Displaying publications 41 - 49 of 49 in total

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  1. Yadav H, Lin WY
    Asia Pac J Public Health, 2001;13 Suppl:S36-8.
    PMID: 12109246
    Telemedicine is fast becoming popular in many countries in the world. It has several advantages such as being cost saving and providing better access to health care in the remote areas in many parts of the world. However, it has some disadvantages as well. One of the major problems is the problem of patients' rights and confidentiality in the use of telemedicine. There are no standard guidelines and procedures in the practice of telemedicine as yet. Both the patient and the physician are unsure of the standard of practice and how to maintain confidentiality. The patient is uncertain as to how to protect her/his rights in the use of telemedicine. The issue of litigation is also unclear as to where the physician is practicing when he/she uses telemedicine. Is she/he practicing in the country where the patient is or is the physician practicing in the country of her/his origin? These issues need to be addressed urgently so that telemedicine will have standards of ethical practice and the patient's rights and confidentiality will be protected.
    Matched MeSH terms: Ethics, Medical*
  2. Hosken FP
    Int J Health Serv, 1981;11(3):415-30.
    PMID: 7298255
    Extensive research and field work have established that more than 74 million women and female children are mutilated by female genital operations in Africa alone. The operations are also practiced in many parts of the Middle East and, with Moslemization, were introduced into Indonesia and Malaysia where they are preformed at the present time in a less damaging form. This paper lists the countries where instances of excision and infibulation have been reported and includes case reports from Sudan, Egypt, Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, Nigeria, Mali, Upper Volta, and Senegal. The ethical issues posed by genital mutilation are also discussed.
    Matched MeSH terms: Ethics, Medical*
  3. Ong BB, Kaur S
    Malays J Pathol, 1997 Dec;19(2):111-4.
    PMID: 10879250
    The duty of confidentiality in the normal doctor-patient relationship is well recognized. However, the duty of confidentiality between the pathologist who performs the autopsy and the requesting authorities and the next-of-kin is not as clearly spelt out. This article discusses the problems faced by the pathologist with regards to hospital and medico-legal autopsies in Malaysia. A proposed ethical guideline is included on how to deal with peculiar issues regarding confidentiality and the pathologist.
    Matched MeSH terms: Ethics, Medical
  4. Santibañez S, Boudreaux D, Tseng GF, Konkel K
    J Relig Health, 2016 Oct;55(5):1483-94.
    PMID: 26311054 DOI: 10.1007/s10943-015-0110-x
    The Buddhist Tzu Chi Silent Mentor Program promotes the donation of one's body to science as a selfless act by appealing to the Buddhist ethics of compassion and self-sacrifice. Together, faculty, families, and donors help medical students to learn the technical, spiritual, emotional, and psychological aspects of medicine. Students assigned to each "Silent Mentor" visit the family to learn about the donor's life. They see photos and hear family members' stories. Afterwards, students write a brief biography of the donor which is posted on the program website, in the medical school, and on the dissection table. In this paper, we: (1) summarize the Silent Mentor Program; (2) describe findings from an assessment of medical students who recently completed a new version of the program in Malaysia; and (3) explore how healthcare settings could benefit from this innovative program.
    Matched MeSH terms: Ethics, Medical/education
  5. Mazlina M, Julia PE
    Singapore Med J, 2011 Jun;52(6):421-7.
    PMID: 21731994
    Medical ethics issues encountered in rehabilitation medicine differ from those in an acute care setting due to the complex relationships among the parties involved in rehabilitative care. The study examined the attitudes of Malaysian rehabilitation doctors toward medical ethics issues commonly encountered during patient care.
    Matched MeSH terms: Ethics, Medical*
  6. Miyasaka M, Akabayashi A, Kai I, Ohi G
    J Med Ethics, 1999 Dec;25(6):514-21.
    PMID: 10635508
    SETTING: Medical ethics education has become common, and the integrated ethics curriculum has been recommended in Western countries. It should be questioned whether there is one, universal method of teaching ethics applicable worldwide to medical schools, especially those in non-Western developing countries.
    OBJECTIVE: To characterise the medical ethics curricula at Asian medical schools.
    DESIGN: Mailed survey of 206 medical schools in China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Korea, Mongolia, Philippines, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Australia and New Zealand.
    PARTICIPANTS: A total of 100 medical schools responded, a response rate of 49%, ranging from 23%-100% by country.
    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The degree of integration of the ethics programme into the formal medical curriculum was measured by lecture time; whether compulsory or elective; whether separate courses or unit of other courses; number of courses; schedule; total length, and diversity of teachers' specialties.
    RESULTS: A total of 89 medical schools (89%) reported offering some courses in which ethical topics were taught. Separate medical ethics courses were mostly offered in all countries, and the structure of vertical integration was divided into four patterns. Most deans reported that physicians' obligations and patients' rights were the most important topics for their students. However, the evaluation was diverse for more concrete topics.
    CONCLUSION: Offering formal medical ethics education is a widespread feature of medical curricula throughout the study area. However, the kinds of programmes, especially with regard to integration into clinical teaching, were greatly diverse.
    Matched MeSH terms: Ethics, Medical*
  7. Hamer JW
    Malays J Pathol, 1997 Dec;19(2):99-103.
    PMID: 10879248
    Matched MeSH terms: Ethics, Medical
  8. Phua J, Joynt GM, Nishimura M, Deng Y, Myatra SN, Chan YH, et al.
    JAMA Intern Med, 2015 Mar;175(3):363-71.
    PMID: 25581712 DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2014.7386
    Little data exist on end-of-life care practices in intensive care units (ICUs) in Asia.
    Matched MeSH terms: Ethics, Medical
  9. Chamsi-Pasha H, Albar MA
    Med. J. Malaysia, 2017 10;72(5):278-281.
    PMID: 29197882
    INTRODUCTION: The ever-increasing technological advances of Western medicine have created new ethical issues awaiting answers and response. The use of genetic therapy, organ transplant, milk-banking, end-of-life care and euthanasia are of paramount importance to the medical students and need to be addressed.

    METHODS: A series of searches were conducted of Medline databases published in English between January 2000 and January 2017 with the following keywords: medical ethics, syllabus, Islam, jurisprudence.

    RESULTS: Islamic medical jurisprudence is gaining more attention in some medical schools. However, there is still lack of an organised syllabus in many medical colleges.

    CONCLUSION: The outlines of a syllabus in Islamic medical jurisprudence including Islamic values and moral principles related to both the practice and research of medicine are explored.

    Matched MeSH terms: Ethics, Medical
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