibition, reducing power and hydrogen peroxide scavenging activity assays. The cardio-protective activity was studied in vivo using a model of metabolic syndrome induced by high fat diet. Lipid profile, obesity indices, renal tubular handling of water and electrolytes, blood pressure and arterial stiffness were measured at the end of the treatment period. Sprague Dawley rats weighing 150-200 g were divided into six groups, viz; group C; was treated as a negative control and fed with standard rodents chow, group H; was treated as a positive control and fed with an experimental diet enriched with saturated free fatty acids for 8 weeks, groups HP0.5, HP1 and HP2 which were fed with 0.5,1 and 2 g/kg (body weight) /day of POLE orally during the last 24 days of the high fat diet feeding period and group P; fed with highest dose of POLE. Results revealed that POLE possesses a cardio-protective effect which is ascribed to its content of polyphenols.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Oils/pharmacology*
  13. Marina AM, Man YB, Nazimah SA, Amin I
    Int J Food Sci Nutr, 2009;60 Suppl 2:114-23.
    PMID: 19115123 DOI: 10.1080/09637480802549127
    The antioxidant properties of virgin coconut oil produced through chilling and fermentation were investigated and compared with refined, bleached and deodorized coconut oil. Virgin coconut oil showed better antioxidant capacity than refined, bleached and deodorized coconut oil. The virgin coconut oil produced through the fermentation method had the strongest scavenging effect on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and the highest antioxidant activity based on the beta-carotene-linoleate bleaching method. However, virgin coconut oil obtained through the chilling method had the highest reducing power. The major phenolic acids detected were ferulic acid and p-coumaric acid. Very high correlations were found between the total phenolic content and scavenging activity (r=0.91), and between the total phenolic content and reducing power (r=0.96). There was also a high correlation between total phenolic acids and beta-carotene bleaching activity. The study indicated that the contribution of antioxidant capacity in virgin coconut oil could be due to phenolic compounds.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Oils/pharmacology*
  14. Ali A, Wee Pheng T, Mustafa MA
    J Appl Microbiol, 2015 Jun;118(6):1456-64.
    PMID: 25727701 DOI: 10.1111/jam.12782
    To evaluate the potential use of lemongrass essential oil vapour as an alternative for synthetic fungicides in controlling anthracnose of papaya.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Oils/pharmacology*
  15. Jamal P, Alam MZ, Suhani F
    Med J Malaysia, 2008 Jul;63 Suppl A:107-8.
    PMID: 19025008
    Large quantities of agro-based liquid wastes are produced every year and their disposal is often a problem for industries. In light of that, in this study prudent effort was done to screen the agro-industrial wastes - pineapple waste (PAW) and palm oil mill effluent (POME) for valuable biophenols product. Three different solvents; ethanol, acetone and distilled water were screened in order to enhance the process. All experiments were performed using fixed process conditions of solid to solvent ratio, temperatures, time and agitation speed. Effectiveness of extraction process to produce biophenol was based on high amount with more activity. POME was selected as potential source with biophenol content of 125.42 mg/L GAE.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Oils/pharmacology*
  16. Yakubu A, Azlan A, Loh SP, Md Noor S
    J Obes, 2019;2019:4929131.
    PMID: 31354987 DOI: 10.1155/2019/4929131
    This review article stresses the effective role of dietary fish fillet docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) on overweight as a risk factor of cardiovascular disease (CVD) via platelet phospholipid modification. Several reports have demonstrated that saturated fat in overweight evokes systemic inflammation and more importantly predisposes it to cardiovascular disorder. Prospective studies have shown that saturated fat is directly proportional to the level of arachidonic acids (AA), precursor of thromboxane in the platelet phospholipid membrane as omega-6 fatty acid in overweight and obese people. Some literature has demonstrated that omega-3 fatty acid from fish fillet ameliorates inflammation, reduces proinflammatory cytokine, inhibits signaling pathway, and regulates the physical composition of inflammatory leukocytes and free radicals (ROS). Yellow stripe scad (YSS) is a local Malaysian fish that has been shown to contain a comparable level of EPA/DHA content as observed in salmon. This review article will focus on the dietary role of fish fillet that will balance the omega-6 fatty acid/omega-3 fatty acid ratio in platelet phospholipid from YSS to manage and prevent healthy overweight/obesity-related risk factor of CVD and to avoid the risk orthodox drug treatment.
    Matched MeSH terms: Fish Oils/pharmacology*
  17. Yusoff MM, Ibrahim H, Hamid NA
    Chem. Biodivers., 2011 May;8(5):916-23.
    PMID: 21560240 DOI: 10.1002/cbdv.201000270
    Two poorly studied, morphologically allied Alpinia species endemic to Borneo, viz., A. ligulata and A. nieuwenhuizii, were investigated here for their rhizome essential oil. The oil compositions and antimicrobial activities were compared with those of A. galanga, a better known plant. A fair number of compounds were identified in the oils by GC-FID and GC/MS analyses, with large differences in the oil composition between the three species. The rhizome oil of A. galanga was rich in 1,8-cineole (29.8%), while those of A. ligulata and A. nieuwenhuizii were both found to be extremely rich in (E)-methyl cinnamate (36.4 and 67.8%, resp.). The three oils were screened for their antimicrobial activity against three Gram-positive and three Gram-negative bacteria and two fungal species. The efficiency of growth inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus var. aureus was found to decline in the order of A. nieuwenhuizii>A. ligulata ∼ A. galanga, while that of Escherichia coli decreased in the order of A. galanga>A. nieuwenhuzii ∼ A. ligulata. Only the A. galanga oil inhibited the other bacteria and the fungi tested.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Oils/pharmacology
  18. Sambanthamurthi R, Sundram K, Tan Y
    Prog. Lipid Res., 2000 Nov;39(6):507-58.
    PMID: 11106812
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Oils/pharmacology
  19. Gopalan Y, Shuaib IL, Magosso E, Ansari MA, Abu Bakar MR, Wong JW, et al.
    Stroke, 2014 May;45(5):1422-8.
    PMID: 24699052 DOI: 10.1161/STROKEAHA.113.004449
    Previous cell-based and animal studies showed mixed tocotrienols are neuroprotective, but the effect is yet to be proven in humans. Thus, the present study aimed to evaluate the protective activity of mixed tocotrienols in humans with white matter lesions (WMLs). WMLs are regarded as manifestations of cerebral small vessel disease, reflecting varying degrees of neurodegeneration and tissue damage with potential as a surrogate end point in clinical trials.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Oils/pharmacology
  20. Yap PS, Lim SH, Hu CP, Yiap BC
    Phytomedicine, 2013 Jun 15;20(8-9):710-3.
    PMID: 23537749 DOI: 10.1016/j.phymed.2013.02.013
    In this study we investigated the relationship between several selected commercially available essential oils and beta-lactam antibiotics on their antibacterial effect against multidrug resistant bacteria. The antibacterial activity of essential oils and antibiotics was assessed using broth microdilution. The combined effects between essential oils of cinnamon bark, lavender, marjoram, tea tree, peppermint and ampicillin, piperacillin, cefazolin, cefuroxime, carbenicillin, ceftazidime, meropenem, were evaluated by means of the checkerboard method against beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli. In the latter assays, fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) values were calculated to characterize interaction between the combinations. Substantial susceptibility of the bacteria toward natural antibiotics and a considerable reduction in the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of the antibiotics were noted in some paired combinations of antibiotics and essential oils. Out of 35 antibiotic-essential oil pairs tested, four of them showed synergistic effect (FIC≤0.5) and 31 pairs showed no interaction (FIC>0.5-4.0). The preliminary results obtained highlighted the occurrence of a pronounced synergistic relationship between piperacillin/cinnamon bark oil, piperacillin/lavender oil, piperacillin/peppermint oil as well as meropenem/peppermint oil against two of the three bacteria under study with a FIC index in the range 0.26-0.5. The finding highlighted the potential of peppermint, cinnamon bark and lavender essential oils being as antibiotic resistance modifying agent. Reduced usage of antibiotics could be employed as a treatment strategy to decrease the adverse effects and possibly to reverse the beta-lactam antibiotic resistance.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Oils/pharmacology*
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