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  1. Hazmi AJ, Zuki AB, Noordin MM, Jalila A, Norimah Y
    Med J Malaysia, 2008 Jul;63 Suppl A:93-4.
    PMID: 19025000
    This study was conducted based on the hypothesis that mineral and physicochemical properties of cockle shells similarly resemble the properties of corals (Porites sp.). Hence, the mineral and physicochemical evaluations of cockle shells were conducted to support the aforementioned hypothesis. The results indicated that cockle shells and coral exoskeleton shared similar mineral and physicochemical properties.
  2. Fadilah A, Zuki AB, Loqman MY, Zamri-Saad M, Norimah Y, Asnah H
    Med J Malaysia, 2004 May;59 Suppl B:178-9.
    PMID: 15468876
    The study was carried out to evaluate macroscopically the ability of coral to repair a large size bone defect. A total 12 adult, male sheep were used in the study. The large bone defect (2.5cm x 0.5cm x 0.5cm) was created surgically on the left proximal femur and replaced by a block of coral (Porites sp.). Radiographs were obtained immediately after surgery and at 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks post-implantation. Ultrasonographic examinations were carried out every 2 weeks after implantation up to 12 weeks using ultrasound machine (TOSHIBA Capasee II) connected with 7MHz frequency transducer. The sheep were euthanased at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks post-implantation and the bone examined grossly. Both ultrasonographs and radiographs taken at 8 and 12 weeks showed that the implants had been resorbed and left the space that much reduced in size. There was no sign of implant rejection observed in all animals. The results showed that processed coral has potential to become bone substitute for reconstructive bone surgery.
  3. Zuki AB, Hafeez YM, Loqman MY, Noordin MM, Norimah Y
    Anat Histol Embryol, 2007 Oct;36(5):349-56.
    PMID: 17845224
    This study investigates the effect of preservation methods on the performance of bovine parietal pericardium grafts in a rat model. Mid-ventral full thickness abdominal wall defects of 3 x 2.5 cm in size were created in 90 male Sprague-Dawley rats (300-400 g), which were divided into three groups of 30 rats each. The abdominal defects of group one and two were repaired with lyophilized and glycerolized bovine pericardium grafts, while the defects of group three were repaired with expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) Mycro Mesh as a positive control. Another group of 30 rats underwent sham operation and was used for comparison as negative control. Each group of rats (n = 30) was divided into five subgroups (n = 6) and killed at 1, 3, 6, 9 and 18 weeks post-surgery for gross and morphological evaluations. The rats tolerated the surgical procedure well with a total mortality of 0.05%. No serious post-operative clinical complications or signs of rejection were encountered. Adhesions between the grafts and the underlying visceral organs observed in the study were mostly results of post-surgical complications. Glycerol preservation delayed degradation and replacement of the grafts, whereas lyophilization caused early resorption and replacement of the grafts. The glycerolized grafts were replaced with thick dense fibrous tissue, and the lyophilized grafts were replaced with thin loose fibrous tissue. The healing characteristic of the bovine pericardium grafts was similar to those of the sham-operated group, and quite different from those of the ePTFE Mycro Mesh. The outcome of the present study confirmed the superiority of glycerolized bovine pericardium grafts over its lyophilized counter part.
  4. Fadilah A, Zuki AB, Loqman MY, Zamri-Saad M, Al-Salihi KA, Norimah Y, et al.
    Med J Malaysia, 2004 May;59 Suppl B:127-8.
    PMID: 15468851
    The study was carried out with the aim to evaluate natural coral (Porites spp.) implanted in sheep femur microscopically. Twelve adult, male sheep were used in this study. The defect area was implanted with coral and monitored for up to 12 weeks. The sheep were euthanased at 2,4,8, and 12 weeks post-implantation. Microscopically, natural coral implanted into bone tissue have shown gradual resorption and progressively replaced by new bone. At 12 weeks post-implantation, the implanted site was almost completely surrounded by mature bone. The results showed that natural coral was found to be a biodegradable and osteo-conductive biomaterial, which acted as a scaffold for a direct osteoblastic apposition.
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