Displaying publications 1 - 20 of 98 in total

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  1. Doshi HH
    Family Physician, 2003;11:9-11.
    In the light of present HIV worldwide epidemic. there is a need to teach the busy general practitioners how to recognise HIV & AIDS. Due to the deadly nature of this infection and its manifold presentations from opportunistic diseases. the busy general practitioners in primary care may be misled in making the correct diagnosis. In Malaysia. the doctors in the primary care level constitute 70 to 75% of the doctors' population. The rest are specialists in secondary and tertiary care institutions. Family Physicians from the Font liners to recognise and detect early cases of HlV in all its early manifestalions on the various systems. Any doctors in primary medicine whether from private or public sector, amy be confronted by patients who present with trivial complaints. These patients may be fee-paying, or particularly those doctors involved with welfare and health of factory workers and the other forms of the main work force should well arm themselves with updates in HIV and AIDS.
    Matched MeSH terms: Physicians, Family
  2. Ng CJ, Haidi NS
    Asia Pac Fam Med, 2005;4(3).
    Aim: To explore the help-seeking behavior of primary care doctors during illness. Methods: This qualitative study used focus group discussions to explore participants' help-seeking behavior during illness. It involved 22 primary care doctors (5 lecturers, 12 postgraduate trainees, 5 medical officers) working in a hospital-based primary care clinic. Result: Most primary care doctors in this study managed their illnesses without seeking help. Although most preferred to seek professional help for chronic illnesses and antenatal care, they tend to delay the consultations and were less likely to comply with treatment and follow-up. Explanations for their behavior include their ability to assess and treat themselves, difficulty to find suitable doctors, work commitment, easy access to drugs, and reluctance to assume a sick role. Conclusions: This study found that the help-seeking behavior of primary care doctors was similar to those in other studies. Due to their professional ability, heavy workload and expectations from peer and patients, primary care doctors were more likely to delay in seeking treatment especially for chronic and serious diseases. This highlights the need to enhance support services for doctors during illness. Key words: doctors, help-seeking behavior, illness
    Matched MeSH terms: Physicians, Family
  3. Lee YK, Ng CJ, Lee PY, Khoo EM, Abdullah KL, Low WY, et al.
    PMID: 23378747 DOI: 10.2147/PPA.S36791
    BACKGROUND: Patients with type 2 diabetes often require insulin as the disease progresses. However, health care professionals frequently encounter challenges when managing patients who require insulin therapy. Understanding how health care professionals perceive the barriers faced by patients on insulin will facilitate care and treatment strategies.
    OBJECTIVE: This study explores the views of Malaysian health care professionals on the barriers faced by patients using insulin.
    METHODS: Semi-structured qualitative interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with health care professionals involved in diabetes care using insulin. Forty-one health care professionals participated in the study, consisting of primary care doctors (n = 20), family medicine specialists (n = 10), government policymakers (n = 5), diabetes educators (n = 3), endocrinologists (n = 2), and one pharmacist. We used a topic guide to facilitate the interviews, which were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using a thematic approach.
    RESULTS: FIVE THEMES WERE IDENTIFIED AS BARRIERS: side effects, patient education, negative perceptions, blood glucose monitoring, and patient adherence to treatment and follow-up. Patients perceive that insulin therapy causes numerous negative side effects. There is a lack of patient education on proper glucose monitoring and how to optimize insulin therapy. Cost of treatment and patient ignorance are highlighted when discussing patient self-monitoring of blood glucose. Finally, health care professionals identified a lack of a follow-up system, especially for patients who do not keep to regular appointments.
    CONCLUSION: This study identifies five substantial barriers to optimizing insulin therapy. Health care professionals who successfully identify and address these issues will empower patients to achieve effective self-management. System barriers require government agency in establishing insulin follow-up programs, multidisciplinary diabetes care teams, and subsidies for glucometers and test strips.
    KEYWORDS: diabetes; focus groups; insulin; noncommunicable disease; primary care; qualitative study
    Matched MeSH terms: Physicians, Family
  4. Jayasinghe S
    Malays Fam Physician, 2008;3(1):34-6.
    PMID: 25606110
    The paper discusses the management of two individuals with asymptomatic hypertriglyceredemia, a common problem faces by Family Physicians in Malaysia. In such instances it is advisable to exclude an underlying disorder (e.g. metabolic syndrome) and take a pragmatic approach.
    Matched MeSH terms: Physicians, Family
  5. Rampal KG
    Family Physician, 1991;3:17-18.
    Matched MeSH terms: Physicians, Family
  6. Tan FEH
    Family Practitioner, 1975;2(1):32-34.
    Matched MeSH terms: Physicians, Family
  7. Ng CJ, Low WY, Tan NC, Choo WY
    Int. J. Impot. Res., 2004 Feb;16(1):60-3.
    PMID: 14963472 DOI: 10.1038/sj.ijir.3901141
    The objective of this study was to explore the roles and perceptions of general practitioners (GPs) in the management of erectile dysfunction (ED). This qualitative study used focus group discussions and in-depth interviews. This study was conducted based on 28 GPs from an urban area in Malaysia who had managed patients with ED and prescribed anti-ED drugs. Main outcome measures included the roles of GPs in managing patients with ED (active or passive), perceptions regarding ED and the treatment, and factors influencing their decision to prescribe. Majority of the GPs assumed a passive role when managing patients with ED. This was partly due to their perception of the disease being nonserious. Some also perceived ED as mainly psychological in nature. The anti-ED drugs were often viewed as a lifestyle drug with potentially serious side effects. The fear of being perceived by patients as 'pushing' for the drug and being blamed if the patients were to develop serious side effects also hampered the management of this disease. GPs who participated in this study remained passive in identifying and treating patients with ED and this was attributed to their perception of the disease, drug treatment and patient's background.
    Matched MeSH terms: Physicians, Family/psychology*
  8. Lim KH
    Family Physician, 2001;11:35-36.
    Despite time, mobility, knowledge and other constraints, it is still possible for General Practitioners to play an active role in Palliative Care. This article offers various roles where GP can play. Differences between hospice, palliative medicine, palliative care are discussed. Suggestions are made on where to seek formal or informal education on palliative care. Key Words: role, hospice, palliative medicine, palliative care, illness, sickness
    Matched MeSH terms: Physicians, Family
  9. Khoo SB
    Asia Pac Fam Med, 2004;4(1):1-3.
    Patients who are entering the last phase of their illness and for whom life expectancy is short, have health needs that require particular expertise and multidisciplinary care. A combination of a rapidly changing clinical situation and considerable psychosocial and spiritual demands pose challenges that can only be met with competence, commitment and human compassion. This article is concerned with the definition of suffering, recognition of the terminal phase and application of the biopsychosocial-spiritual model of care where family physicians play an important role in the community. Key words: biopsychosocial-spiritual care, dying, family medicine, good death, palliative care, suffering.
    Matched MeSH terms: Physicians, Family
  10. Lee BS
    Family Practitioner, 1975;2(1):27-29.
    Matched MeSH terms: Physicians, Family
  11. Catterall RA
    Family Practitioner, 1976;2:13-17.
    Matched MeSH terms: Physicians, Family
  12. Koh EK
    Family Practitioner, 1977;2:69-71.
    Matched MeSH terms: Physicians, Family
  13. Tan FEH
    Family Practitioner, 1977;2(8):49-51.
    Matched MeSH terms: Physicians, Family
  14. Rajakumar MK
    Citation: Rajakumar MK. The family physician in Asia: looking to the 21st century. Family Medicine Education in the Asia-Pacific Region. Core Curriculum for Residency/Vocational Training and Core Content for Specialty Qualifying Examination. The Philippine Academy of Family Medicine, 1993. [Originally published in the Filipino Family Physician in 1993]

    Republished in:
    1. Republished in: Teng CL, Khoo EM, Ng CJ (editors). Family Medicine, Healthcare and Society: Essays by Dr M K Rajakumar, Second Edition. Kuala Lumpur: Academy of Family Physicians of Malaysia, 2019: 40-45
    2. An Uncommon Hero. p354-360
    Matched MeSH terms: Physicians, Family
  15. McKay AB
    Family Practitioner, 1977;2(8):101-105.
    Matched MeSH terms: Physicians, Family
  16. Abdul Aziz AF, Tan CE, Ali MF, Aljunid SM
    Health Qual Life Outcomes, 2020 Jun 20;18(1):193.
    PMID: 32563246 DOI: 10.1186/s12955-020-01450-9
    BACKGROUND: Satisfaction with post stroke services would assist stakeholders in addressing gaps in service delivery. Tools used to evaluate satisfaction with stroke care services need to be validated to match healthcare services provided in each country. Studies on satisfaction with post discharge stroke care delivery in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) are scarce, despite knowledge that post stroke care delivery is fragmented and poorly coordinated. This study aims to modify and validate the HomeSat subscale of the Dutch Satisfaction with Stroke Care-19 (SASC-19) questionnaire for use in Malaysia and in countries with similar public healthcare services in the region.

    METHODS: The HomeSat subscale of the Dutch SASC-19 questionnaire (11 items) underwent back-to-back translation to produce a Malay language version. Content validation was done by Family Medicine Specialists involved in community post-stroke care. Community social support services in the original questionnaire were substituted with equivalent local services to ensure contextual relevance. Internal consistency reliability was determined using Cronbach alpha. Exploratory factor analysis was done to validate the factor structure of the Malay version of the questionnaire (SASC10-My™). The SASC10-My™ was then tested on 175 post-stroke patients who were recruited at ten public primary care healthcentres across Peninsular Malaysia, in a trial-within a trial study.

    RESULTS: One item from the original Dutch SASC19 (HomeSat) was dropped. Internal consistency for remaining 10 items was high (Cronbach alpha 0.830). Exploratory factor analysis showed the SASC10-My™ had 2 factors: discharge transition and social support services after discharge. The mean total score for SASC10-My™ was 10.74 (SD 7.33). Overall, only 18.2% were satisfied with outpatient stroke care services (SASC10-My™ score ≥ 20). Detailed analysis revealed only 10.9% of respondents were satisfied with discharge transition services, while only 40.9% were satisfied with support services after discharge.

    CONCLUSIONS: The SASC10-My™ questionnaire is a reliable and valid tool to measure caregiver or patient satisfaction with outpatient stroke care services in the Malaysian healthcare setting. Studies linking discharge protocol patterns and satisfaction with outpatient stroke care services should be conducted to improve care delivery and longer-term outcomes.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: No.: ACTRN12616001322426 (Registration Date: 21st September 2016.

    Matched MeSH terms: Physicians, Family
  17. Harris N P
    Malays Fam Physician, 2009;4(1):6-7.
    Note by TCL: The Rajakumar Movement is the Wonca Asia Pacific Region Working Party for Young and Future Family Doctors. It was named in honour of Dr M K Rajakumar.
    Matched MeSH terms: Physicians, Family
  18. Dowrick C, Kassai R, Lam CLK, Lam RW, Manning G, Murphy J, et al.
    J Multidiscip Healthc, 2020;13:1693-1704.
    PMID: 33268991 DOI: 10.2147/JMDH.S271070
    Mental ill health affects individual well-being and national economic prosperity and makes up a substantial portion of the burden of disease globally, especially in the Asia-Pacific region. Integrating mental health into primary care is widely considered a key strategy to improve access to mental health care. Integration, however, is a complex process that needs to be addressed at multiple levels. A collaboration between the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Digital Hub for Mental Health and the World Organization of Family Doctors (WONCA) is described in this paper, which outlines a framework and next steps to improve the mental health of communities in APEC economies. This paper notes gaps related to the integration of mental health into primary care across the region and identifies enablers and current best practices from several APEC economies. The potential of digital technology to benefit primary mental health care for populations in the APEC region, including delivery of training programs for healthcare staff and access to resources for patients, is described. Finally, key next steps are proposed to promote enhanced integration into primary care and improve mental health care throughout the APEC region.
    Matched MeSH terms: Physicians, Family
  19. Omar M, Abdul Rahman AA, Mohd Hussein AM, Mustafa N
    Family Physician, 2005;13(3):15-15.
    MyJurnal
    Osteopoikilosis is a rare bone dysplasia which is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with a prevalence of less than 0.1 per million.1 It is characterised by dense ovoid or circular spots in cancellous bone which may appear at birth or during skeletal growth. It is usually found in the metaphyseal and epiphyseal regions of long bones, the carpals and tarsals, the end of large turbular bones and around the acetabula. It is clinically asymptomatic and occasionally associated with hereditary multiple exostosis and dermatofibrosis lenticularis disseminata. It is not associated with spontaneous fractures and treatment is unnecessary. However a case of osteosarcoma developing in a man with osteopoikilosis has been reported. The first case of osteopoikilosis was reported in Malaysia four years ago in a 25 years old lady who is also of Indian descent. It would be interesting to know if these two patients are related. Since the bone lesions could easily be mistaken for metastatic disease, it is important that family physicians be aware of the benign nature of this condition.
    Matched MeSH terms: Physicians, Family
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