Displaying publications 1 - 20 of 102 in total

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  1. Chong YH, Soh CC, Ho GS, Rajaratnam R, Nonis P
    Clin. Chim. Acta, 1971 Aug;34(1):85-92.
    PMID: 5118731 DOI: 10.1016/0009-8981(71)90070-2
    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood*
  2. Burns-Cox CJ, Chong YH, Gillman R
    Br Heart J, 1972 Sep;34(9):953-8.
    PMID: 4116420
    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood
  3. Ng TK, Chong YH
    Med J Malaysia, 1975 Mar;30(3):169-74.
    PMID: 169458
    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood
  4. Chong YH, Khoo KL
    Clin. Chim. Acta, 1975 Nov 15;65(1):143-8.
    PMID: 172262 DOI: 10.1016/0009-8981(75)90346-0
    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood*
  5. Wilhelmsen L
    Med J Malaysia, 1977 Jun;31(4):296-301.
    PMID: 927236
    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood
  6. Jones JJ, Watkins PJ, Owyong LY, Loh PP, Kutty MK, Jogie B
    Trop Geogr Med, 1978 Dec;30(4):439-49.
    PMID: 749278
    One hundred and thirty-two newly diagnosed Asian diabetic patients (39 Malay, 30 Chinese and 63 Indians) have been studied in Kuala Lumpur. The highest proportion of diabetic patients were Indian and the lowest were Chinese. Vascular complications were equally common in Asian diabetic patients as in Europeans; coronary heart disease was relatively more common in Indians and cerebral vascular disease in Chinese. Twenty percent of all Asian diabetic patients requiring admission to hospital also had coronary heart disease, 9% had cerebral vascular disease and 8% had gangrene or ulceration of the feet. In Kuala Lumpur, diabetes is a very important risk factor for coronary heart disease: 17% of all patients admitted to the General Hospital with coronary heart disease were already diabetic.
    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood
  7. Sundram K, Khor HT, Ong AS
    Lipids, 1990 Apr;25(4):187-93.
    PMID: 2345491
    Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed semipurified diets containing 20% fat for 15 weeks. The dietary fats were corn oil, soybean oil, palm oil, palm olein and palm stearin. No differences in the body and organ weights of rats fed the various diets were evident. Plasma cholesterol levels of rats fed soybean oil were significantly lower than those of rats fed corn oil, palm oil, palm olein or palm stearin. Significant differences between the plasma cholesterol content of rats fed corn oil and rats fed the three palm oils were not evident. HDL cholesterol was raised in rats fed the three palm oil diets compared to the rats fed either corn oil or soybean oil. The cholesterol-phospholipid molar ratio of rat platelets was not influenced by the dietary fat type. The formation of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha was significantly enhanced in palm oil-fed rats compared to all other dietary treatments. Fatty acid compositional changes in the plasma cholesterol esters and plasma triglycerides were diet regulated with significant differences between rats fed the polyunsaturated corn and soybean oil compared to the three palm oils.
    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood
  8. Tan DT, Khor HT, Low WH, Ali A, Gapor A
    Am J Clin Nutr, 1991 04;53(4 Suppl):1027S-1030S.
    PMID: 2012011 DOI: 10.1093/ajcn/53.4.1027S
    The effect of a capsulated palm-oil-vitamin E concentrate (palmvitee) on human serum and lipoprotein lipids was assessed. Each palmvitee capsule contains approximately 18, approximately 42, and approximately 240 mg of tocopherols, tocotrienols, and palm olein, respectively. All volunteers took one palmvitee capsule per day for 30 consecutive days. Overnight fasting blood was taken from each volunteer before and after the experiment. Serum lipids and lipoproteins were analyzed by using the enzymatic CHOD-PAP method. Our results showed that palmvitee lowered both serum total cholesterol (TC) and low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) concentrations in all the volunteers. The magnitude of reduction of serum TC ranged from 5.0% to 35.9% whereas the reduction of LDL-C values ranged from 0.9% to 37.0% when compared with their respective starting values. The effect of palmvitee on triglycerides (TGs) and HDL-C was not consistent. Our results show that the palmvitee has a hypocholesterolemic effect.
    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood
  9. Ng TK, Hassan K, Lim JB, Lye MS, Ishak R
    Am J Clin Nutr, 1991 04;53(4 Suppl):1015S-1020S.
    PMID: 2012009 DOI: 10.1093/ajcn/53.4.1015S
    The effects on serum lipids of diets prepared with palm olein, corn oil, and coconut oil supplying approximately 75% of the fat calories were compared in three matched groups of healthy volunteers (61 males, 22 females, aged 20-34 y). Group I received a coconut-palm-coconut dietary sequence; group II, coconut-corn-coconut; and group III, coconut oil during all three 5-wk dietary periods. Compared with entry-level values, coconut oil raised the serum total cholesterol concentration greater than 10% in all three groups. Subsequent feeding of palm olein or corn oil significantly reduced the total cholesterol (-19%, -36%), the LDL cholesterol (-20%, -42%%) and the HDL cholesterol (-20%, -26%) concentrations, respectively. Whereas the entry level of the ratio of LDL to HDL was not appreciably altered by coconut oil, this ratio was decreased 8% by palm olein and 25% by corn oil. Serum triglycerides were unaffected during the palm-olein period but were significantly reduced during the corn-oil period.
    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood
  10. Marzuki A, Arshad F, Razak TA, Jaarin K
    Am J Clin Nutr, 1991 04;53(4 Suppl):1010S-1014S.
    PMID: 1901440 DOI: 10.1093/ajcn/53.4.1010S
    We studied the effects of saturated (palm olein) and polyunsaturated (soybean oil) cooking oils on the lipid profiles of Malaysian male adolescents eating normal Malaysian diets for 5 wk. Diets cooked with palm olein did not significantly alter plasma total-cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol concentrations or the ratio of total cholesterol to HDL cholesterol compared with diets cooked with soybean oil. However, the diet cooked with palm olein significantly increased apolipoprotein A-I (11%) and apolipoprotein B (9%) concentrations. Unexpectedly, soybean-oil-cooked diets caused a significant increase (47%) in plasma triglycerides compared with palm-olein-cooked diets. We conclude that palm olein, when used as cooking oil, has no detrimental effects on plasma lipid profiles in Malaysian adolescents.
    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood
  11. Ng TK, Hayes KC, DeWitt GF, Jegathesan M, Satgunasingam N, Ong AS, et al.
    J Am Coll Nutr, 1992 Aug;11(4):383-90.
    PMID: 1506599
    To compare the effects of dietary palmitic acid (16:0) vs oleic acid (18:1) on serum lipids, lipoproteins, and plasma eicosanoids, 33 normocholesterolemic subjects (20 males, 13 females; ages 22-41 years) were challenged with a coconut oil-rich diet for 4 weeks. Subsequently they were assigned to either a palm olein-rich or olive oil-rich diet followed by a dietary crossover during two consecutive 6-week periods. Each test oil served as the sole cooking oil and contributed 23% of dietary energy or two-thirds of the total daily fat intake. Dietary myristic acid (14:0) and lauric acid (12:0) from coconut oil significantly raised all the serum lipid and lipoprotein parameters measured. Subsequent one-to-one exchange of 7% energy between 16:0 (palm olein diet) and 18:1 (olive oil diet) resulted in identical serum total cholesterol (192, 193 mg/dl), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (130, 131 mg/dl), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) (41, 42 mg/dl), and triglyceride (TG) (108, 106 mg/dl) concentrations. Effects attributed to gender included higher HDL in females and higher TG in males associated with the tendency for higher LDL and LDL/HDL ratios in men. However, both sexes were equally responsive to changes in dietary fat saturation. The results indicate that in healthy, normocholesterolemic humans, dietary 16:0 can be exchanged for 18:1 within the range of these fatty acids normally present in typical diets without affecting the serum lipoprotein cholesterol concentration or distribution. In addition, replacement of 12:0 + 14:0 by 16:0 + 18:1, but especially 16:0 or some component of palm olein, appeared to have a beneficial impact on an important index of thrombogenesis, i.e., the thromboxane/prostacyclin ratio in plasma.
    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood
  12. Tariq AR, Maheendran K, Kamsiah J, Christina P
    Med J Malaysia, 1992 Sep;47(3):182-9.
    PMID: 1491643
    Twenty eight patients who satisfied the entry criteria and had completed an initial 2 weeks treatment with placebo were titrated fortnightly with doses of Nicardipine ranging from 30 mg to 90 mg daily in two or three divided doses. Nicardipine treatment significantly reduced blood pressures both in the supine and standing positions (p < 0.0004) when compared with placebo treatment. Heart rates however did not change significantly. Forty six percent (13/28) of patients on 20 mg twice daily, 25% (7/28) on 10 mg three times daily, 18% (5/28) of patients on 20 mg three times daily and 11% (3/28) on 30 mg three times daily achieved supine diastolic blood pressures < 90 mm Hg. Nicardipine treatment at 16 weeks and at 24 weeks did not significantly alter the lipid profile when compared to the end of placebo treatment period. No other biochemical abnormalities were reported during the study period. Except for 2 cases of mild pedal oedema and 2 cases of transient headaches, no serious side-effects were encountered.
    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood
  13. Ng TK
    Med J Malaysia, 1993 Mar;48(1):12-6.
    PMID: 8341167
    Postprandial changes in plasma total cholesterol (TC) are minimal and there is essentially no difference between fasting vs random TC concentrations, as reflected in the small diurnal coefficient of variation (CV) for TC of 2.5%. Similarly, a cholesterol-rich meal within the last 24 hours lacked an impact on plasma TC. Thus, random specimens are acceptable in blood cholesterol screening. The intraindividual biological CV (CVb) for plasma TC as measured over a long period was estimated from the data of several published studies to be 6.0%, which, when combined with a probable analytical CV (CVa) of 5% during screening, gave a total intraindividual CV (CVt) of about 8% for the single cholesterol assay. There is consensus that 'high TC values' acquired during screening should be confirmed under the conventional laboratory setting capable of CVa of 3% or less.
    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood
  14. Loke DF, Viegas OA, Ratnam SS
    Gynecol. Obstet. Invest., 1993;36(2):108-13.
    PMID: 8225044
    Serum lipid profiles were studied in 167 healthy fertile Singaporean women, aged between 18 and 40 and comprising 114 Chinese, 28 Malays and 25 Indians. Parity or ethnic differences did not affect lipid concentrations. Except for triglycerides which showed a decreasing trend, there was no significant variation in lipid concentrations with age. However, all lipid concentrations except HDL cholesterol (which decreased) appeared to increase with body mass index. Compared with other populations, these Singaporean women appeared to have higher mean concentrations of total cholesterol and lower mean concentrations of HDL cholesterol. The possibility that these differences could have contributed to the increasing incidence of coronary heart disease in Singapore is discussed.
    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood*
  15. Sundram K, Hayes KC, Siru OH
    Am J Clin Nutr, 1994 Apr;59(4):841-6.
    PMID: 8147328
    In a double-blind crossover study, 17 normocholesterolemic male volunteers were fed carefully designed whole-food diets in which 5% of energy was exchanged between palmitic (16:0) and lauric + myristic acids (12:0 + 14:0) whereas all other fatty acids were held constant. Resident males received each diet during separate 4-wk periods. The test diets supplied approximately 30% of energy as fat and 200 mg cholesterol/d. Compared with the 12:0 + 14:0-rich diet, the 16:0-rich diet produced a 9% lower serum cholesterol concentration, reflected primarily by a lower (11%) low-density-lipoprotein-cholesterol concentration and, to a lesser extent, high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol. No diet-induced changes were noted in the cholesterol content of other lipoproteins, nor did exchange of saturated fatty acids affect the triglyceride concentration in serum or lipoprotein fractions. These data indicate that a dietary 12:0 + 14:0 combination produces a higher serum cholesterol concentration than does 16:0 in healthy normocholesterolemic young men fed a low-cholesterol diet.
    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood
  16. Gajra B, Candlish JK, Saha N, Mak JW, Tay JS
    Hum. Hered., 1994 Jul-Aug;44(4):209-13.
    PMID: 8056432
    Members of the Semai group of Orang Asli ('aborigines') in peninsular Malaysia were examined for apolipoprotein E (apo E) variants in relation to plasma total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLC), triglycerides (TG), apolipoprotein AI and apolipoprotein B (apo B). The e2 and e4 alleles were found to be higher than in most other groups as reported. The sample as a whole was normotriglyceridaemic (mean plasma TG, 1.5 mmol/l) and very markedly hypocholesterolaemic (mean plasma TC 1.7 mmol/l). The distribution of apo E variants was not related to any of the plasma lipids or apolipoprotein fractions using results from all subjects, but if a distinctly hypertriglyceridaemic sub-section was omitted (TG > 1.7 mmol/l) then apo E variants were determinants of plasma TC, LDLC, and apo B concentrations, the lower values of these being associated with the 2-2 and 2-3 genotypes, and the higher with 3-4, and 4-4.
    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood*
  17. Choo KE, Davis TM, Mansur MA, Azman E, Achana S
    J Paediatr Child Health, 1996 Oct;32(5):428-32.
    PMID: 8933405
    OBJECTIVE: Preliminary epidemiological data suggest that dyslipidaemia contributes significantly to rising mortality due to atherosclerosis in Peninsular Malays. The aim of this study was to determine whether abnormal serum lipid profiles are present at birth in this population.

    METHODOLOGY: The patients were 487 non-diabetic Malay women who had an uncomplicated antenatal course and delivered healthy singleton babies at term. Cord blood and maternal post-partum venous blood samples were taken for assay of serum cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations using standard enzymatic methods.

    RESULTS: Maternal total serum cholesterol concentrations (mean +/- SD; 7.5 +/- 2.5 mmol/L) were higher than in other reported series (range of published means 5.2-6.5 mmol/L) with a correspondingly low high-density lipoprotein (HDL): total cholesterol ratio. The mean cord blood total serum cholesterol (1.7 +/- 1.0 mmol/L) was consistent with previously reported population means (1.5-1.9 mmol/L) but there was a relatively high low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol and depressed HDL: cholesterol ratio. Significant correlations between maternal and neonatal serum total (P = 0.038) and especially HDL-cholesterol (P < 0.001) were observed. Maternal and cord blood serum triglyceride levels were comparable to those in other series.

    CONCLUSIONS: These cross-sectional data provide evidence that abnormal serum cholesterol profiles are found in pregnant Malay women and their neonates which may have implications for the prevalence of macrovascular disease in the Malay population.

    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood
  18. Low PS, Saha N, Tay JS, Hong S
    Acta Paediatr, 1996 Dec;85(12):1476-82.
    PMID: 9001661
    In multiracial Singapore, the prevalence of coronary artery disease is highest in ethnic Indian and lowest in ethnic Chinese populations. Since susceptibility to coronary artery disease is closely associated with plasma lipid traits, we studied the cord blood lipid and apolipoprotein profiles of the three ethnic groups in Singapore to determine if ethnic differences in lipid profile are present at birth. The high-risk lipid traits of high LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides and apo B, low HDL-cholesterol and apo A-I were found to be highest in ethnic Indian and lowest in ethnic Chinese populations. This difference was concordant with the relative coronary mortality rates for their respective adult populations in Singapore.
    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood
  19. Islam N, Kazmi F, Chusney GD, Mattock MB, Zaini A, Pickup JC
    Diabetes Care, 1998 Mar;21(3):385-8.
    PMID: 9540020
    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether microalbuminuria is associated with markers of the acute-phase response in NIDDM and whether there are ethnic differences in this association among the three main racial groups in Malaysia.

    RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: NIDDM patients of Chinese, Indian, and Malay origin attending a diabetic clinic in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, were matched for age, sex, diabetes duration, and glycemic control (n = 34 in each group). Urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio was measured in an early morning urine sample. Biochemical measurements included markers of the acute-phase response: serum sialic acid, triglyceride, and (lowered) HDL cholesterol.

    RESULTS: The frequency of microalbuminuria did not differ among the Chinese, Indian, and Malay patients (44, 41, and 47%, respectively). In Chinese patients, those with microalbuminuria had evidence of an augmented acute-phase response, with higher serum sialic acid and triglyceride and lower HDL cholesterol levels; and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio was correlated with serum sialic acid and triglyceride. The acute-phase response markers were not different in Indians, with microalbuminuria being high in even the normoalbuminuric Indians; only the mean arterial blood pressure was correlated with urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio in the Indians. Malay NIDDM subjects had an association of microalbuminuria with acute-phase markers, but this was weaker than in the Chinese subjects.

    CONCLUSIONS: Microalbuminuria is associated with an acute-phase response in Chinese NIDDM patients in Malaysia, as previously found in Caucasian NIDDM subjects. Elevated urinary albumin excretion has different correlates in other racial groups, such as those originating from the Indian subcontinent. The acute-phase response may have an etiological role in microalbuminuria.

    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood
  20. Tan CE, Emmanuel SC, Tan BY, Jacob E
    Diabetes Care, 1999 Feb;22(2):241-7.
    PMID: 10333940 DOI: 10.2337/diacare.22.2.241
    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the 1992 Singapore National Health Survey was to determine the current distribution of major noncommunicable diseases and their risk factors, including the prevalence of diabetes and dyslipidemia, in Singapore.

    RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A combination of disproportionate stratified sampling and systematic sampling were used to select the sample for the survey. The final number of respondents was 3,568, giving a response rate of 72.6%. All subjects fasted for 10 h and were given a 75-g glucose load, except those known to have diabetes. Blood was taken before and 2 h after the glucose load. Diagnosis of diabetes was based on 2-h glucose alone.

    RESULTS: The age-standardized prevalence of diabetes in Singapore residents aged 18-69 years was 8.4%, with more than half (58.5%) previously undiagnosed. Prevalence of diabetes was high across all three ethnic groups. The prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance was 16.1%, that of hypertension was 6.5%, and 19.0% were regular smokers. The total cholesterol (mean +/- SD) of nondiabetic Singaporeans was 5.18 +/- 1.02 mmol/l; 47.9% had cholesterol > 5.2 mmol/l, while 15.4% had levels > 6.3 mmol/l. Mean LDL cholesterol was 3.31 +/- 0.89 mmol/l; HDL cholesterol was 1.30 +/- 0.32 mmol/l, and triglyceride was 1.23 +/- 0.82 mmol/l.

    CONCLUSIONS: Prevalence of diabetes was high across all three ethnic groups. Ethnic differences in prevalence of diabetes, insulin resistance, central obesity, hypertension, smoking, and lipid profile could explain the differential coronary heart disease rates in the three major ethnic groups in Singapore.
    Matched MeSH terms: Triglycerides/blood
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