Displaying publications 1 - 20 of 37 in total

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  1. Khoo SB
    Int J Nurs Pract, 2009 Dec;15(6):481-8.
    PMID: 19958401 DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-172X.2009.01797.x
    Cancers and related treatments have devastating effects on psychosexual life of patients. This study helps us to understand the cultural perspectives of 50 Asian women diagnosed with cancer. Median age was 50+ years. Median duration of time from diagnosis to interview was 23 months. Thirty-eight per cent stopped sex before illness, 36% stopped sex completely whereas 18% stopped gradually after diagnosis; 8% continued to have sex till time of interview. Overall, 70% were living with spouse but not engaged in sexual intercourse; 31.4% slept in different room, 48.6% slept in the same room but without any form of sexual contact. Thirty-eight per cent believed sexual activity could cause cancer recurrence, and 30% believed cancer could be sexually transmitted. Eighty-two per cent reported acceptance of changes to physical appearance. Approximately 70-86% did not discuss sexuality with their doctor or spouse; 90% agreed doctors should ask about psychosexual issues on a routine basis. Approximately 74.4% reported good cooperation from spouse. Cultural beliefs of Asians pose as barriers to providing and receiving psychosexual affection between women diagnosed with cancer and their spouse. However, these beliefs also serve as protective factors in their mutual acceptance of change in psychosexual activities. Health-care professionals need to be sensitive to the vast cultural differences in psychosexual expressions and needs of women diagnosed with cancer.
    Matched MeSH terms: Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/etiology*
  2. Abdul Latif R, Muhamad R, Kanagasundram S, Sidi H, Nik Jaafar NR, Midin M, et al.
    Asia Pac Psychiatry, 2013 Apr;5 Suppl 1:21-6.
    PMID: 23857833 DOI: 10.1111/appy.12039
    The objective of this study was to examine the risk of female sexual orgasmic disorder among a group of women with hypertension in Malaysia. The associated factors were also examined.
    Matched MeSH terms: Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/etiology*; Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/epidemiology
  3. Tan HM, Tong SF, Ho CC
    J Sex Med, 2012 Mar;9(3):663-71.
    PMID: 22188573 DOI: 10.1111/j.1743-6109.2011.02582.x
    INTRODUCTION: Sexual dysfunction in men, such as erectile dysfunction, hypogonadism, and premature ejaculation, generates considerable attention. Its association with physical and psychological health is an issue which should be addressed seriously.
    AIM: A review of the literature pertaining to the correlation between sexual dysfunction and physical and psychological health.
    METHODS: PubMed search for relevant publications on the association between sexual dysfunction in men and physical and psychological health.
    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Clinical and epidemiological evidence that demonstrates the association between sexual dysfunction in men and physical and psychological health.
    RESULTS: Sexual dysfunction, i.e., erectile dysfunction, hypogonadism, and premature ejaculation, has been shown to be associated with physical and psychological health. There is a strong correlation between sexual dysfunction and cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, quality of life, and depression.
    CONCLUSION: The association between men's sexual dysfunction and physical and psychological health is real and proven. Therefore, it should not be taken lightly but instead treated as a life-threatening medical problem.
    Matched MeSH terms: Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/physiopathology*; Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/psychology*
  4. Roslan NS, Jaafar NRN, Sidi H, Baharudin N, Kumar J, Das S, et al.
    Curr Drug Targets, 2019;20(2):146-157.
    PMID: 28641524 DOI: 10.2174/1389450118666170622090337
    Sexual desire includes complex motivation and drive. In the context of biological and cognitive- emotive state art of science, it is often a neglected field in medicine. In regard to the treatment, study on women's sexual function received less attention compared to the men's sexuality. In the past, this endeavor was relatively not well disseminated in the scientific community. Recently, there was a revolutionized surge of drug targets available to treat women with low sexual desire. It is timely to review the relevant biological approach, especially in the context of pharmacotherapy to understand this interesting clinical entity which was modulated by numerous interactive psychosocial inter-play and factors. The complex inter-play between numerous dimensional factors lends insights to understand the neural mechanism, i.e. the rewards centre pathway and its interaction with external psychosocialstimulus, e.g. relationship or other meaningful life events. The function of hormones, e.g. oxytocin or testosterone regulation was described. The role of neurotransmitters as reflected by the introduction of a molecule of flibenserin, a full agonist of the 5-HT1A and partial agonist of the D4 to treat premenopausal women with low sexual desire was deliberated. Based on this fundamental scientific core knowledge, we suggest an outline on know-how of introduction for sex therapy (i.e. "inner-self" and "outer-self") where the role of partner is narrated. Then, we also highlighted on the use of pharmacological agent as an adjunct scope of therapy, i.e. phosphodiasterase-5 (PDE-5) inhibitors and hormonal treatment in helping the patient with low sexual desire.
    Matched MeSH terms: Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/metabolism; Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/therapy*
  5. Norhayati MN, Azman Yacob M
    Int J Psychiatry Med, 2017 11 08;52(4-6):328-344.
    PMID: 29117756 DOI: 10.1177/0091217417738933
    There was limited knowledge on the sexual function in women who have survived severe obstetric complications. The aim of this study was to compare the level of sexual functioning among women with and without severe morbidity at six months postpartum and to identify the factors associated with sexual function scores of women. A prospective double-cohort study design was applied at two tertiary hospitals over a six-month period. Postpartum women with and without severe maternal morbidity were selected as the exposed and the non-exposed group, respectively. The study included 145 exposed and 187 non-exposed women. Those with severe maternal morbidity were significantly ( P Sexual Function Index scores ( P = 0.895) between the two groups. Both groups showed the highest sexual dysfunction in pain and the lowest dysfunction in orgasm. Linear regression analyses showed no association between Female Sexual Function Index scores and sociodemographic characteristics, reproductive history, or quality of life. Sexual function in women with severe maternal morbidity did not differ from that in women without severe maternal morbidity. In-depth qualitative studies of women who have experienced potentially life-threatening conditions may improve the understanding of their sexual function.
    Matched MeSH terms: Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/etiology; Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/psychology*
  6. Kadir ZS, Sidi H, Kumar J, Das S, Midin M, Baharuddin N
    Curr Drug Targets, 2018;19(8):916-926.
    PMID: 28228081 DOI: 10.2174/1389450118666170222153908
    Vaginismus is an involuntary muscle contraction of the outer third of vaginal barrel causing sexual penetration almost impossible. It is generally classified under sexual pain disorder (SPD). In Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 5th edition (DSM-5), it is classified under the new rubric of Genito-Pelvic Pain/Sexual Penetration Disorder. This fear-avoidance condition poses an ongoing significant challenge to the medical and health professionals due to the very demanding needs in health care despite its unpredictable prognosis. The etiology of vaginismus is complex: through multiple biopsycho- social processes, involving bidirectional connections between pelvic-genital (local) and higher mental function (central regulation). It has robust neural and psychological-cognitive loop feedback involvement. The internal neural circuit involves an inter-play of at least two-pathway systems, i.e. both "quick threat assessment" of occipital-limbic-occipital-prefrontal-pelvic-genital; and the chronic pain pathways through the genito-spinothalamic-parietal-pre-frontal system, respectively. In this review, a neurobiology root of vaginismus is deliberated with the central role of an emotional-regulating amygdala, and other neural loop, i.e. hippocampus and neo-cortex in the core psychopathology of fear, disgust, and sexual avoidance. Many therapists view vaginismus as a neglected art-and-science which demands a better and deeper understanding on the clinico-pathological correlation to enhance an effective model for the bio-psycho-social treatment. As vaginismus has a strong presentation in psychopathology, i.e. fear of penetration, phobic avoidance, disgust, and anticipatory anxiety, we highlighted a practical psychiatric approach to the clinical management of vaginismus, based on the current core knowledge in the perspective of neuroscience.
    Matched MeSH terms: Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/physiopathology; Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/psychology
  7. Lechmiannandan S, Panirselvam M, Muninathan P, Hussin N, Rajan R, Sidi H, et al.
    Obes Surg, 2019 05;29(5):1571-1575.
    PMID: 30706310 DOI: 10.1007/s11695-019-03722-w
    INTRODUCTION: Female sexual dysfunction (FSD) among the obese women is often under diagnosed and ignored especially in Malaysia, a nation of conservative multiethnic society. There are only a few studies on FSD resolution post-bariatric surgery. The objective was to identify the rate and resolution or improvement of FSD, among obese multiethnic Malaysian women post-bariatric surgery.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: This is a prospective study of women undergoing bariatric surgery, between May 2017 and April 2018. FSD was diagnosed using the Malay version of Female Sexual Function Index (MVFSFI) questionnaire. Patients filled up the questionnaire before and 6 months after surgery. Association between BMI reduction and FSFI score improvement was measured using Fisher's exact test. Outcomes between types of surgery (sleeve gastrectomy and gastric bypass) was compared.

    RESULTS: Fifty-two women completed the study. The mean age was 38.77 ± 6.7. There were 44 (84.6%) Malay patients, 7 (13.5%) Indian patients, and 1 (1.9%) Chinese patient. There was a significant reduction in mean BMI, 39.89 ± 6.9 pre-surgery to 30.32 ± 5.4 post-surgery (p value sexual domains and should be considered as a management option in this group of women.

    Matched MeSH terms: Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/complications; Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/physiopathology; Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/psychology; Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/surgery*
  8. Lim R, Liong ML, Leong WS, Khan NA, Yuen KH
    J Urol, 2016 07;196(1):153-8.
    PMID: 26812304 DOI: 10.1016/j.juro.2016.01.090
    PURPOSE: Studies of the effects of stress urinary incontinence on the sexual function of couples are scarce. We prospectively evaluated couple sexual function and the relationship between sexual function and quality of life. We also compared quality of life in females with vs without stress urinary incontinence.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sexually active females at least 21 years old with or without stress urinary incontinence and their partners were recruited for study. To assess sexual function the couples completed GRISS (Golombok Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction) and a 1-item question on overall sexual experience, "Over the past 4 weeks, how satisfied have you been with your overall sexual life?" Additionally, females completed ICIQ-LUTSqol (International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Quality of Life) to assess quality of life.

    RESULTS: For sexual function assessment 66 of 134 couples with (49.3%) and 95 of 176 without (54.0%) stress urinary incontinence were recruited. Females with stress urinary incontinence had lower overall sexual function, lower frequency of sexual intercourse, less satisfaction (each p <0.001) and higher avoidance behavior (p = 0.026). Partners of females with stress urinary incontinence had more problems with erectile dysfunction (p = 0.027), less satisfaction (p = 0.006) and lower frequency of sexual intercourse (p = 0.001) but no difference in overall GRISS score (p = 0.093). Couples with stress urinary incontinence had poorer overall sexual experience (p <0.05). Females with stress urinary incontinence had poorer quality of life than those without stress urinary incontinence (120 of 134, response rate 89.6% vs 145 of 176, response rate 82.4%, p <0.001). Sexual function and quality of life did not significantly correlate (r = 0.001, p = 0.997).

    CONCLUSIONS: Stress urinary incontinence in females is negatively associated not only with female quality of life and sexual function but also with partner sexual function.

    Matched MeSH terms: Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/etiology*; Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/epidemiology
  9. Grewal GS, Gill JS, Sidi H, Gurpreet K, Jambunathan ST, Suffee NJ
    Asia Pac Psychiatry, 2013 Apr;5 Suppl 1:14-20.
    PMID: 23857832 DOI: 10.1111/appy.12037
    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors for female sexual desire disorder (FSDD) among healthcare personnel at selected healthcare facilities in Malaysia.
    METHODS: Two hundred and one female healthcare workers from three large tertiary hospitals were selected by stratified random sampling to participate in this cross-sectional study. Validated questionnaires were used to assess depression, anxiety, and sexual function in women and erectile dysfunction (ED) in their partners.
    RESULTS: The prevalence of FSDD was 18.9%. Women with low sexual desire were more likely to have higher educational attainment (OR = 3.06; 95% CI; 1.22-7.66), lower frequency of sexual intercourse (OR = 12.81; 95% CI; 4.43-37.83), two or more children (OR = 3.05; 95% CI; 1.02-9.09), duration of marriage of 20 years or more (OR = 2.62; 95% CI; 1.27-5.40), and a spouse with ED (OR = 2.86; 95% CI; 1.08-7.56).
    DISCUSSION: FSDD is common among female healthcare personnel in Malaysia, affecting nearly one in five women. The implication of low sexual desire is important in terms of contributing to a meaningful sexual relationship, and indirectly affects the quality of life of the healthcare personnel.
    KEYWORDS: Malaysia; healthcare personnel; prevalence; risk factor; sexual desire disorder
    Matched MeSH terms: Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/etiology; Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/epidemiology*
  10. Sidi H, Midin M, Puteh SE, Abdullah N
    Asia Pac J Public Health, 2008;20(4):298-306.
    PMID: 19124324 DOI: 10.1177/1010539508322810
    AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of orgasmic dysfunction and the potential risk factors that may be associated with orgasmic dysfunction among women at a primary care setting in Malaysia.
    METHODS: A validated questionnaire for sexual function was used to assess orgasmic function. A total of 230 married women aged 18 to 70 years participated in this study. Their sociodemographic and marital profiles were compared between those who had orgasmic dysfunction and those who did not, and the risk factors were examined.
    RESULTS: The prevalence of orgasmic dysfunction in the primary care population was 51.9%. Women with orgasmic dysfunction were found to be significantly higher in the following groups: age >45 years, being non-Malay, having lower academic status, married longer, having more children, married to an older husband, and being at menopausal state.
    CONCLUSION: Women with infrequent sexual intercourse are less likely to be orgasmic (odds ratio = 0.29, 95% confidence interval = 0.11-0.74).
    Matched MeSH terms: Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/ethnology*; Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/prevention & control
  11. Lai PS, Tan SY, Liew SM
    Arch Sex Behav, 2016 Nov;45(8):2081-2089.
    PMID: 27502351 DOI: 10.1007/s10508-016-0796-1
    Sociocultural factors have been shown to be important influencers of sexual health and sexuality. Hence, the aim of our study was to explore the views and experiences of family medicine trainees regarding female sexual dysfunction (FSD) with a focus on the barriers and facilitators towards the initiation of conversation on this topic. A qualitative study design involving semi-structured focus group discussions (FGDs) was conducted with 19 family medicine trainees in Malaysia. The conceptual framework used was based on the Theory of Planned Behavior. Thematic approach was used to analyze the data. Participants perceived FSD as being uncommon and unimportant. According to our participants, patients often presented with indirect complaints, and doctors were not proactive in asking about FSD. Three main barriers were identified: doctor factors, perceived patient factors, and system factors. Lack of confidence, knowledge, experience, time, and embarrassment were the key barriers identified at the doctors' level. Lack of awareness, among patients regarding FSD, and local cultural and religious norms were the perceived patient barriers. System barriers were lack of time and privacy. Various facilitators, such as continuous medical education and public forums, were suggested as means to encourage family medicine trainees to initiate discussion on sexual matters during consultations. In conclusion, family medicine trainees found it difficult to initiate conversation on FSD with patients. Interventions to encourage conversation on FSD should target this and other identified barriers.
    Matched MeSH terms: Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/diagnosis; Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/psychology
  12. Dashti S, Latiff LA, Hamid HA, Sani SM, Akhtari-Zavare M, Abu Bakar AS, et al.
    Asian Pac. J. Cancer Prev., 2016;17(8):3747-51.
    PMID: 27644611
    BACKGROUND: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a combination of chronic anovulation, obesity, and hyperandrogenism and can affect sexual function in women of reproductive age. It is also associated with endometrial cancer. Our aim was to evaluate the frequency and predisposing factors of sexual dysfunction in PCOS patients.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, 16 married women with a definite diagnosis of PCOS were recruited. Sexual function was assessed in the domains of desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction and pain using the female sexual function index (FSFI) questionnaire. Patients were also assessed for mental health using the depression, anxiety and stress (DASS-21) questionnaire. Presence of hirsutism was assessed using the Ferriman-Gallwey (FG) scoring system. Demographic data were obtained from patients during in-person interview.

    RESULTS: Sexual dysfunction was present in 62.5% of patients with the domains of arousal and lubrication particularly affected (93.8% and 87.5%, respectively). Patients with symptoms of depression and anxiety were significantly more likely to suffer sexual dysfunction than those without these symptoms (p=0.04 and p=0.03 respectively). Patients with stress symptoms reported higher orgasm dysfunction than those without (p=0.02). No significant difference in any of the FSFI score domains was observed between patients with and without hirsutism.

    CONCLUSIONS: PCOS patients markedly suffer from sexual dysfunction and therefore it seems appropriate to be screened for intervention. Poor mental health conditions that may be the result of infertility or other complications of PCOS should also be considered as curable causes of sexual dysfunction in these patients.
    Matched MeSH terms: Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/etiology*; Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/psychology*
  13. Midi M, Kanagasundram S, Sidi H, Asmidar D, Naing L, Guan NC
    Int J Psychiatry Med, 2012;43(4):405-18.
    PMID: 23094470
    To compare the risk of sexual arousal difficulties between two groups of depressed female patients in remission who were treated with either escitalopram or fluoxetine. Associated factors were also examined.
    Matched MeSH terms: Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/chemically induced*; Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/diagnosis; Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/epidemiology
  14. Sidi H, Naing L, Midin M, Nik Jaafar NR
    J Sex Med, 2008 Oct;5(10):2359-66.
    PMID: 18086161
    The concept of a sexual response cycle (SRC) for women has gained interest lately with the reintroduction of terms with new definitions and a new model for the sexual response, especially the Basson's circular model.
    Matched MeSH terms: Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/epidemiology
  15. Sidi H, Abdullah N, Puteh SE, Midin M
    J Sex Med, 2007 Nov;4(6):1642-54.
    PMID: 17608666
    Female sexual dysfunction (FSD) is a prevalent sexual health problem that has been inadequately investigated in Malaysia, a nation with a conservative multiethnic society.
    Matched MeSH terms: Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/diagnosis*
  16. Zahran MH, Fahmy O, El-Hefnawy AS, Ali-El-Dein B
    Climacteric, 2016 Dec;19(6):546-550.
    PMID: 27649461
    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the impact of radical cystectomy and urinary diversion on female sexual function.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: A Medline search was conducted according to the PRISMA statement for all English full-text articles published between 1980 and 2016 and assessing female sexual function post radical cystectomy and urinary diversion. Eligible studies were subjected to critical analysis and revision. The primary outcomes were the reporting methods for female sexual dysfunction (FSD), manifestations of FSD, and factors associated with FSD, postoperative recoverability of FSD, and awareness level regarding FSD.

    RESULTS: From the resulting 117 articles, 11 studies were finally included in our systematic review, with a total of 361 women. Loss of sexual desire and orgasm disorders were the most frequently reported (49% and 39%). Dyspareunia and vaginal lubrication disorders were reported in 25% and 9.5%, respectively. The incidence of sexual dysfunction was 10% in 30 patients receiving genital- or nerve-sparing cystectomy vs. 59% receiving conventional cystectomy.

    CONCLUSION: Although female sexual function is an important predictor of health-related quality of life post radical cystectomy and urinary diversion, the available literature is not enough to provide proper information for surgeons and patients.

    Matched MeSH terms: Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/epidemiology*
  17. Muhamad R, Horey D, Liamputtong P, Low WY
    Arch Sex Behav, 2019 04;48(3):949-960.
    PMID: 30238183 DOI: 10.1007/s10508-018-1236-1
    Recognizing barriers to managing sexual issues makes it more likely that effective ways to overcome them will be found. In Malaysia, where discussion of sexual issues is taboo, sociocultural factors may influence how physicians manage patients with these types of problems. This article focuses on the challenges encountered by 21 Malay family physicians when women experiencing sexual problems and female sexual dysfunction (FSD) attended their clinics, an uncommon occurrence in Malaysia, despite their high prevalence. This qualitative study employed a phenomenological framework and conducted face-to-face in-depth interviews. Three main barriers to managing women with sexual problems were identified that can hinder assessment and treatment: insufficient knowledge and training; unfavorable clinic environments; and personal embarrassment. Some barriers were associated with physician characteristics but many were systemic. These were further evaluated using social cognitive theory. Professional attitudes appear important as those physicians with an interest in managing women's health seemed to make greater effort to explore issues further and work to gain trust. Physicians who appeared indifferent to the impact of FSD showed greater reluctance to find solutions. Systemic issues included unfavorable clinical settings, lack of training, and lack of local evidence. Any strategy to address FSD needs to be underpinned by appropriate policies and resources.
    Matched MeSH terms: Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/psychology*
  18. Yeong CT, Atputharajah V
    Med J Malaysia, 1999 Mar;54(1):79-86.
    PMID: 10972009
    Ignorance is not bliss when it comes to sexuality. Psychosexual problems lead to shame, fumbling, needless fears, low-self esteem and even subfertility. The demands for help appears to be increasing; as the general population become more aware of its presence and the treatment options available through the mass media and better health education. Sex therapy has traditionally been the realm of the psychiatrist but with the gynaecologist as the first contact for most women, the number of women seeking advice directly from their doctors will only increase with time. A total of 243 new cases of sexual dysfunction were treated at the sexual problem clinic in Kandang Kerbau Hospital between January 1994 and November 1996; majority of which were self-referrals (48.5%). The patient pool consisted of more males than females although the clinical setting is in an obstetrics and gynaecology teaching institute. Vaginismus and erectile problems constituted the main complaints. Erectile problems are more common in the patients above 40 years old (p < 0.001). We report here our experience of such a sexual problem clinic and hope to provide insight into this area of medicine from the perspective of a practising gynaecologist.
    Matched MeSH terms: Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/therapy*
  19. Chung CM, Lu MZ, Wong CY, Goh SG, Azhar MI, Lim YM, et al.
    Diabet. Med., 2016 May;33(5):674-80.
    PMID: 26202696 DOI: 10.1111/dme.12864
    AIM: The aim of this study is to construct a new tool for the assessment of sexual dysfunction among men with diabetes that is valid and reliable across different ethnicities, languages and socio-economic backgrounds in South East Asia.

    METHODS: Focus group interviews were conducted to determine the construct of the questionnaire. Content and face validity were assessed by a panel of experts. A pilot study was conducted to validate the Sexual Dysfunction in Asian Men with Diabetes (SAD-MEN) questionnaire in English and Malay. The International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5) was used for comparison. Construct validity was assessed using exploratory factor analysis, reliability was determined using Cronbach's α (> 0.700), and test-retest reliability using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient.

    RESULTS: The SAD-MEN questionnaire yielded moderate face and content validity, with high reliability as shown by Cronbach's α values of 0.949 for sexual performance and 0.775 for sexual desire for the English version. The Malay language questionnaire had a Cronbach's α value of 0.945 for sexual performance and 0.750 for sexual desire. Test-retest reliability using Spearman's test gave correlation coefficients of r = 0.853, P = 0.000 for the English language questionnaire and r = 0.908, P = 0.000 for the Malay language questionnaire.

    CONCLUSION: The SAD-MEN questionnaire is a valid and reliable tool by which to assess sexual dysfunction in English- and Malay-speaking Malaysian and South East Asian men with diabetes.

    Matched MeSH terms: Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/complications; Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/diagnosis*; Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/ethnology; Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/physiopathology
  20. Masiran R, Sidi H, Mohamed Z, Mohd Nazree NE, Nik Jaafar NR, Midin M, et al.
    J Sex Med, 2014 Apr;11(4):1047-1055.
    PMID: 24533444 DOI: 10.1111/jsm.12452
    INTRODUCTION: Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are known for their sexual side effects. Different SSRIs may affect different areas of sexual function at different rates.
    AIMS: The study aimed to determine the prevalence of female sexual dysfunction (FSD), its clinical correlates, and association with 5HT2A (rs6311) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) who were on SSRI therapy.
    METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study on 95 female outpatients with MDD treated with SSRI. The patients were in remission as determined by Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale. Genomic DNA was isolated from buccal swabs and samples were processed using a real time polymerase chain reaction.
    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The presence or absence of FSD as measured by the Malay Version of Female Sexual Function Index and 5HT2A-1438 G/A (rs6311) SNP.
    RESULTS: The overall prevalence of FSD was 32.6%. After controlling for age, number of children, education level, total monthly income, SSRI types, and SSRI dosing, being employed significantly enhanced FSD by 4.5 times (odds ratio [OR] = 4.51; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00, 20.30; P = 0.05). Those having marital problems were 6.7 times more likely to have FSD (OR = 6.67; 95% CI 1.57, 28.34). 5HT2A-1438 G/A (rs6311) SNP was not significantly associated with FSD.
    CONCLUSION: There was no significant association between FSD and the 5HT2A (rs6311) SNP in patients with MDD on SSRI therapy. Employment status and marital state were significantly associated with FSD among these patients.
    Study site: Psychiatry clinics, Pusat Perubatan Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (PPUKM), University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC), Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
    Matched MeSH terms: Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/genetics; Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/psychology*
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