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  1. Narimah, A.H.H., Shahril Rizwan, O., N Nadhrah, N.R., Adlina, S., Hakimi, Z.A., Nuraliza, A.S.
    MyJurnal
    This descriptive cross sectional study was conducted to assess patient's satisfaction by evaluating the waiting time experienced by 27 (54%) inpatients and 23 (46%) outpatients who sought treatment at a private hospital in Selangor from 15th of May 2006 until 3rd of]une 2006. Majority of the patients (78%) were in the range between Z 1 - 40 years old and well»educated. Almost half (48%) were in the human resources employment category, 20% were in administration and marketing and 10% were professionals. Majority of them earned from RM1000-1999 (34%) and RMZ000-3999 (32%). Almost all of them (96%) agreed that the medical care that they had been receiving in the hospital was just about perfect. 98% agreed that the doctors treated them in a very friendly and courteous manner and 96% rated the care given by nurses as g0od/ excellent. 88% to 92% said that their communication with the doctors, nurses and other staff were good/ excellent. 80% waited less than 15 minutes at the registration counter, 52% waited less than 15 minutes to see the doctor and 44% waited less than 15 minutes at other places such as pharmacy and x-ray. Overall, 94% rated the level of services in the hospital as good/ excellent, Almost all (90%) would like to recommend the hospital to their friends and relatives. Our study demonstrated that the majority of the patients were satisfied with the doctors, nurses and environment of the private hospital. The average waiting time of patient before being attended to by a doctor was less than 30 minutes.

    Study site: Pusat Perubatan Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (PPUKM)
  2. Adlina, S., Narimah, A.H.H., Hakimi, Z.A., N Adilah, H., N Syuhada, Y.
    MyJurnal
    Employee satnfaction surveys can provide the information needed to improved levek of productivity, job and loyalty. Management can identify the factors of job issues and provide solutions to improve the working environment. A cross sectional descriptive study on employee satisfaction among a health care district office’s staff was conducted in Perak in March - April 2006. A total of 19 staff were randomly picked and interviewed in the data collection process. Almost all understand the objectives of the administration unit (94%) and were satisfied with the management leadership’s style (78%- l 00%) . Majority agreed that their relationship with immediate superior and within the group was harmonious and professional (89%) and they preferred an open problem solving method in handling conflict (72 %). The most common type of incentive rewarded by the administration to express gratitude to their staff was certificate (56%); bonus and medal (33%); and informal gesture (28%). Majority (83%) were also satisfied by the method used to disseminate the information in their units. Majority agreed that the working environment in the administration unit were conducive (72%), their ideas were equally considered during decision making sessions (89%) and training opportunities were similarly given to them by the management (72%). This study revealed that employee satisfaction was determined by several factors such as management leadership's style, opportunity to contribute skills and idea; reward and incentive; and conducive king environment.
  3. Narimah, A.H.H., Adlina, S., Ambigga Devi, S.K., Mazlin, M.M., Hakimi, Z.A., Nuraliza, A.S.
    MyJurnal
    A cross sectional study to determine general health and body composition was conducted for comparison between rural samples (Teluk Intan, Perak) and urban samples (Klang Valley, Selangor). Systematic random sampling was used in Z health clinics in Klang Valky and 4 health clinics in Telult Intan, Perak The results showed that urban population was more heterogeneous (Malay 63.7%, Indian 19.8%, Chinese 14.9%) compared with the rural population (Malay 75%, Indian 22.1%, Chinese 2.9%). Mean age for urban population was 44 2 1.6 years and for rural was 50 i 14.4 years. There was significant difference in the BMI (p < 0.05) between urban and rural populations where more people in the urban areas had higher BMI. There was a significant difference in the waist hip ratio (p < 0.05) between urban and rural areas where more people in the urban areas had above normal waist hip ratio. There was no significant difference in chronic diseases suffered and family medical history of the rural and urban samples.
  4. Adlina, S., Narimah, A.H.H., Mazlin, M.M., Nuraliza, A.S., Hakimi, Z.A., Soe, S.A., et al.
    MyJurnal
    This study was conducted to determine the patterns of disease and treatment at two disaster sites. Studies prior to this have shown that all natural disasters are unique in that each affected region of the world have different social, economic and health backgrounds. However, similarities exist among the health effects of different disasters which if recognized can ensure that health and emergency medical relief and limited resources are well managed. This study found that although Aceh and Balakot were two totally different areas with reference to locality and climate it was noticed that the patterns of disease two months post disaster are similar the commonest being respiratory conditions followed by musculoskeletal conditions and gastrointestinal conditions. For the treatment patterns it was observed that the two areas prescribed almost similar, types of medicine mainly for gastrointestinal and respiratory systems. However in Aceh, there were more skin treatment and in Balakot there was more usage of musculoskeletal drugs.
  5. Adlina, S., Narimah, A.H.H., Hakimi, Z.A., Suthahar, A., M Nor Hisyam, R., Ruhaida, M.K., et al.
    MyJurnal
    Stress has been recognized one of the factors causing disease. About 70-80% of all diseases may be stress related. Thus, stress management can be a part of an early measure of disease prevention. A descriptive cross sectional, randomized study was conducted to determine the stress inducing factors among preclinical students (universal sampling) in a public university in Selangor, Malaysia from 24th April to May 2005. A total of 163 students (52.8% year 1, 36.8% year 2 and 10.4% year 3) were interviewed in the data collection process. The main reasons students entered - medical school was because of their own interest or ambition (65%) and family influence (20.9%). Majority (76.4%) suffered moderate to great stress over hot conditions in lecture hall, tutoriaV small group session rooms and laboratories while 53.4% suffered when using the other facilities like cafeteria, toilet and transportation:. Almost all (95.1%) felt that examination was the most stressful, followed by early clinical exposure sessions (68.1%), problem·based learning sessions (62.5%), hospital visitations (59.7%), tutoriay small group sessions (49.3%), practical class (44.5%) and attending lectures (3 8.5%). Musculoskeletal System was the most stressful module among the first year students, followed by Nervous System and Gastrointestinal System with the percentage of 94.2%, 90.7% and 88.4% respectively while, 95% of the second year students felt that General, Hemopoietic ci? Lymphoid and Nervous System are the most stressful modules. This study revealed that academic sessions and lack of conducive teaching and learning environment as the main stress inducing contributors to preclinical medical students.
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