Displaying publications 1 - 20 of 141 in total

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  1. Moore K, Prasad AM, Satheesha Nayak B
    Kathmandu Univ Med J (KUMJ), 2021 6 24;18(71):313-315.
    PMID: 34158443
    The musculocutaneous and median nerves frequently show variations from their normal course. The purpose of this paper is to report a rare variation, in which the right musculocutaneous nerve was absent. Consequently, the median nerve supplied motor innervation to the flexor compartment of the arm and sensory innervation to the lateral aspect of the forearm. The primary targets of this paper are orthopedic surgeons, anesthesiologists and radiologists. In cases of injuries to the upper limb, knowledge of these variations can assist them in avoiding misdiagnoses.
    Matched MeSH terms: Cadaver
  2. Ahmad A, Ahmad AH, Dieng H, Satho T, Ahmad H, Aziz AT, et al.
    J Med Entomol, 2011 Nov;48(6):1236-46.
    PMID: 22238885
    There is accumulating evidence that criminals wrap dead bodies in an attempt to conceal evidence. To anticipate the forensic implications of this phenomenon, we examined whether flies that are naturally associated with cadavers exhibit a delay in attendance or differ in species composition and abundance patterns because of the presence of wrapping material. Wrapped and exposed carcasses of dead monkeys placed in an oil plantation in Kedah, Malaysia, were visited over 50 d. On daily visits to each of the six carcasses, visiting adult flies were sampled using hand nets. Flies of 12 families were encountered. Calliphoridae (Chrysomya rufifacies Macquart and C. megacephala (F.) was the most prevalent family, followed by Sphaeroceridae. Some families tended to be more abundant in WRCs (i.e., Calliphoridae, Muscidae, and Phoridae), whereas others (i.e., Piophilidae, Sepsidae, and Psychodidae) were more prevalent in exposed carcasses. Wrapping delayed the arrival of all fly species encountered, with delays varying from 1 to 13 d depending on species. Wrapping did not affect species composition of flies, but prolong the occurrence of some species. The results of the current study emphasize the need to take into consideration the presence of a wrap when estimating postmortem interval.
    Matched MeSH terms: Cadaver*
  3. Lee HL
    Malays J Pathol, 1996 Dec;18(2):125-7.
    PMID: 10879234
    Forensically important entomological specimens recovered from 95 forensic cases of human cadavers from April 1993 to May 1996 in Malaysia were identified and analysed. The results indicated that 73.7% of these specimens were Chrysomya species, occurring either as single or mixed infestations. Of these, the most prominent species were Ch megacephala (F.) and Ch rufifacies (Macquart). Other fly maggots recovered included Sarcophaga spp., Lucilia spp. and Hermetia spp., mostly occurring together with other calliphorine flies. A member of Muscidae fly, Ophyra spp. was also recovered for the first time.
    Matched MeSH terms: Cadaver*
  4. Ravindran J
    Med J Malaysia, 1995 Sep;50(3):284-5.
    PMID: 8926913
    Matched MeSH terms: Cadaver*
  5. Lee HL
    Malays J Pathol, 1989 Aug;11:33-6.
    PMID: 2632998
    A total of 101 entomological specimens recovered from human cadavers were processed and studied. Analysis of the data indicated that about 95% of these specimens were maggots of flies. Maggots of the blowfly Chrysomya (Family: Calliphoridae) especially Ch. rufifacis and Ch. megacephala were predominantly found in 77 cases (76.2%) while larvae of several other flies of the genera Sarcophaga, Calliphora, Lucilia and hermetia were also recovered. It was notable that Musca domestica or other related flies were not found in all these specimens. The age of these larvae was useful in the determination of the minimum time lapsed after death. However, more biological studies on animal carcases should be conducted for more accurate determinations. Methods of collection, preservation and despatching of specimens were also discussed.
    Matched MeSH terms: Cadaver*
  6. Kumara TK, Abu Hassan A, Che Salmah MR, Bhupinder S
    Trop Biomed, 2012 Mar;29(1):197-9.
    PMID: 22543622 MyJurnal
    A burned human remain was found outdoor (5º 27' N, 100º 16' E) in Penang Island. The deceased was last seen alive on 23 April 2010 at 2230 h and was found burned on 24 April 2010 at 1920 h. Larval aggregation of second instar Chrysomya megacephala was observed on the chest of the deceased.
    Matched MeSH terms: Cadaver*
  7. Nazni WA, Jeffery J, Sa'diyah I, Noorjuliana WM, Chen CD, Rohayu SA, et al.
    Trop Biomed, 2008 Aug;25(2):173-5.
    PMID: 18948890
    Piophila casei (Linnaeus) (Diptera: Piophilidae) is reported from human cadavers in two separate forensic cases for the first time in Malaysia. Both bodies were found indoors. The first case, was that of a male of unknown nationality and age and also contained maggots of the muscid Ophyra spinigera (Stein). The second case was a female Chinese whose body also contained other species of maggots but these were not identifiable.
    Matched MeSH terms: Cadaver*
  8. Choy KW, Kogilavani S, Norshalizah M, Rani S, Aspalilah A, Farihah HS, et al.
    Clin Ter, 2013 May-Jun;164(3):197-201.
    PMID: 23868619 DOI: 10.7417/CT.2013.1549
    Anomalous structures of the liver are incidentally detected during autopsies or during routine cadaveric dissection. The present study aimed to observe the abnormal shapes of quadrate lobe, accessory sulci and ligamentum teres of the liver.
    Matched MeSH terms: Cadaver
  9. Abd Latiff A, Das S, Sulaiman IM, Hlaing KP, Suhaimi FH, Ghazalli H, et al.
    Clin Ter, 2009;160(4):291-3.
    PMID: 19795082
    The sphenoid bone is known to have several foramina and the foramen ovale is one amongst them. The foramen ovale transmits the mandibular nerve, accessory meningeal artery, lesser petrosal nerve and the emissary veins. There have been past reports on the variations of the different foramina present in the skull but there are no reports on the variations of the skull foramina from any of the South-East Asian countries. The present study aims to highlight the presence of an accessory foramen ovale in the skull in Malaysian population. Both sides of fifteen adult skulls (n = 30) were taken for observation of any variations in the foramen ovale. We observed the presence of accessory foramen ovale on the left side of a single skull (3.33%). The minute accessory foramen ovale was located 0.1 cm medial to the normal foramen ovale. The anomalous accessory foramen ovale was circular in shape and measured 0.1 cm in diameter. Anatomical knowledge of the foramen ovale is important for all neurosurgical procedures involving the trigeminal nerve and administration of anaesthesia in the mandibular nerve. Interestingly, the percutaneous biopsy of the cavernous sinus is also performed through the foramen ovale. Prior knowledge of the presence of an accessory foramen ovale may be important for academic, anthropological, forensic and clinical purpose and the present study aims to highlight such.
    Matched MeSH terms: Cadaver
  10. Zuha RM, Disney RHL
    Zootaxa, 2018 Nov 02;4508(4):551-561.
    PMID: 30485963 DOI: 10.11646/zootaxa.4508.4.3
    Megaselia bangiensis Disney sp. nov., M. cumpapillarum Disney sp. nov., M. hyplongiseta Disney sp. nov. and M. selangorensis Disney sp. nov. were collected from rabbit carcasses placed in concealed environments in Bangi, Malaysia.
    Matched MeSH terms: Cadaver
  11. Ramanadham S, Kalthur SG, Pai SR
    Malays J Med Sci, 2011 Jan;18(1):68-71.
    PMID: 22135576
    Knowledge of muscular, vascular, and neural variations in the axilla is of great clinical importance, especially in mastectomies, breast reconstruction, and axillary bypass operations. In the present paper, we report unilateral variations observed in the axillary region of a male cadaver. A fibromuscular axillary arch was observed on the right side. On the same side, there was a bifurcated axillary vein; a medial cutaneous nerve of the arm passed through and later ran beneath this axillary vein. In addition, the intercostobrachial nerve was absent on the right side. The clinical significance of the variations observed and their embryological basis are discussed in this paper.
    Matched MeSH terms: Cadaver
  12. Khan AA, Asari MA, Pasha MA
    Folia Morphol (Warsz), 2015 12 29;75(3):306-310.
    PMID: 26711654 DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2015.0130
    Variations of the sciatic nerve have been extensively studied in the past including its relationship with the piriformis muscle and associated clinical conditions like piriformis syndrome and sciatica. In the present study we noticed some interesting variations of the sciatic nerve, which were slightly different from the cases described earlier. In the previous studies most of the authors described the higher division of sciatic nerve and none of them discussed its formation. In this study we tried to look its formation from the sacral plexus and its divisions in the thigh. We noticed that in one cadaver the two components of the sciatic nerve originated directly from the sacral plexus and coursed down without merging in the thigh. Should this be called a higher division or non formation of the sciatic nerve? On the other hand in two other cadavers, the two divisions after emerging separately from the sacral plexus, united in the gluteal region and in the thigh respectively. Should we call this as higher division or low formation of the sciatic nerve? In two other cadavers the sciatic nerve emerged from the greater sciatic foramen below the piriformis and divided in the gluteal region itself. Ideally this should be called as higher division of sciatic nerve.
    Matched MeSH terms: Cadaver
  13. Satheesha NB, Soumya KV
    Kathmandu Univ Med J (KUMJ), 2021 6 25;18(72):340-343.
    PMID: 34165088
    Background Gallstone disease (GSD) is one among the most prevalent diseases that affects approximately 10-15% of the population. It is associated with many other diseases like gallbladder cancer, renal stones, atherosclerosis, coronary heart disease and stroke. Objective Objective of this study is to document the prevalence of gallstones among south Indian cadavers. Method One hundred and twenty three South Indian cadaveric livers/gallbladders were observed for the presence of gallstones. The age range was 40 to 70 years. The gallbladders were palpated to know the presence of stones. They were then dissected and the stones were classified based on appearance. Gall bladder walls were also observed to know the associated fibrosis. Result Among the cadavers studied, 0.81% possessed cholesterol stones and 4.06% had pigment stones. Among the stones, 83.33% were pigment stones and 16.66% were cholesterol stones. Conclusion Compared to the western countries and north Indian studies, the prevalence of gallstone diseaseis low in the south Indian population (4.87%). The low prevalence was probably due to the low socioeconomic status and the diet and lifestyle.
    Matched MeSH terms: Cadaver
  14. Azmiera N, Mariana A, Heo CC
    Trop Biomed, 2019 Dec 01;36(4):1099-1104.
    PMID: 33597479
    This is the first record of phoretic histiostomatid mites found on a forensically important blow fly species, Chrysomya villeneuvi (Diptera: Calliphoridae), collected from decomposing rabbit carcasses placed in Bukit Lagong Forest Reserve, Sungai Buloh and MARDI Cameron Highlands, Malaysia. The blow flies frequenting around the carcasses were first captured using an insect net. After pinning, they were examined under a stereomicroscope and mites phoretic on their body were carefully removed and preserved in 70% ethanol. Mites were cleared in lactic acid before mounting on slides using Hoyer's medium and identified under a compound microscope. The flies and their mites were identified as C. villeneuvi and deutonymphs of Histiostoma spp. (Astigmata: Histiostomatidae), respectively. This insectmite association may be useful to provide insights regarding the minimum post-mortem interval and the location of death in forensic entomological investigations.
    Matched MeSH terms: Cadaver
  15. Khoo LS, Lai PS, Saidin MH, Noor Z, Mahmood MS
    Forensic Sci Int, 2018 Apr;285:50-57.
    PMID: 29433011 DOI: 10.1016/j.forsciint.2018.01.018
    Cadaver body bags are the conventional method to contain a human body or human remains, which includes the use for storage and transportation of the deceased at any crime scene or disaster scene. During disasters, most often than not, the first responders including the police will be equipped with cadaver body bags to do scene processing of human remains and collection of personal belongings at the disaster site. However, in an unanticipated large scale disasters involving hundreds and thousands of fatalities, cadaver body bags supplies may be scarce. The authors have therefore innovated the cling film plastic wrap as an alternative for the cadaver body bag used at the disaster site. The plastic wrap was tested on six different experimental subjects, i.e. both adult and child mannequins; body parts of the mannequin figure (arm and hand); a human adult subject and an unknown dead body. The strengths of the cling film plastic wrap are discussed in comparison with the cadaver body bag in the aspects of costing, weight, duration of the wrap, water and body fluid resistant properties, visibility and other advantages. An average savings of more than 5000% are noted for both adult body wrap and child body wrap compared to the cadaver body wrap. This simply means that the authors can either wrap 25 adult dead bodies or 80 children dead bodies with the cost of 1 cadaver body bag. The cling film plastic wrap has proven to have significant innovation impact for dead body management particularly by the first responders in large scale disasters. With proper handling of dead bodies, first responders can manage the dead with dignity and respect in an overwhelmed situation to facilitate the humanitarian victim identification process later.
    Matched MeSH terms: Cadaver*
  16. Kumara TK, Abu Hassan A, Che Salmah MR, Bhupinder S
    Trop Biomed, 2010 Apr;27(1):131-3.
    PMID: 20562823
    The pupae of Desmometopa sp. (Diptera: Milichiidae) were collected from a human corpse found indoor in active decay stage together with the larvae of Sarcophagidae, Synthesiomyia nudiseta (Wulp), Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius) and Chrysomya rufifacies (Macquart). This research note is the first report of the Desmometopa sp. recovered from a human corpse in Malaysia.
    Matched MeSH terms: Cadaver*
  17. Heo CC, Mohamad AR, Rosli H, Nurul Ashikin A, Chen CD, John J, et al.
    Trop Biomed, 2009 Apr;26(1):106-9.
    PMID: 19696735
    An observational study was conducted in an oil palm plantation in Tanjung Sepat, Selangor, Malaysia on August until September 2007 to note the decomposition process of pigs and their related faunal succession. We collected six species of ants (Formicidae) from 3 subfamilies: Formicinae (Oecophylla smaragdina and Anoplolepis gracilipes), Myrmicinae (Tetramorium sp. and Pheidologeton sp.) and Ponerinae (Odontoponera sp. and Diacamma sp.) that were associated with pig carcasses placed on the ground. Oecophylla smaragdina, Pheidologeton sp. and Tetramorium sp. were found on a partially burnt pig carcass whereas the other species were recovered from unburned pig carcass. These ants predated on fly eggs, larvae, pupae and adults. Ants could be found at all stages of decomposition starting from fresh until dry stage. Predatory ants can reduce fly population and thus may affect the rate of carcass decomposition but this was not seen in our study. Even though O. smaragdina was seen at all stages of decomposition of the burnt pig, this did not alter much the decomposition process by fly larvae.
    Matched MeSH terms: Cadaver*
  18. Mashaly AM, Al-Ajmi RA, Rady A, Al-Musawi Z, Farrukh A
    Trop Biomed, 2019 Sep 01;36(3):630-639.
    PMID: 33597485
    The type and amount of resources available significantly influences the structure and dynamics of food webs. In this study, we analyzed differences in species richness of scavengers based on carcass type in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. We collected insects from experimental carcasses of three different types, domestic dogs (Canidae, Canis lupus familiaris), Hijazi goats (Bovidae, Capra aegagrus hircus), and camels (Camelidae, Camelus dromedarius). Data collection was conducted during the decay stage in June, 2016. We used mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (mtCOI) barcodes as a marker for the molecular identification of the scavenger insects. The results showed that there were more insects on the camels and goats than the dogs. In total, seven species were found on all carrions. Six species were found on the camels and goats, but only five were found on the dog. Musca domestica was the most collected species of flies whereas, Necrobia rufipes was the most collected species of beetles. Overall, this study showed that carrion type had an effect on the type and number of insects attracted to the carrions. Thus, one of the significant factors that influence the associated scavenger assemblage is a carcass type.
    Matched MeSH terms: Cadaver*
  19. Zyoud TYT, Abdul Rashid SN, Suppiah S, Mahmud R, Kabeer A, Abd Manaf R, et al.
    Malays J Pathol, 2020 Dec;42(3):423-431.
    PMID: 33361724
    INTRODUCTION: Post-mortem computed tomography (PMCT) provides information that helps in the determination of the cause of death and corpse identification of disaster victims. One of the methods for corpse identification includes assessment of the body stature. There is a lack of post-mortem imaging studies that focus on the anthropometric assessment of corpses. Our aim was to identify the relationship between cadaveric spine length and autopsy length (AL) among and autopsy length (AL) among a Malaysian population and derive a regression formula for the estimation of corpse body height using PMCT.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively assessed 107 cadavers that had undergone conventional autopsy and PMCT. We made 5 measurements from the PMCT that included cervical length (CL), thoracic length (TL), lumbosacral length (LS), total column length of the spine, excluding the sacrum and coccyx (TCL), and ellipse line measurement of the whole spine, excluding the sacrum and coccyx (EL). We compared these anthropometric PMCT measurements with AL and correlated them using linear regression analysis.

    RESULTS: The results showed a significant linear relationship existed between TL and LS with AL, which was higher in comparison with the other parameters than the rest of the spine parameters. The linear regression formula derived was: 48.163 + 2.458 (TL) + 2.246 (LS).

    CONCLUSIONS: The linear regression formula derived from PMCT spine length parameters particularly thoracic and lumbar spine gave a finer correlation with autopsy body length and can be used for accurate estimation of cadaveric height. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first ever linear regression formula for cadaveric height assessment using only post mortem CT spine length measurements.

    Matched MeSH terms: Cadaver*
  20. Das S, Haji Suhaimi F, Abd Latiff A, Pa Pa Hlaing K, Abd Ghafar N, Othman F
    Rom J Morphol Embryol, 2009;50(3):509-11.
    PMID: 19690784
    Peroneus tertius (PT) is a muscle of the anterior compartment of the leg. The PT muscle originates from the anterior surface of the fibula and the interosseous membrane and inserts into the medial side of the dorsal region of the fifth metatarsal bone. During routine dissection, we observed the absence of PT on the left lower limb of a cadaver. Usually, the PT is involved in dorsiflexion and eversion of the foot. In many cases, the absence of PT maybe asymptomatic and it may be incidentally detected during cadaveric dissections or autopsies. The existence of PT may help in the swing phase of bipedal walking. The PT may be used for tendon graft surgeries. The pull of the PT may be responsible for causing stress on the fifth metacarpal and account for all stress fractures in any individual. The absence of the PT may puzzle any transplant and foot surgeons performing graft operations. We as anatomists discuss the clinical implications of the absence of PT.
    Matched MeSH terms: Cadaver
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