Displaying publications 21 - 40 of 58 in total

Abstract:
Sort:
  1. Connolly R, Prendiville R, Cusack D, Flaherty G
    J Travel Med, 2017 Mar 01;24(2).
    PMID: 28395093 DOI: 10.1093/jtm/taw082
    Background: Death during international travel and the repatriation of human remains to one's home country is a distressing and expensive process. Much organization is required involving close liaison between various agencies.

    Methods: A review of the literature was conducted using the PubMed database. Search terms included: 'repatriation of remains', 'death', 'abroad', 'tourism', 'travel', 'travellers', 'travelling' and 'repatriation'. Additional articles were obtained from grey literature sources and reference lists.

    Results: The local national embassy, travel insurance broker and tour operator are important sources of information to facilitate the repatriation of the deceased traveller. Formal identification of the deceased's remains is required and a funeral director must be appointed. Following this, the coroner in the country or jurisdiction receiving the repatriated remains will require a number of documents prior to providing clearance for burial. Costs involved in repatriating remains must be borne by the family of the deceased although travel insurance may help defray some of the costs. If the death is secondary to an infectious disease, cremation at the site of death is preferred. No standardized procedure is in place to deal with the remains of a migrant's body at present and these remains are often not repatriated to their country of origin.

    Conclusions: Repatriation of human remains is a difficult task which is emotionally challenging for the bereaving family and friends. As a travel medicine practitioner, it is prudent to discuss all eventualities, including the risk of death, during the pre-travel consultation. Awareness of the procedures involved in this process may ease the burden on the grieving family at a difficult time.

  2. Flaherty GT, Caumes E
    J Travel Med, 2018 01 01;25(1).
    PMID: 29635642 DOI: 10.1093/jtm/tay019
    Background: Traumatic deaths, and more particularly suicides, during international travel receive a disproportionately low level of attention in the travel medicine literature. We describe the demographic profile of international travellers whose death occurred at the Cliffs of Moher along the Atlantic seaboard in Ireland.

    Methods: Coroners' files for the 25 years between 1993 and 2017 were interrogated. All cases of death on or at the cliffs were examined, and demographic data were extracted, including date of death, gender, age, nationality, whether the victims were alone at the cliffs prior to their death, whether the fall was witnessed, prevailing weather conditions, post-mortem examinations, toxicology reports and inquest verdicts.

    Results: Overall, 66 deaths occurred on or at the base of the Cliffs of Moher during the period 1993 through August 2017. In total, 18 (27.3%) of the victims were international visitors to Ireland, including 11 males (61.1%). The mean age of travellers (n = 17) was 34.2 years. Victims were nationals of 12 different countries, with 13 being European nationals. Most deaths occurred in summer (n = 7) or spring (n = 6), with eight deaths (44%) reported at weekends. In total, 15 victims (83.3%) had walked along the cliff path alone. A jump or fall from the cliffs was witnessed in only two cases (11.1%). Post-mortem examinations revealed multiple traumatic injuries consistent with a fall from a height. Four cases had evidence of alcohol intoxication. Suicide or open verdicts were returned in 50% (n = 9) of the cases.

    Conclusions: Travelling alone to the site, purchasing one-way tickets, or depositing belongings on the clifftop support the possibility of suicidal intent, while being intoxicated could be a co-factor in suicidal jumps or support the possibility of an accidental fall. This knowledge could help to identify travellers at the greatest risk of death at cliffs.

  3. Flaherty GT, Rossanese A, Steffen R, Torresi J
    J Travel Med, 2018 01 01;25(1).
    PMID: 30239856 DOI: 10.1093/jtm/tay088
  4. Townsend CJ, Loughlin JM
    J Travel Med, 1998 Dec;5(4):226-7.
    PMID: 9876202
    Missionaries are well known to suffer the effects of stress. Patricia Miersma relates missionary stress to combat related stress. 1 Development workers too are known to be at increased risk of death whilst overseas-mostly due to traumatic incidents. Relief workers voluntarily enter high stress situations. These overseas workers are at real risk of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). The issue of Critical Incident Stress Debriefing (CISD, or Psychological Debriefing) has been critically examined in an editorial in the British Medical Journal.3 The first randomized, controlled study of CISD that we are aware of (for motor vehicle accident survivors) was published in 1996.4 With 54 intervention subjects, it did not demonstrate effectiveness.
  5. Barrett JP, Behrens RH
    J Travel Med, 1996 Mar 01;3(1):60-61.
    PMID: 9815425
    Chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium vivax was originally reported in Papua, New Guinea by Reickman in 1989.1 In the same year, in Colombia, South America, Arias and Corredor2 reported relapses of 11 patients suffering from vivax malaria, following a chloroquine-primaquine regimen. Garavelli and Corti3 suggested chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium vivax may be present in Brazil following these therapeutic relapses. Further therapeutic failures in returned travelers from South America were reported by Moore et al (1994).4 We report vivax malaria in a group of expeditioners visiting Guyana who, whereas compliant with antimalarial chemoprophylaxis, developed clinical malaria, adding evidence to the presence of chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium vivax in South America. Raleigh International is a youth development charity that undertakes environmental and community projects around the world. These are usually in remote locations. Nine expeditions in countries such as Chile, Belize, Zimbabwe, Uganda, and Malaysia are organized annually. A project manager and a medical officer are placed at each site, along with approximately 10 venturers (age 17-25.) Participants are of all nationalities, but, at present, they are predominantly British.
  6. Kositprapa C, Wimalratna O, Chomchey P, Chareonwai S, Benjavongkulchai M, Khawplod P, et al.
    J Travel Med, 1998 Mar;5(1):30-2.
    PMID: 9772313
    Rabies is still a major public health problem in Asia. The incidence of known annual human cases in India alone has recently been revised from 20,000 to 30,000, and over 500,000 patients are given some form of postexposure rabies treatment. Only China, Peninsular Malaysia, Singapore, and Thailand are reporting a significant decrease in the prevalence of this disease in humans. Over 150,000 courses of postexposure treatment (PET) are given in Thailand every year. To determine remaining barriers to further reduction of the number of human rabies deaths, we carried out a questionnaire study of government hospitals throughout the Kingdom.
  7. Flaherty GT, Maxemous KK, Nossier RE, Bui YG
    J Travel Med, 2017 Sep 01;24(6).
    PMID: 29088481 DOI: 10.1093/jtm/tax068
  8. Flaherty GT, Chen B, Avalos G
    J Travel Med, 2017 Sep 01;24(6).
    PMID: 28922821 DOI: 10.1093/jtm/tax059
    The purpose of this study was to examine the principal travel health priorities of travellers. The most frequently selected travel health concerns were accessing medical care abroad, dying abroad, insect bites, malaria, personal safety and travel security threats. The travel health risks of least concern were culture shock, fear of flying, jet lag and sexually transmitted infections. This study is the first to develop a hierarchy of self-declared travel health risk priorities among travellers.
  9. Flaherty GT, Lim Yap K
    J Travel Med, 2017 Sep 01;24(5).
    PMID: 28498914 DOI: 10.1093/jtm/tax024
    Evidence-based travel medicine requires that research priorities reflect the wide knowledge base of this discipline. Bibliometric analysis of articles published in Journal of Travel Medicine yielded the following results: epidemiology (6%, n = 105); immunology/vaccinology (8.5%, n = 148); pre-travel assessment/consultation (30.5%, n = 533); diseases contracted during travel (48.3%, n = 843); other clinical conditions associated with travel (6.8%, n = 119); post-travel assessment (5.2%, n = 91) and administrative and general travel medicine issues (6%, n = 105).
Filters
Contact Us

Please provide feedback to Administrator (tengcl@gmail.com)

External Links