Displaying publications 1 - 20 of 313 in total

Abstract:
Sort:
  1. Alkhader E, Billa N, Roberts CJ
    AAPS PharmSciTech, 2017 May;18(4):1009-1018.
    PMID: 27582072 DOI: 10.1208/s12249-016-0623-y
    In the present study, we report the properties of a mucoadhesive chitosan-pectinate nanoparticulate formulation able to retain its integrity in the milieu of the upper gastrointestinal tract and subsequently, mucoadhere and release curcumin in colon conditions. Using this system, we aimed to deliver curcumin to the colon for the possible management of colorectal cancer. The delivery system comprised of a chitosan-pectinate composite nanopolymeric with a z-average of 206.0 nm (±6.6 nm) and zeta potential of +32.8 mV (±0.5 mV) and encapsulation efficiency of 64%. The nanoparticles mucoadhesiveness was higher at alkaline pH compared to acidic pH. Furthermore, more than 80% release of curcumin was achieved in pectinase-enriched medium (pH 6.4) as opposed to negligible release in acidic and enzyme-restricted media at pH 6.8. SEM images of the nanoparticles after exposure to the various media indicate a retained matrix in acid media as opposed to a distorted/fragmented matrix in pectinase-enriched medium. The data strongly indicates that the system has the potential to be applied as a colon-targeted mucoadhesive curcumin delivery system for the possible treatment of colon cancer.
    Matched MeSH terms: Biocompatible Materials/pharmacology; Biocompatible Materials/chemistry
  2. Qasim SSB, Nogueria LP, Fawzy AS, Daood U
    AAPS PharmSciTech, 2020 Jun 16;21(5):173.
    PMID: 32548717 DOI: 10.1208/s12249-020-01708-x
    Innovative strategies for periodontal regeneration have been the focus of research clusters across the globe for decades. In order to overcome the drawbacks of currently available options, investigators have suggested a novel concept of functionally graded membrane (FGM) templates with different structural and morphological gradients. Chitosan (CH) has been used in the past for similar purpose. However, the composite formulation of composite and tetracycline when cross-linked with glutaraldehyde have received little attention. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to investigate the drug loading and release characteristics of novel freeze gelated chitosan templates at different percentages of glutaraldehyde. These were cross-linked with 0.1 and 1% glutaraldehyde and loaded with doxycycline hyclate. The electron micrographs depicted porous morphology of neat templates. After cross-linking, these templates showed compressed ultrastructures. Computerized tomography analysis showed that the templates had 88 to 92% porosity with average pore diameter decreased from 78 to 44.9 μm with increasing concentration. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed alterations in the glycosidic segment of chitosan fingerprint region which after drug loading showed a dominant doxycycline spectral composite profile. Interestingly, swelling profile was not affected by cross-linking either at 0.1 and 1% glutaraldehyde and template showed a swelling ratio of 80%, which gained equilibrium after 15 min. The drug release pattern also showed a 40 μg/mL of release after 24 h. These doxycycline-loaded templates show their tendency to be used in a functionally graded membrane facing the defect site.
    Matched MeSH terms: Biocompatible Materials/pharmacokinetics; Biocompatible Materials/chemistry*
  3. Mehrali M, Moghaddam E, Shirazi SF, Baradaran S, Mehrali M, Latibari ST, et al.
    ACS Appl Mater Interfaces, 2014 Mar 26;6(6):3947-62.
    PMID: 24588873 DOI: 10.1021/am500845x
    Calcium silicate (CaSiO3, CS) ceramics are promising bioactive materials for bone tissue engineering, particularly for bone repair. However, the low toughness of CS limits its application in load-bearing conditions. Recent findings indicating the promising biocompatibility of graphene imply that graphene can be used as an additive to improve the mechanical properties of composites. Here, we report a simple method for the synthesis of calcium silicate/reduced graphene oxide (CS/rGO) composites using a hydrothermal approach followed by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). Adding rGO to pure CS increased the hardness of the material by ∼40%, the elastic modulus by ∼52%, and the fracture toughness by ∼123%. Different toughening mechanisms were observed including crack bridging, crack branching, crack deflection, and rGO pull-out, thus increasing the resistance to crack propagation and leading to a considerable improvement in the fracture toughness of the composites. The formation of bone-like apatite on a range of CS/rGO composites with rGO weight percentages ranging from 0 to 1.5 has been investigated in simulated body fluid (SBF). The presence of a bone-like apatite layer on the composite surface after soaking in SBF was demonstrated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The biocompatibility of the CS/rGO composites was characterized using methyl thiazole tetrazolium (MTT) assays in vitro. The cell adhesion results showed that human osteoblast cells (hFOB) can adhere to and develop on the CS/rGO composites. In addition, the proliferation rate and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of cells on the CS/rGO composites were improved compared with the pure CS ceramics. These results suggest that calcium silicate/reduced graphene oxide composites are promising materials for biomedical applications.
    Matched MeSH terms: Biocompatible Materials/chemical synthesis; Biocompatible Materials/chemistry*
  4. Xi Loh EY, Fauzi MB, Ng MH, Ng PY, Ng SF, Ariffin H, et al.
    ACS Appl Mater Interfaces, 2018 Nov 21;10(46):39532-39543.
    PMID: 30372014 DOI: 10.1021/acsami.8b16645
    The evaluation of the interaction of cells with biomaterials is fundamental to establish the suitability of the biomaterial for a specific application. In this study, the properties of bacterial nanocellulose/acrylic acid (BNC/AA) hydrogels fabricated with varying BNC to AA ratios and electron-beam irradiation doses were determined. The manner these hydrogel properties influence the behavior of human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) at the cellular and molecular levels was also investigated, relating it to its application both as a cell carrier and wound dressing material. Swelling, hardness, adhesive force (wet), porosity, and hydrophilicity (dry) of the hydrogels were dependent on the degree of cross-linking and the amount of AA incorporated in the hydrogels. However, water vapor transmission rate, pore size, hydrophilicity (semidry), and topography were similar between all formulations, leading to a similar cell attachment and proliferation profile. At the cellular level, the hydrogel demonstrated rapid cell adhesion, maintained HDFs viability and morphology, restricted cellular migration, and facilitated fast transfer of cells. At the molecular level, the hydrogel affected nine wound-healing genes (IL6, IL10, MMP2, CTSK, FGF7, GM-CSF, TGFB1, COX2, and F3). The findings indicate that the BNC/AA hydrogel is a potential biomaterial that can be employed as a wound-dressing material to incorporate HDFs for the acceleration of wound healing.
    Matched MeSH terms: Biocompatible Materials
  5. Ali MK, Moshikur RM, Wakabayashi R, Moniruzzaman M, Goto M
    ACS Appl Mater Interfaces, 2021 May 05;13(17):19745-19755.
    PMID: 33891816 DOI: 10.1021/acsami.1c03111
    Chemotherapeutic cytotoxic agents such as paclitaxel (PTX) are considered essential for the treatment of various cancers. However, PTX injection is associated with severe systemic side effects and high rates of patient noncompliance. Micelle formulations (MFs) are nano-drug delivery systems that offer a solution to these problems. Herein, we report an advantageous carrier for the transdermal delivery of PTX comprising a new MF that consists of two biocompatible surfactants: cholinium oleate ([Cho][Ole]), which is a surface-active ionic liquid (SAIL), and sorbitan monolaurate (Span-20). A solubility assessment confirmed that PTX was readily solubilized in the SAIL-based micelles via multipoint hydrogen bonding and cation-π and π-π interactions between PTX and SAIL[Cho][Ole]. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy revealed that in the presence of PTX, the MF formed spherical PTX-loaded micelles that were well-distributed in the range 8.7-25.3 nm. According to DLS, the sizes and size distributions of the micelle droplets did not change significantly over the entire storage period, attesting to their physical stability. In vitro transdermal assessments using a Franz diffusion cell revealed that the MF absorbed PTX 4 times more effectively than a Tween 80-based formulation and 6 times more effectively than an ethanol-based formulation. In vitro and in vivo skin irritation tests revealed that the new carrier had a negligible toxicity profile compared with a conventional ionic liquid-based carrier. Based on these findings, we believe that the SAIL[Cho][Ole]-based MF has potential as a biocompatible nanocarrier for the effective transdermal delivery of poorly soluble chemotherapeutics such as PTX.
    Matched MeSH terms: Biocompatible Materials*
  6. Huang X, Shan L, Cheng K, Weng W
    ACS Biomater Sci Eng, 2017 Dec 11;3(12):3254-3260.
    PMID: 33445368 DOI: 10.1021/acsbiomaterials.7b00551
    The topography at the micro/nanoscale level for biomaterial surfaces has been thought to play vital roles in their interactions with cells. However, discovering the interdisciplinary mechanisms underlying how cells respond to micro-nanostructured topography features still remains a challenge. In this work, ∼37 μm 3D printing used titanium microspheres and their further hierarchical micro-nanostructured spheres through hydrothermal treatment were adopted to construct typical model surface topographies to study the preosteoblastic cell responses (adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation). We here demonstrated that not only the hierarchical micro-nanostructured surface topography but also their distribution density played critical role on cell cytocompatibility. The microstructured topography feature surface with middle-density distributed titanium microspheres showed significantly enhanced cell responses, which might be attributed to the better cellular interaction due to the cell aggregates. However, the hierarchical micro-nanostructured topography surface, regardless of the distribution density of titanium microspheres, improved the cell-surface interactions because of the enhanced initial protein adsorption, thereby reducing the cell aggregates and consequently their responses. This work, therefore, provides new insights into the fundamental understanding of cell-material interactions and will have a profound impact on further designing micro-nanostructured topography surfaces to control cell responses.
    Matched MeSH terms: Biocompatible Materials
  7. Lee SY, Pereira BP, Yusof N, Selvaratnam L, Yu Z, Abbas AA, et al.
    Acta Biomater, 2009 Jul;5(6):1919-25.
    PMID: 19289306 DOI: 10.1016/j.actbio.2009.02.014
    A poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogel composite scaffold containing N,O-carboxymethylated chitosan (NOCC) was tested to assess its potential as a scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering in a weight-bearing environment. The mechanical properties under unconfined compression for different hydration periods were investigated. The effect of supplementing PVA with NOCC (20wt.% PVA:5vol.% NOCC) produced a porosity of 43.3% and this was compared against a non-porous PVA hydrogel (20g PVA: 100ml of water, control). Under non-hydrated conditions, the porous PVA-NOCC hydrogel behaved in a similar way to the control non-porous PVA hydrogel, with similar non-linear stress-strain response under unconfined compression (0-30% strain). After 7days' hydration, the porous hydrogel demonstrated a reduced stiffness (0.002kPa, at 25% strain), resulting in a more linear stiffness relationship over a range of 0-30% strain. Poisson's ratio for the hydrated non-porous and porous hydrogels ranged between 0.73 and 1.18, and 0.76 and 1.33, respectively, suggesting a greater fluid flow when loaded. The stress relaxation function for the porous hydrogel was affected by the hydration period (from 0 to 600s); however the percentage stress relaxation regained by about 95%, after 1200s for all hydration periods assessed. No significant differences were found between the different hydration periods between the porous hydrogels and control. The calculated aggregate modulus, H(A), for the porous hydrogel reduced drastically from 10.99kPa in its non-hydrated state to about 0.001kPa after 7days' hydration, with the calculated shear modulus reducing from 30.92 to 0.14kPa, respectively. The porous PVA-NOCC hydrogel conformed to a biphasic, viscoelastic model, which has the desired properties required for any scaffold in cartilage tissue engineering.
    Matched MeSH terms: Biocompatible Materials/chemistry*
  8. Sharifzadeh G, Hosseinkhani H
    Adv Healthc Mater, 2017 Dec;6(24).
    PMID: 29057617 DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201700801
    Recent advances and applications of biomolecule-responsive hydrogels, namely, glucose-responsive hydrogels, protein-responsive hydrogels, and nucleic-acid-responsive hydrogels are highlighted. However, achieving the ultimate purpose of using biomolecule-responsive hydrogels in preclinical and clinical areas is still at the very early stage and calls for more novel designing concepts and advance ideas. On the way toward the real/clinical application of biomolecule-responsive hydrogels, plenty of factors should be extensively studied and examined under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. For example, biocompatibility, biointegration, and toxicity of biomolecule-responsive hydrogels should be carefully evaluated. From the living body's point of view, biocompatibility is seriously depended on the interactions at the tissue/polymer interface. These interactions are influenced by physical nature, chemical structure, surface properties, and degradation of the materials. In addition, the developments of advanced hydrogels with tunable biological and mechanical properties which cause no/low side effects are of great importance.
    Matched MeSH terms: Biocompatible Materials/chemistry*
  9. Pourshahrestani S, Zeimaran E, Kadri NA, Mutlu N, Boccaccini AR
    Adv Healthc Mater, 2020 10;9(20):e2000905.
    PMID: 32940025 DOI: 10.1002/adhm.202000905
    Broad interest in developing new hemostatic technologies arises from unmet needs in mitigating uncontrolled hemorrhage in emergency, surgical, and battlefield settings. Although a variety of hemostats, sealants, and adhesives are available, development of ideal hemostatic compositions that offer a range of remarkable properties including capability to effectively and immediately manage bleeding, excellent mechanical properties, biocompatibility, biodegradability, antibacterial effect, and strong tissue adhesion properties, under wet and dynamic conditions, still remains a challenge. Benefiting from tunable mechanical properties, high porosity, biocompatibility, injectability and ease of handling, polymeric hydrogels with outstanding hemostatic properties have been receiving increasing attention over the past several years. In this review, after shedding light on hemostasis and wound healing processes, the most recent progresses in hydrogel systems engineered from natural and synthetic polymers for hemostatic applications are discussed based on a comprehensive literature review. Most studies described used in vivo models with accessible and compressible wounds to assess the hemostatic performance of hydrogels. The challenges that need to be tackled to accelerate the translation of these novel hemostatic hydrogel systems to clinical practice are emphasized and future directions for research in the field are presented.
    Matched MeSH terms: Biocompatible Materials*
  10. Liu J, Tan CSY, Yu Z, Li N, Abell C, Scherman OA
    Adv. Mater. Weinheim, 2017 Jun;29(22).
    PMID: 28370560 DOI: 10.1002/adma.201605325
    Recent progress on highly tough and stretchable polymer networks has highlighted the potential of wearable electronic devices and structural biomaterials such as cartilage. For some given applications, a combination of desirable mechanical properties including stiffness, strength, toughness, damping, fatigue resistance, and self-healing ability is required. However, integrating such a rigorous set of requirements imposes substantial complexity and difficulty in the design and fabrication of these polymer networks, and has rarely been realized. Here, we describe the construction of supramolecular polymer networks through an in situ copolymerization of acrylamide and functional monomers, which are dynamically complexed with the host molecule cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]). High molecular weight, thus sufficient chain entanglement, combined with a small-amount dynamic CB[8]-mediated non-covalent crosslinking (2.5 mol%), yields extremely stretchable and tough supramolecular polymer networks, exhibiting remarkable self-healing capability at room temperature. These supramolecular polymer networks can be stretched more than 100× their original length and are able to lift objects 2000× their weight. The reversible association/dissociation of the host-guest complexes bestows the networks with remarkable energy dissipation capability, but also facile complete self-healing at room temperature. In addition to their outstanding mechanical properties, the networks are ionically conductive and transparent. The CB[8]-based supramolecular networks are synthetically accessible in large scale and exhibit outstanding mechanical properties. They could readily lead to the promising use as wearable and self-healable electronic devices, sensors and structural biomaterials.
    Matched MeSH terms: Biocompatible Materials
  11. Mehrali M, Thakur A, Pennisi CP, Talebian S, Arpanaei A, Nikkhah M, et al.
    Adv. Mater. Weinheim, 2017 Feb;29(8).
    PMID: 27966826 DOI: 10.1002/adma.201603612
    Given their highly porous nature and excellent water retention, hydrogel-based biomaterials can mimic critical properties of the native cellular environment. However, their potential to emulate the electromechanical milieu of native tissues or conform well with the curved topology of human organs needs to be further explored to address a broad range of physiological demands of the body. In this regard, the incorporation of nanomaterials within hydrogels has shown great promise, as a simple one-step approach, to generate multifunctional scaffolds with previously unattainable biological, mechanical, and electrical properties. Here, recent advances in the fabrication and application of nanocomposite hydrogels in tissue engineering applications are described, with specific attention toward skeletal and electroactive tissues, such as cardiac, nerve, bone, cartilage, and skeletal muscle. Additionally, some potential uses of nanoreinforced hydrogels within the emerging disciplines of cyborganics, bionics, and soft biorobotics are highlighted.
    Matched MeSH terms: Biocompatible Materials
  12. Chowdhury SR, Mh Busra MF, Lokanathan Y, Ng MH, Law JX, Cletus UC, et al.
    Adv Exp Med Biol, 2018 10 26;1077:389-414.
    PMID: 30357700 DOI: 10.1007/978-981-13-0947-2_21
    Collagen type I is the most abundant matrix protein in the human body and is highly demanded in tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and pharmaceutical applications. To meet the uprising demand in biomedical applications, collagen type I has been isolated from mammalians (bovine, porcine, goat and rat) and non-mammalians (fish, amphibian, and sea plant) source using various extraction techniques. Recent advancement enables fabrication of collagen scaffolds in multiple forms such as film, sponge, and hydrogel, with or without other biomaterials. The scaffolds are extensively used to develop tissue substitutes in regenerating or repairing diseased or damaged tissues. The 3D scaffolds are also used to develop in vitro model and as a vehicle for delivering drugs or active compounds.
    Matched MeSH terms: Biocompatible Materials*
  13. Jaganathan SK, Mani MP
    An. Acad. Bras. Cienc., 2019 Jul 29;91(3):e20180237.
    PMID: 31365648 DOI: 10.1590/0001-3765201920180237
    The aim of this study was to develop polyurethane (PU) wound dressing incorporated with cobalt nitrate using electrospinning technique. The morphology analysis revealed that the developed composites exhibited reduced fiber and pore diameter than the pristine PU. The electrospun membranes exhibited average porosity in the range of 67% - 71%. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectra (EDS) showed the presence of cobalt in the PU matrix. The interaction of cobalt nitrate with PU matrix was evident in Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The contact angle results indicated the improved wettability of the prepared PU/cobalt nitrate composites (82° ± 2) than the pure PU (100° ± 1). The incorporation of cobalt nitrate into the PU matrix enhanced the surface roughness and mechanical strength as evident in the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and tensile test analysis. The blood compatibility assays revealed the anticoagulant nature of the prepared composites by displaying prolonged blood clotting time than the PU control. Further, the developed composite exhibited less toxicity nature as revealed in the hemolysis and cytotoxicity studies. It was observed that the PU wound dressing added with cobalt nitrate fibers exhibited enhanced physicochemical, better blood compatibility parameters and enhanced fibroblast proliferation rates which may serve as a potential candidate for wound dressings.
    Matched MeSH terms: Biocompatible Materials/administration & dosage*; Biocompatible Materials/chemistry
  14. Jaganathan SK, Mani MP
    An. Acad. Bras. Cienc., 2020;92(1):e20180369.
    PMID: 32236296 DOI: 10.1590/0001-3765202020180369
    Ayurveda oil contains numerous source of biological constituents which plays an important role in reducing the pain relief caused during bone fracture. The aim of the study is to fabricate the polyurethane (PU) scaffold for bone tissue engineering added with ayurveda amla oil using electrospinning technique. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis showed that the fabricated nanocomposites showed reduced fiber diameter (758 ± 185.46 nm) than the pristine PU (890 ± 116.91 nm). Fourier Infrared Analysis (FTIR) revealed the existence of amla oil in the PU matrix by hydrogen bond formation. The contact angle results revealed the decreased wettability (116° ± 1.528) of the prepared nanocomposites compared to the pure PU (100° ± 0.5774). The incorporation of amla oil into the PU matrix improved the surface roughness. Further, the coagulation assay indicated that the addition of amla oil into PU delayed the blood clotting times and exhibited less toxic to red blood cells. Hence, the fabricated nanocomposites showed enhanced physicochemical and better blood compatibility parameters which may serve as a potential candidate for bone tissue engineering.
    Matched MeSH terms: Biocompatible Materials/analysis*
  15. Yu Z, Liu J, Tan CSY, Scherman OA, Abell C
    Angew Chem Int Ed Engl, 2018 03 12;57(12):3079-3083.
    PMID: 29377541 DOI: 10.1002/anie.201711522
    The ability to construct self-healing scaffolds that are injectable and capable of forming a designed morphology offers the possibility to engineer sustainable materials. Herein, we introduce supramolecular nested microbeads that can be used as building blocks to construct macroscopic self-healing scaffolds. The core-shell microbeads remain in an "inert" state owing to the isolation of a pair of complementary polymers in a form that can be stored as an aqueous suspension. An annealing process after injection effectively induces the re-construction of the microbead units, leading to supramolecular gelation in a preconfigured shape. The resulting macroscopic scaffold is dynamically stable, displaying self-recovery in a self-healing electronic conductor. This strategy of using the supramolecular assembled nested microbeads as building blocks represents an alternative to injectable hydrogel systems, and shows promise in the field of structural biomaterials and flexible electronics.
    Matched MeSH terms: Biocompatible Materials
  16. Isa, Z.M., Hobkirk, J.A.
    Ann Dent, 2000;7(1):-.
    MyJurnal
    Currently many dental implant systems with varied and numerous components are available commercially, and with new implant systems and designs emerging, it is essential that the user understands that any system selected should be based on sound scientific principles and capable of osseoil!tegration. This has been defined in many different ways, with biomaterial, biological and biomechanical factors being the main considerations. The final restoration is based on both biological tissue and mechanical components. As the success of osseointegration is based on the clinical outcome, clinicians must ensure that the stresses that the superstructure, implant, and surrounding bone are subjected to are within the tolerable limits of the various components, even though the degree of tolerance has not yet been fully defined.
    Matched MeSH terms: Biocompatible Materials
  17. Ling BC
    PMID: 11709981
    Standard prosthodontic procedures require five visits to construct a set of complete maxillary and mandibular dentures. Various attempts have been made to reduce these procedures to four or three appointments. However, most of these techniques require the use of visible light polymerized resin as the final denture base materials. Visible light-cured resin materials have inferior physical properties and biocompatibility problems as compared with heat cured polymethylmethacrylate. This paper describes a system of complete denture construction which requires three clinical appointments instead of the usual five visits. This system is made possible by using the VLC base/tray material as the preliminary impression material as well as the application of a new biometric wax occlusion rim. It retains the use of polymethylmethacrylate as the denture base material. This system also utilizes all the procedures used in the conventional five appointment system of complete denture construction.
    Matched MeSH terms: Biocompatible Materials/chemistry
  18. Parham S, Kharazi AZ, Bakhsheshi-Rad HR, Nur H, Ismail AF, Sharif S, et al.
    Antioxidants (Basel), 2020 Dec 21;9(12).
    PMID: 33371338 DOI: 10.3390/antiox9121309
    Recently, increasing public concern about hygiene has been driving many studies to investigate antimicrobial and antiviral agents. However, the use of any antimicrobial agents must be limited due to their possible toxic or harmful effects. In recent years, due to previous antibiotics' lesser side effects, the use of herbal materials instead of synthetic or chemical drugs is increasing. Herbal materials are found in medicines. Herbs can be used in the form of plant extracts or as their active components. Furthermore, most of the world's populations used herbal materials due to their strong antimicrobial properties and primary healthcare benefits. For example, herbs are an excellent material to replace nanosilver as an antibiotic and antiviral agent. The use of nanosilver involves an ROS-mediated mechanism that might lead to oxidative stress-related cancer, cytotoxicity, and heart diseases. Oxidative stress further leads to increased ROS production and also delays the cellular processes involved in wound healing. Therefore, existing antibiotic drugs can be replaced with biomaterials such as herbal medicine with high antimicrobial, antiviral, and antioxidant activity. This review paper highlights the antibacterial, antiviral, and radical scavenger (antioxidant) properties of herbal materials. Antimicrobial activity, radical scavenger ability, the potential for antimicrobial, antiviral, and anticancer agents, and efficacy in eliminating bacteria and viruses and scavenging free radicals in herbal materials are discussed in this review. The presented herbal antimicrobial agents in this review include clove, portulaca, tribulus, eryngium, cinnamon, turmeric, ginger, thyme, pennyroyal, mint, fennel, chamomile, burdock, eucalyptus, primrose, lemon balm, mallow, and garlic, which are all summarized.
    Matched MeSH terms: Biocompatible Materials
  19. Kouhi M, Jayarama Reddy V, Ramakrishna S
    Appl Biochem Biotechnol, 2019 Jun;188(2):357-368.
    PMID: 30456599 DOI: 10.1007/s12010-018-2922-0
    Bioceramic nanoparticles with high specific surface area often tend to agglomerate in the polymer matrix, which results in undesirable mechanical properties of the composites and poor cell spreading and attachment. In the present work, bredigite (BR) nanoparticles were modified with an organosilane coupling agent, 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS), to enhance its dispersibility in the polymer matrix. The polyhydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvaletare (PHBV) nanofibrous scaffolds containing either bredigite or GPTMS-modified bredigite (G-BR) nanoparticles were fabricated using electrospinning technique and characterized using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and tensile strength. Results demonstrated that modification of bredigite was effective in enhancing nanoparticle dispersion in the PHBV matrix. PHBV/G-BR scaffold showed improved mechanical properties compared to PHBV and PHBV/BR, especially at the higher concentration of nanoparticles. In vitro bioactivity assay performed in the simulated body fluid (SBF) indicated that composite PHBV scaffolds were able to induce the formation of apatite deposits after incubation in SBF. From the results of in vitro biological assay, it is concluded that the synergetic effect of BR and GPTMS provided an enhanced hFob cells attachment and proliferation. The developed PHBV/G-BR nanofibrous scaffolds may be considered for application in bone tissue engineering.
    Matched MeSH terms: Biocompatible Materials/chemistry
  20. Chan SK, Lim TS
    Appl Microbiol Biotechnol, 2019 Apr;103(7):2973-2984.
    PMID: 30805670 DOI: 10.1007/s00253-019-09669-3
    Microbial transglutaminase (mTGase) is commonly known in the food industry as meat glue due to its incredible ability to "glue" meat proteins together. Aside from being widely exploited in the meat processing industries, mTGase is also widely applied in other food and textile industries by catalysing the formation of isopeptide bonds between peptides or protein substrates. The advancement of technology has opened up new avenues for mTGase in the field of biomedical engineering. Efforts have been made to study the structural properties of mTGase in order to gain an in-depth understanding of the structure-function relationship. This review highlights the developments in mTGase engineering together with its role in biomedical applications including biomaterial fabrication for tissue engineering and biotherapeutics.
    Matched MeSH terms: Biocompatible Materials
Filters
Contact Us

Please provide feedback to Administrator (tengcl@gmail.com)

External Links