Affiliations 

  • 1 Oral Medicine Unit, School of Dental Sciences, Universiti Sains Malayia, Kota Bharu, Malaysia
  • 2 Orthodontic Department, College of Dentistry, Jouf University, Sakaka, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
  • 3 Centre for Oral Health Research, School of Dental Sciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK
  • 4 Department of Operative and Preventive Dentistry, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany
  • 5 Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Dental Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kota Bharu, Malaysia
J. Dent. Res., 2019 Dec;98(13):1425-1436.
PMID: 31746684 DOI: 10.1177/0022034519880544

Abstract

Since its inception in 1919, the Journal of Dental Research has continually published high-quality articles that span the breadth of research topics relevant to dentistry, oral surgery, and medicine. As part of the journal's centennial celebration, we conducted an electronic search on Scopus to identify and analyze the top 100 most cited articles from 1919 to 2018. Since Scopus does not capture older citations, we conducted an additional analysis by Google Scholar to identify key articles published in the first 50 y of the journal. Based on Scopus, the articles were ranked in descending order per their citation counts. The citation counts of the 100 most cited articles varied from 262 to 1,503. The year in which the largest number of top 100 articles were published was 2004 (n = 6). Within the top 100, the majority of articles originated from the United States (n = 52). Research Reports-Biomaterials & Bioengineering was the most frequent category of cited articles (n = 35). There was no significant association between total citation count and time since publication (correlation coefficient = -0.051, P = 0.656). However, there was a significant negative association of citation density (correlation coefficient = -0.610, P < 0.01) with time since publication. Our analyses demonstrate the broad reach of the journal and the dynamics in citation patterns and research agenda over its 100-y history. There is considerable evidence of the high variance in research output, when measured via citations, across the globe. Moreover, it remains unclear how patients' priorities and dental health care needs are aligned with the perceived influence of single research pieces identified by our search. Our findings may help to inspire future research in tackling these inequalities and highlight the need for conceptualizing research priorities.

* Title and MeSH Headings from MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.