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  1. Mariana A, Ho TM, Heah SK
    PMID: 9280009
    In the present study on the life-cycle of Blomia tropicalis, freshly laid eggs were observed until they developed into adults; the development periods between stages were recorded. The eggs took an average of 22.9 +/- 6.4 days to develop to adults. For longevity experiments, newly emerged adults were kept at 25 degrees C and observed until they died. There was no significant difference in longevities of the different sexes (p = 0.053). Production of eggs by mated females were monitored until egg production stopped and the female died. Mated females and males survived an average of 32.2 +/- 15.4 and 30.9 +/- 17.7 days respectively. The difference in longevity of the mated females, and males was not significant (p = 0.747). Longevity of the mated females was found to be significantly (p < 0.05) shorter than unmated females.
  2. Chew WK, Kurahashi H, Nazni WA, Heo CC, Heah SK, Jeffery J, et al.
    Trop Biomed, 2012 Sep;29(3):489-92.
    PMID: 23018512
    Lispe orientalis Wiedemann, 1824 is recorded for the first time in peninsular Malaysia. Specimens were collected from a mushroom cultivation farm in Genting Highlands, Pahang (3°25'18"N 101°47'48"E). Previously, this species had been recorded from Azerbaijin, India, Russia, Tajikistan, Thailand, Turkey and South Korea. The male of Lispe orientalis can be determined by the following characteristics: body non-metallic, ashy gray, third antennal segment black, R5 cell not narrow apically, hind metatarsus normal, legs entirely black, femora with long bristle-like hairs on av and pv surfaces, hind tibia without av and pv seta and the palpi orangish in colour.
  3. Nazni WA, Jeffery J, Lee HL, Lailatul AM, Chew WK, Heo CC, et al.
    Malays J Pathol, 2011 Jun;33(1):53-6.
    PMID: 21874753 MyJurnal
    A 73-year-old Chinese man was admitted to the Accident and Emergency Premorbid Ward of a local hospital in Malaysia. The patient complained of shortness of breath with cough and was in a semi-conscious state. He was later admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) of the hospital. Six days after admission 5-6 maggots were recoverd from the nasal cavity. The maggots were identified as the third-instar larvae of Lucilia cuprina Wiedmann (Diptera: Calliphoridae) based on the morphological characteristics. This patient was classified as having nosocomial myiasis. The presence of the third instar larvae indicated that the infestation was not more than three to four days. An adult sarcophagid identified as Parasarcophaga ruficornis (Fabricius) caught in the ICU where the patient was warded provided further evidence of the potential for the nosocomial infestation.
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