Displaying publications 1 - 20 of 40 in total

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  1. Kumbargere Nagraj S, Prashanti E, Aggarwal H, Lingappa A, Muthu MS, Kiran Kumar Krishanappa S, et al.
    Cochrane Database Syst Rev, 2018 03 04;3:CD011930.
    PMID: 29502332 DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD011930.pub3
    BACKGROUND: Post-extraction bleeding (PEB) is a recognised, frequently encountered complication in dental practice, which is defined as bleeding that continues beyond 8 to 12 hours after dental extraction. The incidence of post-extraction bleeding varies from 0% to 26%. If post-extraction bleeding is not managed, complications can range from soft tissue haematomas to severe blood loss. Local causes of bleeding include soft tissue and bone bleeding. Systemic causes include platelet problems, coagulation disorders or excessive fibrinolysis, and inherited or acquired problems (medication induced). There is a wide array of techniques suggested for the treatment of post-extraction bleeding, which include interventions aimed at both local and systemic causes. This is an update of a review published in June 2016.

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of interventions for treating different types of post-extraction bleeding.

    SEARCH METHODS: Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 24 January 2018), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library, 2017, Issue 12), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 24 January 2018), Embase Ovid (1 May 2015 to 24 January 2018) and CINAHL EBSCO (1937 to 24 January 2018). The US National Institutes of Health Trials Registry (ClinicalTrials.gov) and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform were searched for ongoing trials. We searched the reference lists of relevant systematic reviews.

    SELECTION CRITERIA: We considered randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated any intervention for treating PEB, with male or female participants of any age, regardless of type of teeth (anterior or posterior, mandibular or maxillary). Trials could compare one type of intervention with another, with placebo, or with no treatment.

    DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Three pairs of review authors independently screened search records. We obtained full papers for potentially relevant trials. If data had been extracted, we would have followed the methods described in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions for the statistical analysis.

    MAIN RESULTS: We did not find any randomised controlled trial suitable for inclusion in this review.

    AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: We were unable to identify any reports of randomised controlled trials that evaluated the effects of different interventions for the treatment of post-extraction bleeding. In view of the lack of reliable evidence on this topic, clinicians must use their clinical experience to determine the most appropriate means of treating this condition, depending on patient-related factors. There is a need for well designed and appropriately conducted clinical trials on this topic, which conform to the CONSORT statement (www.consort-statement.org/).

    Matched MeSH terms: Oral Hemorrhage/therapy*; Postoperative Hemorrhage/therapy*
  2. Leow VM, Siam F, Kannan S, Sari Baharudin M, Raman K, Singh H
    Med J Malaysia, 2013 Jun;68(3):271-2.
    PMID: 23749023 MyJurnal
    A bleeding pseudoaneurysm of the peripancreatic artery can present with massive upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage. History of pancreatitis and urgent imaging are crucial in the making of the diagnosis. Here, we report a patient with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis presented with ruptured pseudoaneurysm of gastroduodenal artery (GDA). He was treated with percutaneous angiographic embolisation.
    Matched MeSH terms: Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage/therapy
  3. Kyaw K, Raj SM
    Med J Malaysia, 1993 Sep;48(3):377-8.
    PMID: 8183158
    Matched MeSH terms: Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage/therapy*
  4. Sumanth KN, Prashanti E, Aggarwal H, Kumar P, Lingappa A, Muthu MS, et al.
    PMID: 27285450 DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD011930.pub2
    BACKGROUND: Post-extraction bleeding (PEB) is a recognised, frequently encountered complication in dental practice, which is defined as bleeding that continues beyond 8 to 12 hours after dental extraction. The incidence of post-extraction bleeding varies from 0% to 26%. If post-extraction bleeding is not managed, complications can range from soft tissue haematomas to severe blood loss. Local causes of bleeding include soft tissue and bone bleeding. Systemic causes include platelet problems, coagulation disorders or excessive fibrinolysis, and inherited or acquired problems (medication induced). There is a wide array of techniques suggested for the treatment of post-extraction bleeding, which include interventions aimed at both local and systemic causes.

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of interventions for treating different types of post-extraction bleeding.

    SEARCH METHODS: We searched the following electronic databases: The Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register (to 22 March 2016); The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; The Cochrane Library 2016, Issue 2); MEDLINE via OVID (1946 to 22 March 2016); CINAHL via EBSCO (1937 to 22 March 2016). Due to the ongoing Cochrane project to search EMBASE and add retrieved clinical trials to CENTRAL, we searched only the last 11 months of EMBASE via OVID (1 May 2015 to 22 March 2016). We placed no further restrictions on the language or date of publication. We searched the US National Institutes of Health Trials Register (http://clinicaltrials.gov), and the WHO Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials (http://apps.who.int/trialsearch/default.aspx). We also checked the reference lists of excluded trials.

    SELECTION CRITERIA: We considered randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated any intervention for treating PEB, with male or female participants of any age, regardless of type of teeth (anterior or posterior, mandibular or maxillary). Trials could compare one type of intervention with another, with placebo, or with no treatment.

    DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Three pairs of review authors independently screened search records. We obtained full papers for potentially relevant trials. If data had been extracted, we would have followed the methods described in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions for the statistical analysis.

    MAIN RESULTS: We did not find any randomised controlled trial suitable for inclusion in this review.

    AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: We were unable to identify any reports of randomised controlled trials that evaluated the effects of different interventions for the treatment of post-extraction bleeding. In view of the lack of reliable evidence on this topic, clinicians must use their clinical experience to determine the most appropriate means of treating this condition, depending on patient-related factors. There is a need for well designed and appropriately conducted clinical trials on this topic, which conform to the CONSORT statement (www.consort-statement.org/).

    Matched MeSH terms: Hemorrhage/therapy*
  5. Nyin LY, Zainun AR, Tee HP
    Med J Malaysia, 2011 Aug;66(3):257-8.
    PMID: 22111453 MyJurnal
    Jejunal diverticulosis is a rare gastrointestinal condition manifested as benign outpouching from the jejunal wall. It is usually asymptomatic, but may present as obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. This condition is often found incidentally in the imaging work-up of patients with other gastrointestinal conditions. We present a case of jejunal diverticulosis in a 65-year-old gentleman with obscure overt gastrointestinal bleed.
    Matched MeSH terms: Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage/therapy
  6. Singh AH
    Scott Med J, 2011 Feb;56(1):59.
    PMID: 21515535 DOI: 10.1258/smj.2010.010026
    A 3-year old girl presented to our A&E with a complaint of an acute event of per rectal bleed. The parent had given a history of a visit to a nearby waterfall one day ago. Upon admission she developed hypotension and had a fainting episode due to the excessive passing of blood per rectum. The case report shows how the appropriate investigations were carried out and the twist behind the cause.
    Matched MeSH terms: Hemorrhage/therapy
  7. Achanna S, Mohamed Z, Krishnan M
    J Obstet Gynaecol Res, 2006 Jun;32(3):341-5.
    PMID: 16764627
    Acute puerperal uterine inversion is a life-threatening and unpredictable obstetric emergency. If overlooked, it could lead to a maternal death. Although the precise cause is unknown, it is postulated to be caused by the mismanagement of the third stage of labor with premature traction of the umbilical cord and fundal pressure before placental separation. At the Ipoh General Hospital in Malaysia there were 31 394 deliveries and four acute uterine inversions occurring from 1 January 2002 to 30 June 2005. The four patients were between 25 and 36 years of age and their parities were between two and three. When manual repositioning of the uterus failed, successful correction was accomplished by the O'Sullivan's hydrostatic method. One case had to undergo subtotal hysterectomy after repositioning because of massive hemorrhage secondary to placenta accreta. Early diagnosis, immediate treatment of shock, and replacement are essential.
    Matched MeSH terms: Postpartum Hemorrhage/therapy*
  8. Rachagan SP, Sivanesaratnam V, Kok KP, Raman S
    Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol, 1988 Feb;28(1):29-32.
    PMID: 3214380
    Over a 17-year period, 15 patients with acute puerperal inversion of the uterus were managed at the University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur, an incidence of 1 in 4,836 deliveries. Injudicious traction on the umbilical cord before the uterus was well contracted, was probably the most important causative factor. Haemorrhage was more severe when removal of the placenta was done prior to correction of the inversion. Either the hydrostatic method or manual replacement were used but more often a combination of both techniques was found necessary. With careful management of the third stage of labour, this complication can be avoided.
    Matched MeSH terms: Uterine Hemorrhage/therapy
  9. Jailani RF, Kosai NR, Yaacob NY, Jarmin R, Sutton P, Harunarrashid H, et al.
    Clin Ter, 2014;165(6):294-8.
    PMID: 25524184 DOI: 10.7417/CT.2014.1771
    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To compare the outcome of transarterial angioembolization (TAE) and surgery with endoscopically unmanageable non-variceal hemorrhage of the upper gastrointestinal tract.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: A case note review of all patients treated for non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding from January 2006 till January 2012 was performed.

    RESULTS: Fifty-four of 667 patients with non-variceal bleeding did not respond to endoscopic treatment. Nine of the 54 patients had incomplete data, leaving 45 patients in the study; 24 had angiography and another 21 had surgery. The two groups were broadly similar in terms of relevant clinical variables. Nineteen of 24 having angiography had embolisation. Re-bleeding recurred in 8 patients (33%) in the TAE group and 6 patients (28.6%) in the surgery group (p = 0.28). There was no statistically significant difference in post procedural complications (81% vs 62.5%, p = 0.17), 30-day mortality (33% vs 29.1%, p = 0.17 ) units of blood transfused (12.24 vs 8.92, p = 0.177) and mean hospital stay (30.7 vs 22.9 days, p = 0.281) observed in patients undergoing surgery as compared to TAE.

    CONCLUSIONS: TAE and surgery have similar outcomes in patients with endoscopically unmanageable non-variceal upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage.
    Matched MeSH terms: Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage/therapy*
  10. Anand J, Ghazala K, Chong VH
    Med J Malaysia, 2011 Aug;66(3):266-7.
    PMID: 22111457
    Lower gastrointestinal bleeding is usually due to haemorrhoids, diverticular disease, or colorectal cancer. Infective causes of gastrointestinal bleeding are rare. A 70-year-old lady was admitted with septic shock secondary to community acquired pneumonia. She later developed massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to colonic mucormycosis. Her condition deteriorated rapidly and she died of septicemia. Mucormycosis of the colon is extremely rare and is still associated with a high mortality.
    Matched MeSH terms: Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage/therapy
  11. Latar NH, Phang KS, Yaakub JA, Muhammad R
    Med J Malaysia, 2011 Jun;66(2):142-3.
    PMID: 22106696 MyJurnal
    Haemorrhage arising from gastric arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is rare and normally occurs in the elderly. Bleeding gastric AVM presenting in the younger age group is even rarer. We report a case of a 14 year old boy who presented with recurrent episodes of haematemesis. He subsequently underwent a proximal gastrectomy and the histological examination confirmed a gastric AVM. After reviewing the literature we believe this is the youngest ever reported case of bleeding gastric AVM reported in English literature.
    Matched MeSH terms: Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage/therapy
  12. Fadhilah M, Mimiwati Z, Fong KC
    Med J Malaysia, 2010 Dec;65(4):271-2.
    PMID: 21901943
    We report a case of a patient with hypertension and ischaemic heart disease on anti-platelet treatment, who developed uniocular profound visual loss from a submacular haemorrhage secondary to valsalva retinopathy. He was treated with a combination of intravitreal recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) and sulphur hexafluoride (SF6) gas followed by strict prone positioning. He demonstrated significant displacement of the haemorrhage and improvement of vision postoperatively.
    Matched MeSH terms: Retinal Hemorrhage/therapy*
  13. Yew BS, Ong WC, Chow WC, Lui HF
    Med J Malaysia, 2007 Aug;62(3):201-5.
    PMID: 18246907
    This retrospective study evaluated patients admitted to the Department of Gastroenterology, Singapore General Hospital for variceal bleeding in the year 2004. Improvement in outcome of variceal bleeding has been reported in the West. There is no regional data on this condition. This study aims to determine the characteristics and outcome of variceal bleeding in a tertiary hospital in Southeast Asia. Twenty-two patients were eligible. The main aetiologies of liver cirrhosis were chronic hepatitis B (38%) and alcohol (33%). Child's A, B and C were 29%, 48% and 24% respectively. Nineteen patients (86%) had bleeding oesophageal varices (band ligation performed). The remaining three patients (14%) had bleeding gastric varices (N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate injection performed). Detailed description of certain endoscopic findings was absent in up to 18 patients (82%). All patients received antibiotics and vasoactive drug. In-hospital mortality and rebleeding were 9% and 18% respectively. We conclude that the relatively low in-hospital mortality and rebleeding rates in our series are most probably due to the smaller proportion of patients with severe liver dysfunction and management which adhered to recommendations. Documentation of endoscopic findings needs to be improved to facilitate the continuation of care.
    Matched MeSH terms: Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage/therapy
  14. Lukman MR, Jasmi AY, Niza SS
    Asian J Surg, 2006 Apr;29(2):98-100.
    PMID: 16644511
    Intramural duodenal haematoma is a rare injury of the duodenum. Most reported cases are secondary to blunt trauma to the abdomen. Such injury following endoscopic intervention is even rarer, and there are no definite guidelines for its management. We report a case where endoscopic haemostasis of a bleeding duodenal ulcer resulted in a massive dissecting intramural duodenal haematoma with gastric outlet obstruction and obstructive jaundice.
    Matched MeSH terms: Peptic Ulcer Hemorrhage/therapy*
  15. Nawawi O, Young N, So S
    Australas Radiol, 2006 Feb;50(1):21-6.
    PMID: 16499722
    This is a retrospective study to evaluate our early experience of using selective microcoil embolization in patients who had gastrointestinal (GI) haemorrhage. From December 2002 to December 2003, six patients with GI haemorrhage (upper GI, n = 1; lower GI, n = 5) underwent superselective microcoil embolization. Microcatheters were used to carry out embolizations in branches of the superior mesenteric artery. Microcoils were used in five patients and a combination of microcoils and embolospheres was used in one patient. Technical success (bleeding target devascularization) was achieved in all patients who showed active bleeding at the time of angiography. Two patients had recurrent bleeding within 24 h of embolization, of which one (16.7%) died. The other patient did not require active intervention as bleeding was minimal and resolved with conservative management. Satisfactory clinical success (no rebleeding after 30 days) was achieved in five patients. No clinical signs and symptoms of bowel ischaemia occurred in these patients. Follow-up colonoscopy carried out in two patients did not show any signs of ischaemia in the affected bowel segments. Superselective microcoil embolization is an effective and safe method of controlling and arresting bleeding in GI haemorrhage.
    Matched MeSH terms: Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage/therapy*
  16. Ang CY, Samsudin AR, Karima AM, Nizam A
    Med J Malaysia, 2004 May;59 Suppl B:149-50.
    PMID: 15468862
    The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphological and biological properties of a locally produced "Bovine Bone Sponge" for use in dentistry. Bovine bone sponge was prepared from local calf bone. Endotoxin level and surface properties were investigated. The pore size and water uptake ability were measured and results were compared with the commercial haemostatic agent. The material was tested for its haemostatic property and its inhibition of alveolar bone resorption in a sheep model following dental extraction. Results revealed a significant difference in haemostatic effect, and a shorter bleeding time and a lower rate of alveolar bone resorption in bovine bone sponge compare to a commercial haemostatic agent.
    Matched MeSH terms: Hemorrhage/therapy*
  17. McCormick A, Qasim A
    Med J Malaysia, 2005 Jul;60 Suppl B:6-11.
    PMID: 16108165
    Matched MeSH terms: Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage/therapy*
  18. Lo TS, Tan YL, Cortes EF, Wu PY, Pue LB, Al-Kharabsheh A
    Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol, 2015 Jun;55(3):284-90.
    PMID: 26044791 DOI: 10.1111/ajo.12340
    The Food and Drug Administration has recently highlighted an increase in reported complications associated with the use of transvaginal mesh.
    Matched MeSH terms: Uterine Hemorrhage/therapy
  19. Soh EB, Lim JM
    Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol, 1999 Aug;39(3):389-90.
    PMID: 10554965
    This is a rare case of antepartum haemorrhage arising from the nonpregnant uterus in a woman with uterine didelphys. The bleeding and subsequent passage of a decidual cast did not have any adverse effect on the ongoing pregnancy.
    Matched MeSH terms: Uterine Hemorrhage/therapy
  20. Achanna KS, Goh CS
    Med J Malaysia, 2003 Mar;58(1):128-30.
    PMID: 14556339
    A case of spontaneous rupture of uterine artery in the second trimester of pregnancy is described. Haemorrhage from rupture of uterine artery during pregnancy was discovered at laparotomy. This was an unusual but serious complication of pregnancy. This condition is extremely rare and one must consider it in cases of incomprehensible abdominal pain with or without haemodynamic collapse. A review of the literature revealed only four similar cases so far. This pregnancy continued till 37 weeks pregnancy and had a spontaneous vaginal delivery. Immediate institution of effective resuscitative measures and early surgical intervention were essential to both foetal and maternal survival.
    Matched MeSH terms: Uterine Hemorrhage/therapy
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