Displaying publications 1 - 20 of 59 in total

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  1. Katta NK, Kakkunath Mani S
    Clin Case Rep, 2020 Jul;8(7):1327-1328.
    PMID: 32695392 DOI: 10.1002/ccr3.2866
    When planning extraction of teeth with poor prognosis especially lower first permanent molars, it is important to consider the timing of tooth removal and its effect on future occlusion to avoid interventions.
    Matched MeSH terms: Tooth Extraction
  2. Suhaila Muhammad Ali, Nazih Shaaban Mustafa, Muhannad Ali Kashmoola
    MyJurnal
    To investigate the pattern and major causes of tooth extraction among patients
    attending IIUM Kulliyyah of Dentistry Polyclinic. (Copied from article).
    Matched MeSH terms: Tooth Extraction
  3. Chai WL
    Dent Update, 2000 Dec;27(10):515.
    PMID: 11218617
    Matched MeSH terms: Tooth Extraction/psychology*
  4. Sumanth KN, Prashanti E, Aggarwal H, Kumar P, Lingappa A, Muthu MS, et al.
    PMID: 27285450 DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD011930.pub2
    BACKGROUND: Post-extraction bleeding (PEB) is a recognised, frequently encountered complication in dental practice, which is defined as bleeding that continues beyond 8 to 12 hours after dental extraction. The incidence of post-extraction bleeding varies from 0% to 26%. If post-extraction bleeding is not managed, complications can range from soft tissue haematomas to severe blood loss. Local causes of bleeding include soft tissue and bone bleeding. Systemic causes include platelet problems, coagulation disorders or excessive fibrinolysis, and inherited or acquired problems (medication induced). There is a wide array of techniques suggested for the treatment of post-extraction bleeding, which include interventions aimed at both local and systemic causes.

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of interventions for treating different types of post-extraction bleeding.

    SEARCH METHODS: We searched the following electronic databases: The Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register (to 22 March 2016); The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; The Cochrane Library 2016, Issue 2); MEDLINE via OVID (1946 to 22 March 2016); CINAHL via EBSCO (1937 to 22 March 2016). Due to the ongoing Cochrane project to search EMBASE and add retrieved clinical trials to CENTRAL, we searched only the last 11 months of EMBASE via OVID (1 May 2015 to 22 March 2016). We placed no further restrictions on the language or date of publication. We searched the US National Institutes of Health Trials Register (http://clinicaltrials.gov), and the WHO Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials (http://apps.who.int/trialsearch/default.aspx). We also checked the reference lists of excluded trials.

    SELECTION CRITERIA: We considered randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated any intervention for treating PEB, with male or female participants of any age, regardless of type of teeth (anterior or posterior, mandibular or maxillary). Trials could compare one type of intervention with another, with placebo, or with no treatment.

    DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Three pairs of review authors independently screened search records. We obtained full papers for potentially relevant trials. If data had been extracted, we would have followed the methods described in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions for the statistical analysis.

    MAIN RESULTS: We did not find any randomised controlled trial suitable for inclusion in this review.

    AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: We were unable to identify any reports of randomised controlled trials that evaluated the effects of different interventions for the treatment of post-extraction bleeding. In view of the lack of reliable evidence on this topic, clinicians must use their clinical experience to determine the most appropriate means of treating this condition, depending on patient-related factors. There is a need for well designed and appropriately conducted clinical trials on this topic, which conform to the CONSORT statement (www.consort-statement.org/).

    Matched MeSH terms: Tooth Extraction/adverse effects*
  5. Western JS, Dicksit DD
    J Conserv Dent, 2016 Jul-Aug;19(4):343-6.
    PMID: 27563183 DOI: 10.4103/0972-0707.186457
    AIM OF THIS STUDY: The aim was to evaluate the efficiency of different sterilization methods on extracted human teeth (EHT) by a systematic review of in vitro randomized controlled trials.
    METHODOLOGY: An extensive electronic database literature search concerning the sterilization of EHT was conducted. The search terms used were "human teeth, sterilization, disinfection, randomized controlled trials, and infection control." Randomized controlled trials which aim at comparing the efficiency of different methods of sterilization of EHT were all included in this systematic review.
    RESULTS: Out of 1618 articles obtained, eight articles were selected for this systematic review. The sterilization methods reviewed were autoclaving, 10% formalin, 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, 3% hydrogen peroxide, 2% glutaraldehyde, 0.1% thymol, and boiling to 100°C. Data were extracted from the selected individual studies and their findings were summarized.
    CONCLUSION: Autoclaving and 10% formalin can be considered as 100% efficient and reliable methods. While the use of 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, 3% hydrogen peroxide, 2% glutaraldehyde, 0.1% thymol, and boiling to 100°C was inefficient and unreliable methods of sterilization of EHT.
    KEYWORDS: Autoclaving; extracted human teeth; formalin; sterilization methods; systematic review
    Matched MeSH terms: Tooth Extraction
  6. Hossain MZ, Daud S, Nambiar P, Razak FA, Ab-Murat N, Saub R, et al.
    Arch Oral Biol, 2017 Aug;80:51-55.
    PMID: 28371626 DOI: 10.1016/j.archoralbio.2017.03.018
    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate correlations between dental pulp cell count of odontoblasts, subodontoblasts and fibroblasts and age, within different age groups. Formulation of regression equations using the dental pulp cell count for predicting age was attempted.

    DESIGN: Eighty-one extracted teeth were grouped into two age groups (6-25 years, 26-80 years). The teeth were demineralized and histological sections were prepared for cell count. Regression equations were generated from regression analysis of cell count and tested for age estimation.

    RESULTS: The number of dental pulp cells were found to increase until around the third decade of life and following this, the odontoblasts and subodontoblasts cell numbers began to decline while the fibroblasts seemed to remain almost stationary. The Pearson correlation test revealed a significant positive correlation between the cell number for all type of cells and age in the 6-25 years group (r=+0.791 for odontoblasts, r=+0.600 for subodontoblasts and r=+0.680 for fibroblasts). In the 26-80 years age group, a significant negative correlation of the odontoblasts (r=-0.777) and subodontoblasts (r=-0.715) with age was observed but for fibroblasts, the correlation value was negligible (r=-0.165). Regression equations generated using odontoblasts and subodontoblasts cell number were applicable for age estimation. The standard error of estimates (SEEs) were around±5years for 6-25 years and±8years for 26-80 years age groups. The mean values of the estimated and chronological ages were not significantly different.

    CONCLUSIONS: A significant correlation between the cell count of odontoblasts and subodontoblasts with age was demonstrated. Regression equations using odontoblasts and subodontoblasts cell number can be used to predict age with some limitations.

    Matched MeSH terms: Tooth Extraction
  7. Siti Mazlipah Ismail, Firdaus Hariri
    Ann Dent, 2020;27(1):66-68.
    MyJurnal
    There is a wide variation in the morphology of third maxillary molar which can be difficult to be identified radiographically. We present a case of a 26 year-old Yemeni female patient presented with difficult extraction of her left maxillary third molar. The extracted tooth showed a rare variation of root morphology, having four roots with three roots curving palatally at the apices. This report emphasized the potential complex morphological variation of maxillary third molar which may lead to the difficulty of a routine straight forward procedure thus needing careful extraction maneuvering to prevent any complications.
    Matched MeSH terms: Tooth Extraction
  8. Boon LC
    Med J Malaysia, 1987 Sep;42(3):207-8.
    PMID: 3506647
    A case of actinomycosis occurring four years after the surgical removal of an impacted lower third molar is presented. The need for careful wound debridement and the use of antibiotics as a prophylactic measure is emphasized.
    Matched MeSH terms: Tooth Extraction/adverse effects*
  9. Veerabhadrappa SK, Hesarghatta Ramamurthy P, Yadav S, Bin Zamzuri AT
    Acta Odontol Scand, 2021 Oct;79(7):514-522.
    PMID: 33764264 DOI: 10.1080/00016357.2021.1901984
    OBJECTIVE: To perform a systematic review of the characteristics of ectopic mandibular third molar (EMTM) in terms of its clinical presentation, radiographic findings, associated lesions, management and post-operative complications.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: We searched the Pubmed, Medline, Embase and EBSCO databases for full-text, peer-reviewed journal publications from January 1965 to August 2020. Data extraction was done using preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines.

    RESULTS: Our search yielded 45 case reports involving 48 EMTM teeth. The mean age of the patients was 46.3 years with an age range of 22-80 years. Thirty-two cases were seen in women as compared to 13 cases in men. The majority of the cases (42) were unilateral, with only three bilateral cases. Among the 48 EMTM teeth, 21 were seen in the condylar region followed by 13 in the ramus, seven in the sigmoid notch, three in the angle and two each in the coronoid process and the lower border of the mandible. Twenty-five EMTM teeth had histopathologically confirmed dentigerous cysts, eight teeth had chronic infection/inflammation/granulation tissue, two had radicular cysts, two had infected cysts, two teeth had normal follicular spaces, and associated lesions were not mentioned for nine teeth. The most common symptoms were swelling (33 teeth) and pain (29 teeth), and six teeth were asymptomatic. Surgical removal through intraoral approach was carried out for 27 teeth, while an extra-oral approach was adopted in 15 teeth, a spontaneous regression of the pericoronal radiolucency was noticed in one tooth, four teeth were not treated and choice of treatment was not mentioned for one tooth. Mild transient paraesthesia was frequently observed; however, serious post-surgical complications were not reported.

    CONCLUSIONS: The present review found that EMTM can present with complex clinicopathological characteristics, with a majority of the cases being asymptomatic in the beginning and turning out to be symptomatic with lesions at later stages, requiring surgical intervention.

    Matched MeSH terms: Tooth Extraction/adverse effects
  10. Kumbargere Nagraj S, Prashanti E, Aggarwal H, Lingappa A, Muthu MS, Kiran Kumar Krishanappa S, et al.
    Cochrane Database Syst Rev, 2018 03 04;3:CD011930.
    PMID: 29502332 DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD011930.pub3
    BACKGROUND: Post-extraction bleeding (PEB) is a recognised, frequently encountered complication in dental practice, which is defined as bleeding that continues beyond 8 to 12 hours after dental extraction. The incidence of post-extraction bleeding varies from 0% to 26%. If post-extraction bleeding is not managed, complications can range from soft tissue haematomas to severe blood loss. Local causes of bleeding include soft tissue and bone bleeding. Systemic causes include platelet problems, coagulation disorders or excessive fibrinolysis, and inherited or acquired problems (medication induced). There is a wide array of techniques suggested for the treatment of post-extraction bleeding, which include interventions aimed at both local and systemic causes. This is an update of a review published in June 2016.

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of interventions for treating different types of post-extraction bleeding.

    SEARCH METHODS: Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 24 January 2018), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library, 2017, Issue 12), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 24 January 2018), Embase Ovid (1 May 2015 to 24 January 2018) and CINAHL EBSCO (1937 to 24 January 2018). The US National Institutes of Health Trials Registry (ClinicalTrials.gov) and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform were searched for ongoing trials. We searched the reference lists of relevant systematic reviews.

    SELECTION CRITERIA: We considered randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated any intervention for treating PEB, with male or female participants of any age, regardless of type of teeth (anterior or posterior, mandibular or maxillary). Trials could compare one type of intervention with another, with placebo, or with no treatment.

    DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Three pairs of review authors independently screened search records. We obtained full papers for potentially relevant trials. If data had been extracted, we would have followed the methods described in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions for the statistical analysis.

    MAIN RESULTS: We did not find any randomised controlled trial suitable for inclusion in this review.

    AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: We were unable to identify any reports of randomised controlled trials that evaluated the effects of different interventions for the treatment of post-extraction bleeding. In view of the lack of reliable evidence on this topic, clinicians must use their clinical experience to determine the most appropriate means of treating this condition, depending on patient-related factors. There is a need for well designed and appropriately conducted clinical trials on this topic, which conform to the CONSORT statement (www.consort-statement.org/).

    Matched MeSH terms: Tooth Extraction/adverse effects*
  11. Ong, A.H.
    Ann Dent, 1997;4(1):-.
    MyJurnal
    The palatal root of the first permanent molar is the most commonly deflected root into the maxillary sinus during extraction. A rational approach to the surgical removal of a root from the antrum is important. Some surgeons prefer the alveolar approach while others prefer the Caldwell-Luc operation. A case is presented where the palatal root tip of the left upper first molar was removed from the maxillary sinus by the Caldwell-Luc approach with simultaneous closure of the oro-antral fistula resulting from dental extraction. A fibreoptic light probe was used. The advantages and disadvantages as well as how to avoid the common complications of this surgical technique are discussed. A good result was achieved with successful removal of the root and no loss of sensibility of the teeth and/or gum for this case.
    Matched MeSH terms: Tooth Extraction
  12. Ling, X.F., Chan, J.A.
    Malaysian Dental Journal, 2008;29(1):41-45.
    MyJurnal
    The general aim of this study was to examine the patients’ perception of dental extractions. The specific objectives were to understand the purpose of extractions from the patients’ point of view, to find out the relationship between age and type of teeth extracted and to compare the patients’ perceptions with clinical indications for dental extraction. The survey was done using self administered, structured questionnaires to collect information. From the survey we found that toothache (33%) and the presence of cavities (34%) were the main reasons for extraction from the patients’ point of view. Besides that, the number of patients requiring extractions decreased with age. The main clinical indication for tooth extraction was caries (73%) and of these, 29% of restorable teeth were extracted.
    Matched MeSH terms: Tooth Extraction
  13. Rajaran JR, Nazimi AJ, Rajandram RK
    BMJ Case Rep, 2017 Sep 27;2017.
    PMID: 28954756 DOI: 10.1136/bcr-2017-221892
    Surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molar is a routine procedure in oral surgery. Various iatrogenic complications related to the procedure has been discussed well in the literatures before. Some of these complications are related to the wrong usage of instruments and techniques. Here we discuss a rare complication on a 42-year-old male, related to the use of high-speed handpiece drill in mandibular third molar removal in a general dental office setting. He was referred when a high speed tungsten carbide bur was accidentally broken and displaced into the mandibular bone during surgical procedure. It is not common to use a high-speed handpiece in impacted third molar removal. This iatrogenic complication could have been totally avoided with the use of proper equipment and technique; therefore raising awareness regarding wrong usage of instrument is vital to avoid similar incidents in the future.
    Matched MeSH terms: Tooth Extraction/adverse effects*; Tooth Extraction/instrumentation
  14. Hong CY
    Med J Malaysia, 1976 Mar;30(3):239-40.
    PMID: 958055
    Matched MeSH terms: Tooth Extraction
  15. Menon RK, Kar Yan L, Gopinath D, Botelho MG
    J Investig Clin Dent, 2019 Nov;10(4):e12460.
    PMID: 31608608 DOI: 10.1111/jicd.12460
    AIM: Randomized controlled trials might be reporting a higher postoperative infection rate for third molar surgery compared to other study designs due to unclear criteria for the classification of "infections". The aim of the present retrospective study was to assess the infection rate after third molar surgery with and without postoperative antibiotic prescription.

    METHODS: Case records of patients who underwent third molar extractions at the Prince Philip Dental Hospital in Hong Kong between 3 July 2012 and 22 June 2017 were evaluated retrospectively. Data extraction was performed for indications, clinical and radiographic findings, antibiotic treatment, postoperative complications, and treatment for postoperative infection. The odds ratio (OR) for postoperative infection was estimated.

    RESULTS: In total, 1615 extracted over 5 years from 992 patient records were included in the final analysis. Antibiotics were prescribed postoperatively for 44% of the extractions. The overall infection rate was 2.05%. There was no significant difference in infection rates between the groups which underwent extractions with or without antibiotics (OR = .68; P = .289). We found a significantly higher risk for infections with increasing age (P = .002).

    CONCLUSION: Infection rates after third molar extraction is minimal in the current setting, with no significant benefit from postoperative antibiotic prescription.

    Matched MeSH terms: Tooth Extraction
  16. Kattimani VS, Prathigudupu RS, Jairaj A, Khader MA, Rajeev K, Khader AA
    J Contemp Dent Pract, 2019 Aug 01;20(8):987-993.
    PMID: 31797859
    Since a long time, the preservation of the socket is emphasized for various reasons. Many studies have suggested the ridge preservation through socket grafting using various bone graft substitute materials (GSMs). But none of the studies suggested the material of choice for the grafting. So, the systematic review was planned to analyze the outcomes of synthetic hydroxyapatite (SHA) graft material for socket preservation. The review was aimed to determine the existing evidence for the use of SHA GSM for grafting and its usefulness.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: The literature search was performed for the studies published in the English language independently by all four authors (search team) in the Medline database through the PubMed search engine for the past 5 years. The study involved predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria for the search. The final lists of clinical trials were analyzed to determine the existing evidence and suggested the mechanism of action.

    REVIEW RESULTS: The search resulted in 117 titles. After application of inclusion and exclusion criteria, a total of seven studies were found eligible for this systematic review. Out of seven, two studies were found eligible for meta-analysis whereas remaining included for the systematic review.

    CONCLUSION: The meta-analysis favors socket grafting compared to control in terms of preservation of existing bone height and width. The SHA grafting showed successful bone regeneration with less connective tissue component. The histomorphometric evaluation showed a good bone regeneration associated with SHA than xenograft. Within the limitations of this meta-analysis, the synthetic GSM can be used for socket grafting.

    CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: In the wake of increasing graft materials in the market and different origin raw material sources for the preparation of graft materials, clinicians are in dilemma for selection and its use. The success of grafting depends on the selection of appropriate material with a suitable calcium/phosphate (Ca/P) ratio. The review provided available evidence for the use of SHA.

    Matched MeSH terms: Tooth Extraction
  17. Leung YY, Yeung AWK, Ismail IN, Wong NSM
    Int J Oral Maxillofac Surg, 2020 Oct;49(10):1360-1366.
    PMID: 32340909 DOI: 10.1016/j.ijom.2020.03.016
    A residual bone defect at the distal aspect of the adjacent second molar may occur after total removal of the lower third molar. Lower third molar coronectomy has been proved to be a safe alternative to total removal, but the extent of bone regeneration at the adjacent tooth after coronectomy is not well reported. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the long-term bone regeneration at the distal aspect of the adjacent second molar after lower third molar coronectomy. Preoperative and postoperative cone beam computed tomography scans were measured to assess bone regeneration at the distobuccal (DB), mid-distal (MD), and distolingual (DL) aspects of the lower second molar. Forty-eight coronectomies in 37 patients (23 female) with a mean±standard deviation age of 29.1±7.2 years were assessed. The mean follow-up was 93.2±8.7 months. The mean bone level increase at DB, MD, and DL aspects was 3.2±1.6mm, 3.5±1.5mm, and 3.2±1.6mm, respectively; the bone levels were significantly higher than the preoperative measurements (P<0.001). Age and impaction patterns were not factors affecting bone regeneration. Based on this study, it appears that coronectomy of the lower third molar brings favourable bone regeneration at the distal aspect of the adjacent second molar.
    Matched MeSH terms: Tooth Extraction
  18. Siti Nidzwani, M.M., Loo, S.P.S.
    Medicine & Health, 2018;13(2):170-174.
    MyJurnal
    Ludwig angina is a fulminant condition that is potentially lethal. If left unrecognized or untreated, this condition carries a mortality rate of up to 50%. We illustrate a case of 43-year-old male who presented with signs and symptoms of Ludwig angina over a period of two days. The patient had history of tooth extraction prior to the onset of symptoms. Despite typical clinical presentation, Ludwig angina was not considered during the first visit to medical. Ludwig angina is a clinical diagnosis that requires high index of suspicion. Delay in the diagnosis increase the risk of airway obstruction due to its rapidly spreading oedema of the upper airway.
    Matched MeSH terms: Tooth Extraction
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