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  1. Soo YS, Ang AH
    Med J Malaya, 1971 Mar;25(3):168-74.
    PMID: 4253242
  2. Ang AH, Lambeth JT, Soo YS, Ong SC
    Med J Malaya, 1970 Sep;25(1):8-16.
    PMID: 4249503
  3. Toh BH, Sengupta S, Ang AH, White JC, Lau KS
    Ann Rheum Dis, 1973 Mar;32(2):151-6.
    PMID: 4120913 DOI: 10.1136/ard.32.2.151
    In West Malaysia RA appears to be less common than in temperate climates, but more common than in tropical Africa; furthermore, the incidence of gout and SLE is comparable. The clinical manifestations of RA are milder than those seen in more temperate climates. Subcutaneous rheumatoid nodules have not been observed. Positive serological tests for RF are significantly higher than in the general Malaysian population, but still lower than those reported for patients with RA in temperate climates. Of the three main ethnic groups, the highest incidence of positive results is found in the Chinese.
    Study site: Arthritis Clinic, University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur (University Malaya Medical Centre, UMMC, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia)
  4. Punithavathi N, Ong LM, Irfhan Ali HA, Mohd Izmi IA, Dharminy T, Ang AH, et al.
    Med J Malaysia, 2014 Feb;69(1):16-20.
    PMID: 24814623 MyJurnal
    INTRODUCTION: Conventional Chest Physiotherapy (CCPT) remains the mainstay of treatment for sputum mobilization in patients with productive cough such as bronchiectasis and "Chronic Obstructive Airway Disease" (COPD). However CCPT is time consuming requires the assistance of a physiotherapist and limits the independence of the patient. Mechanical percussors which are electrical devices used to provide percussion to the external chest wall might provide autonomy and greater compliance. We compared safety and efficacy of a mechanical chest percusser devised by Formedic Technology with conventional chest percussion.
    METHODS: Twenty patients (mean age 64years) were randomly assigned to receive either CCPT or mechanical percussor on the first day and crossed over by "Latin square randomisation" to alternative treatment for 6 consecutive days and the amount of sputum expectorated was compared by dry and wet weight. Adverse events and willingness to use was assessed by a home diary and a questionnaire.
    RESULTS: There were 13 males and 7 females, eight diagnosed as bronchiectasis and 12 COPD. The mean dry weight of sputum induced by CCPT (0.54g ± 0.32) was significantly more compared with MP (0.40g + 0.11); p-value = 0.002. The mean wet weight of sputum with CCPT (10.71g ± 8.70) was also significantly more compared with MP (5.99g ± 4.5); p-value < 0.001. There were no significant difference in adverse events and majority of patients were willing to use the device by themselves.
    CONCLUSION: The mechanical percussor although produces less sputum is well tolerated and can be a useful adjunct to CCPT.
  5. Kow FP, Adlina B, Sivasangari S, Punithavathi N, Ng KK, Ang AH, et al.
    Med J Malaysia, 2018 08;73(4):233-238.
    PMID: 30121686 MyJurnal
    INTRODUCTION: As pharmacological treatment of hypertension has become a burden worldwide, the study looked into nonpharmacological ways of reducing blood pressure. The objective was to determine if music guided, slow and deep breathing will reduce the blood pressure among patients with hypertension in eight weeks.

    METHODS: A participant blinded, multi-centre, randomised controlled trial was conducted in which the participants in the intervention group (IG) practiced deep breathing exercise guided by sound cues and those in the control group (CG) listened to the music. The primary end point was reduction in blood pressure at eight weeks.

    RESULTS: 87 patients, 46 males and 41 females with mean age of 61.1 years were recruited and 93.1% of them successfully completed the study. There was significant reduction in systolic and diastolic Blood Pressure from baseline by 8 weeks in both groups. The reduction in Mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) in the control arm was 10.5mmHg compared to 8.3mmHg (p<0.001) in intervention group. Diastolic blood pressure (DBP) reduction in control and intervention groups were 5.2 mmHg (p<0.001) and 5.6 mmHg (p<0.001) respectively. The absolute difference in SBP reduction from baseline in IG & CG was -2.2 (95%CI: -7.8 to 3.5) and DBP was -0.4 (95%CI: -2.9 to 3.6). However, blood pressure reduction between the two groups was not significant.

    CONCLUSIONS: Both listening to music and deep breathing exercise were associated with a clinically significant reduction in SBP and DBP. However, deep breathing exercise did not augment the benefit of music in reducing BP.

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