Displaying all 9 publications

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  1. Timsina S, K C B, Adhikari D, Alrasheedy AA, Mohamed Ibrahim MI, Kaundinnyayana A
    PMID: 28811395 DOI: 10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.18
    Community pharmacies in Nepal and other South Asian countries are in a mediocre state due to poor regulation and the fact that many pharmacies are run by people with insufficient training in dispensing. This has led to the inappropriate use of medicines. The problems due to poor regulation and the mediocre state of community pharmacies in South Asia encompass both academia and clinical practice. In this paper, a 2-week community pharmacy internship programme completed by 2 graduating pharmacy students of Pokhara University (a Nepalese public university) at Sankalpa Pharmacy, Pokhara, Nepal is illustrated. During the internship, they were systematically trained on store management, pharmaceutical care, counselling skills, the use of medical devices, pharmaceutical business plans, medicine information sources, and adverse drug reaction reporting. An orientation, observations and hands-on training, case presentation, discussion, and feedback from 2 senior pharmacists were used as the training method. A proper community pharmacy internship format, good pharmacy practice standards, and a better work environment for pharmacists may improve the quality of community pharmacies.
    Matched MeSH terms: Community Pharmacy Services/organization & administration*
  2. Inoue Y, Takikawa M, Morita Y, Takao K, Kanamoto I, Sugibayashi K
    Res Social Adm Pharm, 2016 Mar-Apr;12(2):347-54.
    PMID: 26072001 DOI: 10.1016/j.sapharm.2015.05.005
    In recent years, several developed countries reported on new multidisciplinary roles of pharmacists and pharmacy assistants, especially considering the former's expanding functions. This paper examines differences in pharmacists' and pharmacy assistants' professional roles and the dispensing system in Japan with those in the United Kingdom, Malaysia, and the Philippines. A review of relevant literature was supplemented by interviews of dispensary staff at hospitals and community pharmacies in Malaysia and the Philippines. The UK, Philippines, and Malaysia had dispensing assistants who performed dispensing roles, while Japan did not. Although pharmacy assistants occasionally performed screening and dispensing inspections due to the lack of pharmacists, it is necessary for pharmacists participating in risk management to ensure formula optimization and monitoring. Pharmacists' contribution to medical care involves ensuring safety in drug therapy and overall medical services. Screening is the most fundamental and important function performed exclusively by pharmacists, thereby establishing their status within the medical system.
    Matched MeSH terms: Community Pharmacy Services/organization & administration
  3. Shafie AA, Hassali MA, Azhar S, See OG
    Res Social Adm Pharm, 2012 May-Jun;8(3):258-62.
    PMID: 21824823 DOI: 10.1016/j.sapharm.2011.06.002
    The role of pharmacists has transformed significantly because of changes in pharmacists' training and population health demands. Within this context, community pharmacists are recognized as important health personnel for the provision of extended health services. Similarly, in Malaysia, the need to transform community pharmacy practice has been discussed by all interested parties; however, the transition has been slow due in part to the nonexistence of a dispensing separation policy between pharmacists and medical doctors in private community practices. For decades, medical doctors in private community practices have had the right to prescribe and dispense, thus diluting the role of community pharmacists because of overlapping roles. This article explores dispensing separation in Malaysia and, by taking into account the needs of health professionals and health care consumers, suggests a mechanism for how dispensing separation practice can be implemented.
    Matched MeSH terms: Community Pharmacy Services/organization & administration*
  4. Ahmad A, Khan MU
    Res Social Adm Pharm, 2016 04 23;12(5):811-2.
    PMID: 27157865 DOI: 10.1016/j.sapharm.2016.04.003
    Matched MeSH terms: Community Pharmacy Services/organization & administration*
  5. Peikari HR, Shah MH, Zakaria MS, Yasin NM, Elhissi A
    Res Social Adm Pharm, 2015 May-Jun;11(3):339-51.
    PMID: 25262599 DOI: 10.1016/j.sapharm.2014.08.011
    The results from past studies about the effects of second-generation e-prescribing systems on community pharmacists' outcomes and practices are inconclusive, and the claims of effectiveness and efficiency of such systems have not been supported in all studies. There is a strong need to study the factors that lead to positive outcomes for the users of these systems.
    Matched MeSH terms: Community Pharmacy Services/organization & administration*
  6. Hatah E, Tordoff J, Duffull SB, Braund R
    Res Social Adm Pharm, 2014 Jan-Feb;10(1):185-94.
    PMID: 23688540 DOI: 10.1016/j.sapharm.2013.04.008
    In New Zealand, pharmacists are funded to provide adherence support to their patients via a service called "Medicines Use Review" (MUR). The service is based on the assumption that the medication regimen is clinically appropriate and therefore does not include a clinical review. However, whether or not pharmacists make clinical recommendations to patients during MUR is unclear.
    Matched MeSH terms: Community Pharmacy Services/organization & administration*
  7. Chong CP, March G, Clark A, Gilbert A, Hassali MA, Bahari MB
    Health Policy, 2011 Feb;99(2):139-48.
    PMID: 20732723 DOI: 10.1016/j.healthpol.2010.08.002
    This study evaluated Australian community pharmacists' rate of generic medicine substitution, patient acceptance of generic substitution and cost-savings achieved for patients from substitution.
    Matched MeSH terms: Community Pharmacy Services/organization & administration*
  8. Lee EL, Wong PS, Tan MY, Sheridan J
    Int J Pharm Pract, 2018 Apr;26(2):138-147.
    PMID: 28574154 DOI: 10.1111/ijpp.12374
    OBJECTIVES: This study explored the experiences and views of individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) on their diabetes self-management and potential roles for community pharmacists in diabetes self-management education and support (DSME/S) in Malaysia.
    METHODS: A qualitative study, using semi-structured, face-to-face interviews, was conducted with patients with T2D attending a primary care health clinic in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed inductively.
    KEY FINDINGS: Fourteen participants with T2D were interviewed. Data were coded into five main themes: experience and perception of diabetes self-management, constraints of the current healthcare system, perception of the community pharmacist and community pharmacies, perceived roles for community pharmacists in diabetes care, and challenges in utilising community pharmacies to provide DSME/S. There were misconceptions about diabetes management that may be attributed to a lack of knowledge. Although participants described potential roles for community pharmacists in education, medication review and continuity of care, these roles were mostly non-clinically oriented. Participants were not confident about community pharmacists making recommendations and changes to the prescribed treatment regimens. While participants recognised the advantages of convenience of a community pharmacy-based diabetes care service, they raised concerns over the retail nature and the community pharmacy environment for providing such services.
    CONCLUSION: This study highlighted the need to improve the care provision for people with T2D. Participants with T2D identified potential, but limited roles for community pharmacists in diabetes care. Participants expressed concerns that need to be addressed if effective diabetes care is to be provided from community pharmacies in Malaysia.
    Study site: primary care health clinic (klinik kesihatan), Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
    Matched MeSH terms: Community Pharmacy Services/organization & administration*
  9. Chong CP, Hassali MA, Bahari MB, Shafie AA
    Health Policy, 2010 Jan;94(1):68-75.
    PMID: 19762106 DOI: 10.1016/j.healthpol.2009.08.011
    This study aims to provide baseline data to support the implementation of generic substitution policy in Malaysia by evaluating the community pharmacists' perceptions and opinions on generic substitution and current substitution practices.
    Matched MeSH terms: Community Pharmacy Services/organization & administration*
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