Displaying publications 1 - 20 of 102 in total

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  1. Jones JJ, Watkins PJ, Owyong LY, Loh PP, Kutty MK, Jogie B
    Trop Geogr Med, 1978 Dec;30(4):439-49.
    PMID: 749278
    One hundred and thirty-two newly diagnosed Asian diabetic patients (39 Malay, 30 Chinese and 63 Indians) have been studied in Kuala Lumpur. The highest proportion of diabetic patients were Indian and the lowest were Chinese. Vascular complications were equally common in Asian diabetic patients as in Europeans; coronary heart disease was relatively more common in Indians and cerebral vascular disease in Chinese. Twenty percent of all Asian diabetic patients requiring admission to hospital also had coronary heart disease, 9% had cerebral vascular disease and 8% had gangrene or ulceration of the feet. In Kuala Lumpur, diabetes is a very important risk factor for coronary heart disease: 17% of all patients admitted to the General Hospital with coronary heart disease were already diabetic.
    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood
  2. Eshkoor SA, Hamid TA, Shahar S, Mun CY
    J Nutr Health Aging, 2017;21(2):220-226.
    PMID: 28112780 DOI: 10.1007/s12603-016-0779-x
    BACKGROUND: Urinary incontinence is a prevalent condition in the elderly that is the spontaneous leakage of urine. It is an age-related problem and increases especially in people aged above 65 years. It can cause many psychological, behavioral, biological, economic and social effects. The treatment of urinary incontinence can reduce morbidity and mortality. Thus, this study aimed to determine the effects of variables including age, ethnicity, gender, education, marital status, body weight, blood elements and nutritional parameters on urinary incontinence among the Malaysian elderly.

    METHODS: The study was on 2322 non-institutionalized Malaysian elderly. The hierarchy logistic regression analysis was applied to estimate the risk of independent variables for urinary incontinence among respondents.

    RESULTS: The findings indicated that approximately 3.80% of subjects had urinary incontinence. In addition, constipation was found a significant factor that increased the risk of urinary incontinence in samples (p=0.006; OR=3.77). The increase in dietary monounsaturated fat (p=0.038; OR=0.59) and plasma triglyceride levels (p=0.029; OR=0.56) significantly reduced the risk of incontinence in subjects. Many of suspected variables including socio-demographic factors, diseases, nutritional minerals, blood components and body weight were non-relevant factors to urinary incontinence in respondents.

    CONCLUSIONS: Constipation increased the risk of urinary incontinence in subjects, and increase in dietary monounsaturated fat and plasma triglyceride levels decreased the risk.

    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood
  3. Nang EE, Salim A, Wu Y, Tai ES, Lee J, Van Dam RM
    PMID: 23718927 DOI: 10.1186/1479-5868-10-70
    BACKGROUND: Recent evidence shows that sedentary behaviour may be an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, cancers and all-cause mortality. However, results are not consistent and different types of sedentary behaviour might have different effects on health. Thus the aim of this study was to evaluate the association between television screen time, computer/reading time and cardio-metabolic biomarkers in a multiethnic urban Asian population. We also sought to understand the potential mediators of this association.
    METHODS: The Singapore Prospective Study Program (2004-2007), was a cross-sectional population-based study in a multiethnic population in Singapore. We studied 3305 Singaporean adults of Chinese, Malay and Indian ethnicity who did not have pre-existing diseases and conditions that could affect their physical activity. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to assess the association of television screen time and computer/reading time with cardio-metabolic biomarkers [blood pressure, lipids, glucose, adiponectin, C reactive protein and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)]. Path analysis was used to examine the role of mediators of the observed association.
    RESULTS: Longer television screen time was significantly associated with higher systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, triglycerides, C reactive protein, HOMA-IR, and lower adiponectin after adjustment for potential socio-demographic and lifestyle confounders. Dietary factors and body mass index, but not physical activity, were potential mediators that explained most of these associations between television screen time and cardio-metabolic biomarkers. The associations of television screen time with triglycerides and HOMA-IR were only partly explained by dietary factors and body mass index. No association was observed between computer/ reading time and worse levels of cardio-metabolic biomarkers.
    CONCLUSIONS: In this urban Asian population, television screen time was associated with worse levels of various cardio-metabolic risk factors. This may reflect detrimental effects of television screen time on dietary habits rather than replacement of physical activity.
    MESH: screen time
    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood
  4. Hadaegh F, Harati H, Zabetian A, Azizi F
    Med J Malaysia, 2006 Aug;61(3):332-8.
    PMID: 17240585
    There are contradictory results regarding the pattern of seasonal variation of serum lipids. The aim of this study was to compare serum lipid levels in different seasons in participants of the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study. This was a cross-sectional study among 2890 men and 4004 women 20-64 years old from the participants of Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study (TLGS) between 1999 and 2001. Mean values of serum lipids in different seasons were compared with Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA) after adjustment for age, physical activity level, smoking, BMI and Waist-to-hip ratio. In men, there was a significant trend for change in the values of cholesterol, LDL-C and HDL-C in different seasons, with higher cholesterol and LDL-C values in winter than in summer (P < 0.05). In women, only the mean values of triglycerides were significantly different between different seasons with values lower in winter than in summer. There was a 26.2% relative increase in the prevalence of hypercholesterolemia (> or = 240 mg/dl) in winter than in summer in men. The corresponding increase in the prevalence of high LDL-C (> or = 160 mg/dl) was 26.7% and 24.9% in men and women, respectively (P < 0.05). The prevalence of high triglycerides (> or = _ 200mg/dl) in women significantly decreased (23.8%) in winter relative to summer (P < 0.001). This study showed that there is seasonal variability in serum lipid values and this variability is greater in men than women. The increase in the prevalence of high LDL in winter in both sexes must be considered in population screening and in the follow-up of hyperlipidemic patients.
    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood
  5. Ng TK
    Med J Malaysia, 1993 Mar;48(1):12-6.
    PMID: 8341167
    Postprandial changes in plasma total cholesterol (TC) are minimal and there is essentially no difference between fasting vs random TC concentrations, as reflected in the small diurnal coefficient of variation (CV) for TC of 2.5%. Similarly, a cholesterol-rich meal within the last 24 hours lacked an impact on plasma TC. Thus, random specimens are acceptable in blood cholesterol screening. The intraindividual biological CV (CVb) for plasma TC as measured over a long period was estimated from the data of several published studies to be 6.0%, which, when combined with a probable analytical CV (CVa) of 5% during screening, gave a total intraindividual CV (CVt) of about 8% for the single cholesterol assay. There is consensus that 'high TC values' acquired during screening should be confirmed under the conventional laboratory setting capable of CVa of 3% or less.
    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood
  6. Tariq AR, Maheendran K, Kamsiah J, Christina P
    Med J Malaysia, 1992 Sep;47(3):182-9.
    PMID: 1491643
    Twenty eight patients who satisfied the entry criteria and had completed an initial 2 weeks treatment with placebo were titrated fortnightly with doses of Nicardipine ranging from 30 mg to 90 mg daily in two or three divided doses. Nicardipine treatment significantly reduced blood pressures both in the supine and standing positions (p < 0.0004) when compared with placebo treatment. Heart rates however did not change significantly. Forty six percent (13/28) of patients on 20 mg twice daily, 25% (7/28) on 10 mg three times daily, 18% (5/28) of patients on 20 mg three times daily and 11% (3/28) on 30 mg three times daily achieved supine diastolic blood pressures < 90 mm Hg. Nicardipine treatment at 16 weeks and at 24 weeks did not significantly alter the lipid profile when compared to the end of placebo treatment period. No other biochemical abnormalities were reported during the study period. Except for 2 cases of mild pedal oedema and 2 cases of transient headaches, no serious side-effects were encountered.
    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood
  7. Ng TK, Chong YH
    Med J Malaysia, 1975 Mar;30(3):169-74.
    PMID: 169458
    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood
  8. Wilhelmsen L
    Med J Malaysia, 1977 Jun;31(4):296-301.
    PMID: 927236
    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood
  9. Al-Khateeb A, Mohamed MS, Imran K, Ibrahim S, Zilfalil BA, Yusof Z
    Kobe J Med Sci, 2011;57(2):E38-48.
    PMID: 22926072
    The importance of serum lipids as cardiovascular risk factors is well recognized. However, most published studies have focused on western countries. The present study aimed to describe and analyze the lipid profile parameters in Malaysian dyslipidemic patients, and to identify concomitant clinical problems and risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) among such patients.
    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood
  10. Tai ES, Corella D, Deurenberg-Yap M, Cutter J, Chew SK, Tan CE, et al.
    J Nutr, 2003 Nov;133(11):3399-408.
    PMID: 14608050
    We have previously reported an interaction between -514C>T polymorphism at the hepatic lipase (HL) gene and dietary fat on high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) metabolism in a representative sample of white subjects participating in the Framingham Heart Study. Replication of these findings in other populations will provide proof for the relevance and consistency of this marker as a tool for risk assessment and more personalized cardiovascular disease prevention. Therefore, we examined this gene-nutrient interaction in a representative sample of Singaporeans (1324 Chinese, 471 Malays and 375 Asian Indians) whose dietary fat intake was recorded by a validated questionnaire. When no stratification by fat intake was considered, the T allele was associated with higher plasma HDL-C concentrations (P = 0.001), higher triglyceride (TG) concentrations (P = 0.001) and higher HDL-C/TG ratios (P = 0.041). We found a highly significant interaction (P = 0.001) between polymorphism and fat intake in determining TG concentration and the HDL-C/TG ratio (P = 0.001) in the overall sample even after adjustment for potential confounders. Thus, TT subjects showed higher TG concentrations only when fat intake supplied >30% of total energy. This interaction was also found when fat intake was considered as continuous (P = 0.035). Moreover, in the upper tertile of fat intake, TT subjects had 45% more TG than CC individuals (P < 0.01). For HDL-C concentration, the gene-diet interaction was significant (P = 0.015) only in subjects of Indian origin. In conclusion, our results indicate that there are differences in the association of -514C>T polymorphism with plasma lipids according to dietary intake and ethnic background. Specifically, the TT genotype is associated with a more atherogenic lipid profile when subjects consume diets with a fat content > 30%.
    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood
  11. Whitton C, Rebello SA, Lee J, Tai ES, van Dam RM
    J Nutr, 2018 04 01;148(4):616-623.
    PMID: 29659965 DOI: 10.1093/jn/nxy016
    Background: Healthful dietary patterns are associated with cardiovascular disease risk factors in Western populations. However, a consistent healthful dietary pattern across major Asian ethnic groups has yet to be identified.

    Objective: We aimed to identify a posteriori dietary patterns for Chinese, Malay, and Indian ethnic groups in an urban Asian setting, compare these with a priori dietary patterns, and ascertain associations with cardiovascular disease risk factors including hypertension, obesity, and abnormal blood lipid concentrations.

    Methods: We used cross-sectional data from 8433 Singapore residents (aged 21-94 y) from the Multi-Ethnic Cohort study of Chinese, Malay, and Indian ethnicity. Food consumption was assessed using a validated 169-item food-frequency questionnaire. With the use of 28 food groups, dietary patterns were derived by principal component analysis, and their association with cardiovascular disease risk factors was assessed using multiple linear regression. Associations between derived patterns and a priori patterns (aHEI-2010-Alternative Healthy Eating Index-2010, aMED-alternate Mediterranean Diet, and DASH-Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) were assessed, and the magnitude of associations with risk factors compared.

    Results: We identified a "healthy" dietary pattern, similar across ethnic groups, and characterized by high intakes of whole grains, fruit, dairy, vegetables, and unsaturated cooking oil and low intakes of Western fast foods, sugar-sweetened beverages, poultry, processed meat, and flavored rice. This "healthy" pattern was inversely associated with body mass index (BMI; in kg/m2) (-0.26 per 1 SD of the pattern score; 95% CI: -0.36, -0.16), waist circumference (-0.57 cm; 95% CI: -0.82, -0.32), total cholesterol (-0.070 mmol/L; 95% CI: -0.091, -0.048), LDL cholesterol (-0.054 mmol/L; 95% CI: -0.074, -0.035), and fasting triglycerides (-0.22 mmol/L; 95% CI: -0.04, -0.004) and directly associated with HDL cholesterol (0.013 mmol/L; 95% CI: 0.006, 0.021). Generally, "healthy" pattern associations were at least as strong as a priori pattern associations with cardiovascular disease risk factors.

    Conclusion: A healthful dietary pattern that correlated well with a priori patterns and was associated with lower BMI, serum LDL cholesterol, total cholesterol, and fasting triglyceride concentrations was identified across 3 major Asian ethnic groups.

    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood
  12. Kung AW, Chao HT, Huang KE, Need AG, Taechakraichana N, Loh FH, et al.
    J Clin Endocrinol Metab, 2003 Jul;88(7):3130-6.
    PMID: 12843154
    In healthy Caucasian postmenopausal women, raloxifene increases bone mineral density (BMD), decreases biochemical markers of bone turnover, and lowers low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, without effects on high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and triglycerides. This randomized, double-blind study examines the effects of raloxifene 60 mg/d (n = 483) or placebo (n = 485) in healthy postmenopausal Asian women (mean age 57 yr) from Australia, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, and Thailand. Serum osteocalcin, serum N-telopeptide, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides were assessed at baseline and 6 months. Lumbar spine BMD was measured at baseline and 1 yr in 309 women from 4 countries. Clinical adverse events were recorded at each interim visit. At 6 months, raloxifene 60 mg/d significantly decreased osteocalcin, N-telopeptide, total cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol by medians of 15.9%, 14.6%, 5.3%, and 7.7%, respectively, from placebo. Changes in HDL cholesterol and triglycerides were similar between raloxifene and placebo. Raloxifene 60 mg/d increased mean lumbar spine BMD (1.9%) from placebo at 1 yr (P = 0.0003). The incidences of hot flashes (placebo 3.5%, raloxifene 5.6%, P = 0.12), and leg cramps (placebo 2.7%, raloxifene 4.3%, P = 0.16) were not different between groups. No case of venous thromboembolism was reported. The effects of raloxifene 60 mg/d on bone turnover, BMD, and serum lipids in healthy postmenopausal Asian women were similar to that previously reported in Caucasian women.
    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood
  13. Fairus S, Nor RM, Cheng HM, Sundram K
    Am J Clin Nutr, 2006 Oct;84(4):835-42.
    PMID: 17023711
    BACKGROUND: The detection of tocotrienols in human plasma has proven elusive, and it is hypothesized that they are rapidly assimilated and redistributed in various mammalian tissues.

    OBJECTIVE: The primary study objective was to evaluate the postprandial fate of tocotrienols and alpha-tocopherol in human plasma and lipoproteins.

    DESIGN: Seven healthy volunteers (4 males, 3 females) were administered a single dose of vitamin E [1011 mg palm tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) or 1074 mg alpha-tocopherol] after a 7-d conditioning period with a tocotrienol-free diet. Blood was sampled at baseline (fasted) and 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, and 24 h after supplementation. Concentrations of tocopherol and tocotrienol isomers in plasma, triacylglycerol-rich particles (TRPs), LDLs, and HDLs were measured at each interval.

    RESULTS: After intervention with TRF, plasma tocotrienols peaked at 4 h (4.79 +/- 1.2 microg/mL), whereas alpha-tocopherol peaked at 6 h (13.46 +/- 1.68 microg/mL). Although tocotrienols were similarly detected in TRPs, LDLs, and HDLs, tocotrienol concentrations were significantly lower than alpha-tocopherol concentrations. In comparison, plasma alpha-tocopherol peaked at 8 h (24.3 +/- 5.22 microg/mL) during the alpha-tocopherol treatment and emerged as the major vitamin E isomer detected in plasma and lipoproteins during both the TRF and the alpha-tocopherol treatments.

    CONCLUSIONS: Tocotrienols are detected in postprandial plasma, albeit in significantly lower concentrations than is alpha-tocopherol. This finding confirms previous observations that, in the fasted state, tocotrienols are not detected in plasma. Tocotrienol transport in lipoproteins appears to follow complex biochemically mediated pathways within the lipoprotein cascade.

    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood
  14. Sundram K, Hayes KC, Siru OH
    Am J Clin Nutr, 1994 Apr;59(4):841-6.
    PMID: 8147328
    In a double-blind crossover study, 17 normocholesterolemic male volunteers were fed carefully designed whole-food diets in which 5% of energy was exchanged between palmitic (16:0) and lauric + myristic acids (12:0 + 14:0) whereas all other fatty acids were held constant. Resident males received each diet during separate 4-wk periods. The test diets supplied approximately 30% of energy as fat and 200 mg cholesterol/d. Compared with the 12:0 + 14:0-rich diet, the 16:0-rich diet produced a 9% lower serum cholesterol concentration, reflected primarily by a lower (11%) low-density-lipoprotein-cholesterol concentration and, to a lesser extent, high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol. No diet-induced changes were noted in the cholesterol content of other lipoproteins, nor did exchange of saturated fatty acids affect the triglyceride concentration in serum or lipoprotein fractions. These data indicate that a dietary 12:0 + 14:0 combination produces a higher serum cholesterol concentration than does 16:0 in healthy normocholesterolemic young men fed a low-cholesterol diet.
    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood
  15. Tan DT, Khor HT, Low WH, Ali A, Gapor A
    Am J Clin Nutr, 1991 04;53(4 Suppl):1027S-1030S.
    PMID: 2012011 DOI: 10.1093/ajcn/53.4.1027S
    The effect of a capsulated palm-oil-vitamin E concentrate (palmvitee) on human serum and lipoprotein lipids was assessed. Each palmvitee capsule contains approximately 18, approximately 42, and approximately 240 mg of tocopherols, tocotrienols, and palm olein, respectively. All volunteers took one palmvitee capsule per day for 30 consecutive days. Overnight fasting blood was taken from each volunteer before and after the experiment. Serum lipids and lipoproteins were analyzed by using the enzymatic CHOD-PAP method. Our results showed that palmvitee lowered both serum total cholesterol (TC) and low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) concentrations in all the volunteers. The magnitude of reduction of serum TC ranged from 5.0% to 35.9% whereas the reduction of LDL-C values ranged from 0.9% to 37.0% when compared with their respective starting values. The effect of palmvitee on triglycerides (TGs) and HDL-C was not consistent. Our results show that the palmvitee has a hypocholesterolemic effect.
    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood
  16. Ng TK, Hassan K, Lim JB, Lye MS, Ishak R
    Am J Clin Nutr, 1991 04;53(4 Suppl):1015S-1020S.
    PMID: 2012009 DOI: 10.1093/ajcn/53.4.1015S
    The effects on serum lipids of diets prepared with palm olein, corn oil, and coconut oil supplying approximately 75% of the fat calories were compared in three matched groups of healthy volunteers (61 males, 22 females, aged 20-34 y). Group I received a coconut-palm-coconut dietary sequence; group II, coconut-corn-coconut; and group III, coconut oil during all three 5-wk dietary periods. Compared with entry-level values, coconut oil raised the serum total cholesterol concentration greater than 10% in all three groups. Subsequent feeding of palm olein or corn oil significantly reduced the total cholesterol (-19%, -36%), the LDL cholesterol (-20%, -42%%) and the HDL cholesterol (-20%, -26%) concentrations, respectively. Whereas the entry level of the ratio of LDL to HDL was not appreciably altered by coconut oil, this ratio was decreased 8% by palm olein and 25% by corn oil. Serum triglycerides were unaffected during the palm-olein period but were significantly reduced during the corn-oil period.
    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood
  17. Marzuki A, Arshad F, Razak TA, Jaarin K
    Am J Clin Nutr, 1991 04;53(4 Suppl):1010S-1014S.
    PMID: 1901440 DOI: 10.1093/ajcn/53.4.1010S
    We studied the effects of saturated (palm olein) and polyunsaturated (soybean oil) cooking oils on the lipid profiles of Malaysian male adolescents eating normal Malaysian diets for 5 wk. Diets cooked with palm olein did not significantly alter plasma total-cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol concentrations or the ratio of total cholesterol to HDL cholesterol compared with diets cooked with soybean oil. However, the diet cooked with palm olein significantly increased apolipoprotein A-I (11%) and apolipoprotein B (9%) concentrations. Unexpectedly, soybean-oil-cooked diets caused a significant increase (47%) in plasma triglycerides compared with palm-olein-cooked diets. We conclude that palm olein, when used as cooking oil, has no detrimental effects on plasma lipid profiles in Malaysian adolescents.
    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood
  18. Chew WF, Masyita M, Leong PP, Boo NY, Zin T, Choo KB, et al.
    Singapore Med J, 2014 Feb;55(2):84-91.
    PMID: 24570317
    INTRODUCTION: Obesity is a major modifiable risk factor associated with most chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of obesity, and its associated risk factors, among apparently healthy Chinese adults in a Malaysian suburban village.

    METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study conducted among the Chinese residents in Seri Kembangan New Village, Klang Valley, Selangor, Malaysia. Convenience sampling was used for the selection of participants. Body weight, height, waist and hip circumferences, and blood pressure were measured. Fasting venous plasma was drawn for the measurement of fasting glucose level and lipid profile. Data on sociodemographic factors, dietary habits, physical activity, perceived stress level and sleep duration were collected using interviewer-administered, pretested and validated questionnaires.

    RESULTS: Among the 258 Chinese residents (mean age 41.4 ± 10.0 years) recruited, the prevalence of obesity was 40%. The obese participants had significantly higher mean blood pressure, and triglyceride and fasting plasma glucose levels than the non-obese participants (p < 0.05). The obese participants also had a significantly lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level than the non-obese participants. Logistic regression analysis showed that drinking soy milk (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.447; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.253-0.787; p < 0.05) and the perception that a balanced diet consists mainly of vegetables (adjusted OR 0.440; 95% CI 0.215-0.900; p < 0.05) were associated with a reduced risk of obesity. The risk of obesity was higher in younger participants (adjusted OR 2.714; 95% CI 1.225-6.011; p < 0.05).

    CONCLUSION: The prevalence of obesity was high among the apparently healthy suburban Chinese. Our findings suggest that soy milk consumption and the perception that a balanced diet consists mainly of vegetables are associated with a lower risk of developing obesity in this population.
    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood
  19. Sazlina SG, Mastura I, Cheong AT, Bujang Mohamad A, Jamaiyah H, Lee PY, et al.
    Singapore Med J, 2015 May;56(5):284-90.
    PMID: 25814074 DOI: 10.11622/smedj.2015055
    Introduction: We assessed the predictors of poor glycaemic control among older patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Malaysia.
    Methods: This cross-sectional study used the data of 21,336 patients aged ≥ 60 years with T2DM from the Adult Diabetes Control and Management Registry 2008-2009.
    Results: Predictors of poor glycaemic control were: age groups 60-69 years (odds ratio [OR] 1.96, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.66-2.33) and 70-79 years (OR 1.43, 95% CI 1.20-1.71); Malay (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.41-1.66) and Indian (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.19-1.46) ethnicities; T2DM durations of 5-10 years (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.35-1.58) and > 10 years (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.59-1.91); the use of oral antidiabetic agents only (OR 5.86, 95% CI 3.32-10.34), insulin only (OR 17.93, 95% CI 9.91-32.43), and oral antidiabetic agents and insulin (OR 29.42, 95% CI 16.47-52.53); and elevated blood pressure (OR 1.10, 95% CI 1.01-1.20), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.38-1.59) and triglycerides (OR 1.61, 95% CI 1.51-1.73). Hypertension (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.64-0.80), hypertension and dyslipidaemia (OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.61-0.75), pre-obesity (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.82-0.98) and obesity (OR 0.76, 95% CI 0.70-0.84) were less likely to be associated with poor glycaemic control.
    Conclusion: Young-old and middle-old age groups (i.e. < 80 years), Malay and Indian ethnicities, longer T2DM duration, the use of pharmacological agents, and elevated blood pressure and lipid levels were associated with poor glycaemic control. The presence of comorbidities, pre-obesity and obesity were less likely to be associated with poor glycaemic control.
    Keywords: Malaysia; diabetes mellitus; glycaemic control; older patients; registry.
    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood
  20. Beh BK, Mohamad NE, Yeap SK, Ky H, Boo SY, Chua JYH, et al.
    Sci Rep, 2017 07 27;7(1):6664.
    PMID: 28751642 DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-06235-7
    Recently, food-based bioactive ingredients, such as vinegar, have been proposed as a potential solution to overcome the global obesity epidemic. Although acetic acid has been identified as the main component in vinegar that contributes to its anti-obesity effect, reports have shown that vinegar produced from different starting materials possess different degrees of bioactivity. This study was performed to compare the anti-obesity and anti-inflammatory effects of synthetic acetic acid vinegar and Nipa vinegar in mice fed a high-fat diet. In this work, mice were fed a high-fat diet for 33 weeks. At the start of week 24, obese mice were orally fed synthetic acetic acid vinegar or Nipa vinegar (0.08 and 2 ml/kg BW) until the end of week 33. Mice fed a standard pellet diet served as a control. Although both synthetic acetic acid vinegar and Nipa vinegar effectively reduced food intake and body weight, a high dose of Nipa vinegar more effectively reduced lipid deposition, improved the serum lipid profile, increased adipokine expression and suppressed inflammation in the obese mice. Thus, a high dose of Nipa vinegar may potentially alleviate obesity by altering the lipid metabolism, inflammation and gut microbe composition in high-fat-diet-induced obese mice.
    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood
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