Displaying publications 1 - 20 of 28 in total

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  1. Mohamad AS, Rejab E, Said H
    Med. J. Malaysia, 1989 Jun;44(2):174-7.
    PMID: 2626128
    A case of carotid body tumour is presented. Pathology, diagnostic investigations, modalities of treatment and prognosis are discussed. With greater awareness of this condition and improvement in diagnostic investigations and surgical techniques, the outlook in managing this condition should be better.
  2. Saim L, Mohamad AS, Ambu VK
    Int. J. Pediatr. Otorhinolaryngol., 1994 Jan;28(2-3):241-6.
    PMID: 8157425
    Congenital lobar emphysema has been described under various designations. Although the etiology is not clear, some form of bronchial obstruction has been documented in about 50% of the patients. A rare case of congenital lobar emphysema with a membranous septum in the left main bronchus is described. Although prompt lobectomy has been the treatment of choice in most cases, this case demonstrates the importance of early bronchoscopy to exclude treatable intra luminal abnormalities.
  3. Zakaria ZA, Patahuddin H, Mohamad AS, Israf DA, Sulaiman MR
    J Ethnopharmacol, 2010 Mar 2;128(1):42-8.
    PMID: 20035852 DOI: 10.1016/j.jep.2009.12.021
    Piper sarmentosum (Piperaceae) is a medicinal plant traditionally used by the Malays to treat headaches, toothaches, coughs, asthma and fever.
  4. Mohamad AS, Hamzah R, Selvaratnam V, Yegapan S, Sathar J
    Hematol Rep, 2018 Sep 05;10(3):7210.
    PMID: 30344984 DOI: 10.4081/hr.2018.7210
    Human hemoglobin of G-Makassar variant has been reported very rarely with Beta Thalassemia. In year 1969 Hb GMakassar was first identified in Makassar, Sulawesi (Celebes), Republic of Indonesia. The disease was first published in 1969 and 33 years later it has been reported at a family of Thailand origin. We report a 45-yearold Malay man who was investigated for anemia and thrombocytopenia then diagnosed with Hb G-Makassar. This finding describes as a new Hemoglobin GMakassar discovered in Malaysia after 14 years diagnosed in Thailand.
  5. Zakaria ZA, Hussain MK, Mohamad AS, Abdullah FC, Sulaiman MR
    Biol Res Nurs, 2012 Jan;14(1):90-7.
    PMID: 21278166 DOI: 10.1177/1099800410395378
    Ficus deltoidea (Family Moraceae) leaves have been used traditionally by the Malays to treat ailments such as wounds, sores, and rheumatism. The aim of the present study was to determine the anti-inflammatory activity of the aqueous extract of F. deltoidea leaf (FDA) using acute and chronic inflammatory models. FDA, in the doses of 30, 100, and 300 mg/kg, was administered intraperitoneally in rats (n = 6) before the animals were subjected to the carrageenan-induced paw edema test, cotton pellet-induced granuloma test, and formalin test. The first two tests represent acute and chronic models of inflammation, respectively. The first and second phases of the formalin test represent neurogenic pain and inflammatory-mediated pain, respectively; thus, only the second phase was measured in the present study. Results showed that FDA exerted significant (p < .05) anti-inflammatory activity in all assays, with dose-response effects seen in the paw edema and formalin tests. In conclusion, the leaf of F. deltoidea possesses anti-inflammatory activity against acute and chronic inflammatory responses and against pain-associated inflammatory response. These findings justify the traditional uses of F. deltoidea leaves for treatment of inflammatory-mediated ailments.
  6. Zakaria ZA, Mohamad AS, Ahmad MS, Mokhtar AF, Israf DA, Lajis NH, et al.
    Biol Res Nurs, 2011 Oct;13(4):425-32.
    PMID: 21112917 DOI: 10.1177/1099800410386590
    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been widely used for the treatment of inflammation. However, despite their effectiveness, most NSAIDs cause various side effects that negatively affect the management of inflammation and, in part, pain. Thus, there is a need to search for new anti-inflammatory agents with few, or no, side effects. Natural products of plant, animal, or microorganism origin have been good sources of new bioactive compounds. The present study was carried out to evaluate the acute and chronic anti-inflammatory activities of the essential oil of the rhizomes of Zingiber zerumbet (Zingiberaceae) using the carrageenan-induced paw edema and cotton pellet-induced granuloma tests, respectively. The effect of the essential oil on inflammatory- and noninflammatory-mediated pain was also assessed using the formalin test. Essential oil of Z. zerumbet, at doses of 30, 100, and 300 mg/kg, was administered intraperitoneally to rats. The substance exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity both in acute and chronic animal models. The essential oil also inhibited inflammatory- and noninflammatory-mediated pain when assessed using the formalin test. In conclusion, the essential oil of Z. zerumbet possessed anti-inflammatory activity, in addition to its antinociceptive activity, which may explain its traditional uses to treat inflammatory-related ailments.
  7. Sulaiman MR, Zakaria ZA, Mohamad AS, Ismail M, Hidayat MT, Israf DA, et al.
    Pharm Biol, 2010 Aug;48(8):861-8.
    PMID: 20673172 DOI: 10.3109/13880200903302820
    Alpinia conchigera Griff. (Zingiberaceae), locally known to the Malays as "lengkuas ranting", is native to Peninsular Malaysia. The Malays traditionally used it to treat infection and rashes, and as a health drink. This study evaluated the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of the ethanol extract of A. conchigera rhizomes in mice and rats, respectively. The analgesic activity was elucidated using the acetic acid-induced writhing test, hot plate test, and formalin test, while the anti-inflammatory activity was determined using carrageenan-induced paw edema. The extract (30, 100, and 300 mg/kg) given intraperitoneally (i.p.) exhibited antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities in all tests used. The range of percentage of analgesia obtained for all doses of extract in the writhing test was 50-92%, and in the early and late phases of the formalin test was 25-62% and 63-98%, respectively. In addition, naloxone (5 mg/kg) given subcutaneously (s.c.) was found to reverse the extract (300 mg/kg)-induced antinociceptive activity in the writhing, hot plate, and formalin tests. Based on the results obtained, it can be concluded that the ethanol extract of A. conchigera rhizomes possessed a peripheral and central antinociceptive activity that was mediated, in part, via the opioid receptor, as well as anti-inflammatory activity.
  8. Zakaria ZA, Mohamad AS, Chear CT, Wong YY, Israf DA, Sulaiman MR
    Med Princ Pract, 2010;19(4):287-94.
    PMID: 20516705 DOI: 10.1159/000312715
    The present study was carried out to determine the antiinflammatory and antinociceptive activities of a methanol extract of Zingiber zerumbet rhizomes (MEZZ) using various experimental model systems.
  9. Al-Yahya SN, Baki MM, Saad SM, Azman M, Mohamad AS
    Ann Saudi Med, 2016 8 2;36(4):292-7.
    PMID: 27478916 DOI: 10.5144/0256-4947.2016.292
    A systematic review on laryngopyoceles across Ovid, PubMed, and Google Scholar database was conducted. A total of 61 papers published between 1952 and 2015 were found. Of these, 23 cases written in English, which described the number of cases, surgical approaches, resort to tracheostomy, complications, and outcomes, were shortlisted. Four cases of laryngopyoceles were managed endoscopically using a cold instrument, microdebrider, or laser. Eighteen cases were operated via an external approach, and 1 case applied both approaches. One of 4 endoscopic and 10 of 18 external approaches involved tracheostomy. The present study aimed to report a case of large mixed laryngopyocele that was successfully drained and marsupialized endoscopically using suction diathermy without requiring tracheostomy. Management using suction diathermy for excision and marsupialization of a laryngopyocele has never been reported and can be recommended as a feasible method due to its widespread availability. In the presence of a large laryngopyocele impeding the airway, tracheostomy may be averted in a controlled setting.

    SIMILAR CASES PUBLISHED: None specified.

  10. Israf DA, Tham CL, Syahida A, Lajis NH, Sulaiman MR, Mohamad AS, et al.
    Phytomedicine, 2010 Aug;17(10):732-9.
    PMID: 20378317 DOI: 10.1016/j.phymed.2010.02.006
    In a previous communication we showed that atrovirinone, a 1,4-benzoquinone isolated from the roots of Garcinia atroviridis, was able to inhibit several major proinflammatory mediators of inflammation. In this report we show that atrovirinone inhibits NO and PGE(2) synthesis through inhibition of iNOS and COX-2 expression. We also show that atrovirinone inhibits the secretion of IL-1beta and IL-6 in a dose dependent fashion whereas the secretion of IL-10, the anti-inflammatory cytokine, was enhanced. Subsequently we determined that the inhibition of proinflammatory cytokine synthesis and inducible enzyme expression was due to a dose-dependent inhibition of phosphorylation of p38 and ERK1/2. We also showed that atrovirinone prevented phosphorylation of I-kappaBalpha, which resulted in a reduction of p65NF-kappaB nuclear translocation as demonstrated by expression analysis. We conclude that atrovirinone is a potential anti-inflammatory drug lead that targets both the MAPK and NF-kappaB pathway.
  11. Chia JSM, Omar Farouk AA, Mohamad AS, Sulaiman MR, Perimal EK
    Biomed. Pharmacother., 2016 Oct;83:1303-1310.
    PMID: 27570173 DOI: 10.1016/j.biopha.2016.08.052
    Zerumbone, a bioactive sesquiterpene isolated from Zingiber zerumbet (Smith), has shown to exert antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects in neuropathic pain mice model in our recent study. The mechanism through which zerumbone alleviates neuropathic pain has yet to be elucidated. Thus, this study aimed to determine whether the serotonergic system, part of the descending pain modulation pathway, contributes to the antineuropathic effect of zerumbone. Participation of the serotonergic system in zerumbone-induced antiallodynia and antihyperalgesia was assessed using Dynamic Plantar Aesthesiometer von Frey test and Hargreaves plantar test respectively in chronic-constriction injury mice model. Administration of ρ-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA, 100mg/kg, i.p.) for four consecutive days to deplete serotonin (5-HT) prior to zerumbone administration blocked the antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects of zerumbone. Further investigation with 5-HT receptor antagonists methiothepin (5-HT1/6/7 receptor antagonist, 0.1mg/kg), WAY-100635 (5-HT1A receptor antagonist, 1mg/kg), isamoltane (5-HT1B receptor antagonist, 2.5mg/kg), ketanserin (5-HT2A receptor antagonist, 0.3mg/kg) and ondansetron (5-HT3 receptor antagonist, 0.5mg/kg) managed to significantly attenuate antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects of zerumbone (10mg/kg). These findings demonstrate that zerumbone alleviates mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia through the descending serotonergic system via 5-HT receptors 1A, 1B, 2A, 3, 6 and 7 in chronic constriction injury neuropathic pain mice.
  12. Sulaiman MR, Zakaria ZA, Abdul Rahman A, Mohamad AS, Desa MN, Stanslas J, et al.
    Biol Res Nurs, 2010 Jan;11(3):293-301.
    PMID: 19689990 DOI: 10.1177/1099800409343311
    The current study was performed to evaluate the antinociceptive and antiedematogenic properties of andrographolide isolated from the leaves of Andrographis paniculata using two animal models. Antinociceptive activity was evaluated using the acetic acid- induced writhing and the hot-plate tests, while antiedematogenic activity was measured using the carrageenan-induced paw edema test. Subcutaneous (s.c.) administration of andrographolide (10, 25, and 50 mg/kg) did not affect the motor coordination of the experimental animals but produced significant (p < .05) antinociceptive activity when assessed using both tests. However, 2 mg/kg naloxone failed to affect the 25 mg/kg andrographolide activity in both tests, indicating that the activity was modulated via nonopioid mechanisms. Furthermore, andrographolide showed significant (p < .05) antiedematogenic activity. In conclusion, the results obtained suggest that andrographolide has antinociceptive and antiedematogenic activities; it may be useful for treating pain and inflammation once human studies are conducted.
  13. Sulaiman MR, Zakaria ZA, Adilius M, Mohamad AS, Ismail M, Israf DA
    Methods Find Exp Clin Pharmacol, 2009 May;31(4):241-7.
    PMID: 19557202 DOI: 10.1358/mf.2009.31.4.1371198
    The ethanolic extract of Alpinia conchigera Griff. leaves (EACL) was evaluated for its antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities in several in vivo experimental models. Antinociceptive activity was determined using the acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing test, the hot plate test and the formalin test. Anti-inflammatory activity was determined using the carrageenan-induced paw edema test. The extract (30, 100 and 300 mg/kg i.p.) was found to possess significant, dose-dependent inhibitory activity in all test models. In addition, the antinociceptive effect of the extract in the acetic acid-induced writhing and hot plate tests was reversed by naloxone, suggesting that this activity is mediated through activation of the opioid system. These findings suggest that EACL presents notable analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities, which support its folkloric use for painful and inflammatory conditions.
  14. Sulaiman MR, Hussain MK, Zakaria ZA, Somchit MN, Moin S, Mohamad AS, et al.
    Fitoterapia, 2008 Dec;79(7-8):557-61.
    PMID: 18672036 DOI: 10.1016/j.fitote.2008.06.005
    The aqueous extract of Ficus deltoidea leaves was evaluated for possible antinociceptive activity in three models of nociception, namely, acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing, formalin and hot plate test. The results of the present study showed that intraperitoneal administration of the F. deltoidea leaves aqueous extract at the dose of 1, 50 and 100 mg/kg, 30 min prior to pain induction produced significant dose-dependent antinociceptive effect in all the models used, which indicating the presence of both central and peripherally mediated activities. Furthermore, the antinociceptive effect of the extract in the formalin and hot plate test was reversed by the non-selective opioid receptor antagonist naloxone suggesting that the endogenous opioid system is involved in its analgesic mechanism of action. Thus, the present results demonstrated that F. deltoidea leaves aqueous extract contains pharmacologically active constituents which possess antinociceptive activity justifying its popular therapeutic use in treating conditions associated with the painful conditions.
  15. Kamaldin MN, Akhtar MN, Mohamad AS, Lajis N, Perimal EK, Akira A, et al.
    Molecules, 2013 Apr 10;18(4):4209-20.
    PMID: 23612473 DOI: 10.3390/molecules18044209
    Previous studies have shown that systemic administration of 6'-hydroxy-2',4'-dimethoxychalcone (flavokawin B, FKB) exerts significant peripheral and central antinociceptive effects in laboratory animals. However, the mechanisms underlying these peripheral and central antinociceptive effects have yet to be elucidated. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the participation of nitric oxide (NO)/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)/potassium (K+) channels pathway in the peripheral antinociception induced by FKB. It was demonstrated that intraplantar (i.pl.) administration of FKB (150, 250, 375 and 500 µg/paw) resulted in dose-dependent peripheral antinociception against mechanical hyperalgesia in carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia test model in rats. The possibility of FKB having either a central or a systemic effect was excluded since administration of FKB into the right paw did not elicit antinociception in the contralateral paw. Furthermore, peripheral antinociception induced by FKB (500 µg/paw) was significantly reduced when L-arginine (25 µg/paw, i.pl.), Oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ; 50 µg/paw, i.pl.), glibenclamide (300 µg/paw, i.pl.), tetraethylammonium (300 µg/paw, i.pl.) and charybdotoxin (3 µg/paw, i.pl.) were injected before treatment. Taken together, our present data suggest that FKB elicits peripheral antinociception when assessed in the mechanical hyperalgesia induced by carrageenan. In addition, it was also demonstrated that this effect was mediated through interaction of the NO/cGMP/K+ channels signaling pathway.
  16. Sulaiman MR, Mohd Padzil A, Shaari K, Khalid S, Shaik Mossadeq WM, Mohamad AS, et al.
    J. Biomed. Biotechnol., 2010;2010:937642.
    PMID: 21274262 DOI: 10.1155/2010/937642
    Melicope ptelefolia is a medicinal herb commonly used in Malaysia to treat fever, pain, wounds, and itches. The present study was conducted to evaluate the antinociceptive activity of the Melicope ptelefolia ethanolic extract (MPEE) using animal models of nociception. The antinociceptive activity of the extract was assessed using acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing, hot-plate, and formalin-induced paw licking tests. Oral administration of MPEE produced significant dose-dependent antinociceptive effects when tested in mice and rats using acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction test and on the second phase of the formalin-induced paw licking test, respectively. It was also demonstrated that MPEE had no effect on the response latency time to the heat stimulus in the thermal model of the hot-plate test. In addition, the antinociception produced by MPEE was not blocked by naloxone. Furthermore, oral administration of MPEE did not produce any effect in motor performance of the rota-rod test and in acute toxicity study no abnormal behaviors as well as mortality were observed up to a dose level of the extract of 5 g/kg. These results indicated that MPEE at all doses investigated which did not produce any sedative and toxic effects exerted pronounce antinociceptive activity that acts peripherally in experimental animals.
  17. Khalid MH, Akhtar MN, Mohamad AS, Perimal EK, Akira A, Israf DA, et al.
    J Ethnopharmacol, 2011 Sep 1;137(1):345-51.
    PMID: 21664960 DOI: 10.1016/j.jep.2011.05.043
    Zingiber zerumbet (L.) Smith, a wild edible ginger species or locally known as "lempoyang", commonly used in the Malays traditional medicine as an appetizer or to treat stomachache, toothache, muscle sprain and as a cure for swelling sores and cuts.
  18. Khalid S, Shaik Mossadeq WM, Israf DA, Hashim P, Rejab S, Shaberi AM, et al.
    Med Princ Pract, 2010;19(4):255-9.
    PMID: 20516700 DOI: 10.1159/000312710
    To study the effects of Tamarindus indica L. aqueous fruit extract on the antinociceptive activities in rodent models.
  19. Wai YZ, Fiona Chew LM, Mohamad AS, Ang CL, Chong YY, Adnan TH, et al.
    Int J Ophthalmol, 2018;11(10):1685-1690.
    PMID: 30364221 DOI: 10.18240/ijo.2018.10.17
    AIM: To report the incidence, risk factors and visual outcomes for postoperative endophthalmitis (POE) based on 7-year data from the Malaysian Ministry of Health Cataract Surgery Registry (MOH CSR).

    METHODS: Data was collected from the web-based MOH CSR. All consecutive cataract surgery patients from 1st June 2008 to 31st December 2014 were identified. Exclusion criteria were traumatic cataract or previous ocular surgery. Demographic data, ocular co-morbidities, intraoperative details and postoperative visual acuity (VA) at final ophthalmological follow-up were noted. All eyes were taken for analysis. Subjects with POE were compared against subjects with no POE for risk factor assessment using multiple logistic regressions.

    RESULTS: A total of 163 503 subjects were screened. The incidence of POE was 0.08% (131/163 503). Demographic POE risk factors included male gender (OR: 2.121, 95%CI: 1.464-3.015) and renal disease (OR: 2.867, 95%CI: 1.503-5.467). POE risk increased with secondary causes of cataract (OR: 3.562, 95%CI: 1.740-7.288), uveitis (OR: 11.663, 95%CI: 4.292-31.693) and diabetic retinopathy (OR: 1.720, 95%CI: 1.078-2.744). Intraoperative factors reducing POE were shorter surgical time (OR: 2.114, 95%CI: 1.473-3.032), topical or intracameral anaesthesia (OR: 1.823, 95%CI: 1.278-2.602), posterior chamber intraocular lens (PCIOL; OR: 4.992, 95%CI: 2.689-9.266) and foldable IOL (OR: 2.276, 95%CI: 1.498-3.457). POE risk increased with posterior capsule rupture (OR: 3.773, 95%CI: 1.915-7.432) and vitreous loss (OR: 3.907, 95%CI: 1.720-8.873). Postoperative VA of 6/12 or better was achieved in 15.27% (20/131) subjects with POE.

    CONCLUSION: This study concurs with other studies regarding POE risk factors. Further strengthening of MOH CSR data collection process will enable deeper analysis and optimization of POE treatment.

  20. Ming-Tatt L, Khalivulla SI, Akhtar MN, Mohamad AS, Perimal EK, Khalid MH, et al.
    Basic Clin. Pharmacol. Toxicol., 2012 Mar;110(3):275-82.
    PMID: 21967232 DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-7843.2011.00804.x
    This study investigated the potential antinociceptive efficacy of a novel synthetic curcuminoid analogue, 2,6-bis-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylidene)cyclohexanone (BHMC), using chemical- and thermal-induced nociception test models in mice. BHMC (0.03, 0.1, 0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg) administered via intraperitoneal route (i.p.) produced significant dose-related inhibition in the acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction test in mice with an ID(50) of 0.15 (0.13-0.18) mg/kg. It was also demonstrated that BHMC produced significant inhibition in both neurogenic (first phase) and inflammatory phases (second phase) of the formalin-induced paw licking test with an ID(50) of 0.35 (0.27-0.46) mg/kg and 0.07 (0.06-0.08) mg/kg, respectively. Similarly, BHMC also exerted significant increase in the response latency period in the hot-plate test. Moreover, the antinociceptive effect of the BHMC in the formalin-induced paw licking test and the hot-plate test was antagonized by pre-treatment with the non-selective opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone. Together, these results indicate that the compound acts both centrally and peripherally. In addition, administration of BHMC exhibited significant inhibition of the neurogenic nociception induced by intraplantar injections of glutamate and capsaicin with ID(50) of 0.66 (0.41-1.07) mg/kg and 0.42 (0.38-0.51) mg/kg, respectively. Finally, it was also shown that BHMC-induced antinociception was devoid of toxic effects and its antinociceptive effect was associated with neither muscle relaxant nor sedative action. In conclusion, BHMC at all doses investigated did not cause any toxic and sedative effects and produced pronounced central and peripheral antinociceptive activities. The central antinociceptive activity of BHMC was possibly mediated through activation of the opioid system as well as inhibition of the glutamatergic system and TRPV1 receptors, while the peripheral antinociceptive activity was perhaps mediated through inhibition of various inflammatory mediators.
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