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  1. Nhari RM, Ismail A, Che Man YB
    J Food Sci, 2012 Jan;77(1):R42-6.
    PMID: 22260124 DOI: 10.1111/j.1750-3841.2011.02514.x
    Usage of gelatin in food products has been widely debated for several years, which is about the source of gelatin that has been used, religion, and health. As an impact, various analytical methods have been introduced and developed to differentiate gelatin whether it is made from porcine or bovine sources. The analytical methods comprise a diverse range of equipment and techniques including spectroscopy, chemical precipitation, chromatography, and immunochemical. Each technique can differentiate gelatins for certain extent with advantages and limitations. This review is focused on overview of the analytical methods available for differentiation of bovine and porcine gelatin and gelatin in food products so that new method development can be established.
    Matched MeSH terms: Gelatin/metabolism
  2. Aziz HA, Tan YT, Peh KK
    AAPS PharmSciTech, 2012 Mar;13(1):35-45.
    PMID: 22101965 DOI: 10.1208/s12249-011-9707-x
    Microencapsulation of water-soluble drugs using coacervation-phase separation method is very challenging, as these drugs partitioned into the aqueous polymeric solution, resulting in poor drug entrapment. For evaluating the effect of ovalbumin on the microencapsulation of drugs with different solubility, pseudoephedrine HCl, verapamil HCl, propranolol HCl, paracetamol, and curcuminoid were used. In addition, drug mixtures comprising of paracetamol and pseudoephedrine HCl were also studied. The morphology, encapsulation efficiency, particle size, and in vitro release profile were investigated. The results showed that the solubility of the drug determined the ratio of ovalbumin to be used for successful microencapsulation. The optimum ratios of drug, ovalbumin, and gelatin for water-soluble (pseudoephedrine HCl, verapamil HCl, and propranolol HCl), sparingly water-soluble (paracetamol), and water-insoluble (curcuminoid) drugs were found to be 1:1:2, 2:3:5, and 1:3:4. As for the drug mixture, the optimum ratio of drug, ovalbumin, and gelatin was 2:3:5. Encapsulated particles prepared at the optimum ratios showed high yield, drug loading, entrapment efficiency, and sustained release profiles. The solubility of drug affected the particle size of the encapsulated particle. Highly soluble drugs resulted in smaller particle size. In conclusion, addition of ovalbumin circumvented the partitioning effect, leading to the successful microencapsulation of water-soluble drugs.
    Matched MeSH terms: Gelatin/metabolism
  3. Siar CH, Toh CG, Romanos G, Ng KH
    Clin Oral Implants Res, 2011 Jan;22(1):113-20.
    PMID: 20678135 DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0501.2010.01970.x
    collagenous and noncollagenous membranes have been investigated in many animal systems but their effects in the macaque model are unknown.
    Matched MeSH terms: Gelatin/metabolism
  4. Karami A, Karbalaei S, Zad Bagher F, Ismail A, Simpson SL, Courtenay SC
    Environ Pollut, 2016 Aug;215:170-177.
    PMID: 27182978 DOI: 10.1016/j.envpol.2016.05.014
    Skin is a major by-product of the fisheries and aquaculture industries and is a valuable source of gelatin. This study examined the effect of triploidization on gelatin yield and proximate composition of the skin of African catfish (Clarias gariepinus). We further investigated the effects of two commonly used pesticides, chlorpyrifos (CPF) and butachlor (BUC), on the skin gelatin yield and amino acid composition in juvenile full-sibling diploid and triploid African catfish. In two separate experiments, diploid and triploid C. gariepinus were exposed for 21 days to graded CPF [mean measured: 10, 16, or 31 μg/L] or BUC concentrations [Mean measured: 22, 44, or 60 μg/L]. No differences in skin gelatin yield, amino acid or proximate compositions were observed between diploid and triploid control groups. None of the pesticide treatments affected the measured parameters in diploid fish. In triploids, however, gelatin yield was affected by CPF treatments while amino acid composition remained unchanged. Butachlor treatments did not alter any of the measured variables in triploid fish. To our knowledge, this study is the first to investigate changes in the skin gelatin yield and amino acid composition in any animal as a response to polyploidization and/or contaminant exposure.
    Matched MeSH terms: Gelatin/metabolism*
  5. Chan SK, Lim TS
    Appl Microbiol Biotechnol, 2019 Apr;103(7):2973-2984.
    PMID: 30805670 DOI: 10.1007/s00253-019-09669-3
    Microbial transglutaminase (mTGase) is commonly known in the food industry as meat glue due to its incredible ability to "glue" meat proteins together. Aside from being widely exploited in the meat processing industries, mTGase is also widely applied in other food and textile industries by catalysing the formation of isopeptide bonds between peptides or protein substrates. The advancement of technology has opened up new avenues for mTGase in the field of biomedical engineering. Efforts have been made to study the structural properties of mTGase in order to gain an in-depth understanding of the structure-function relationship. This review highlights the developments in mTGase engineering together with its role in biomedical applications including biomaterial fabrication for tissue engineering and biotherapeutics.
    Matched MeSH terms: Gelatin/metabolism
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