Displaying publications 1 - 20 of 72 in total

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  1. Yap KP, Gan HM, Teh CS, Chai LC, Thong KL
    BMC Genomics, 2014;15:1007.
    PMID: 25412680 DOI: 10.1186/1471-2164-15-1007
    Typhoid fever is an infectious disease of global importance that is caused by Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi). This disease causes an estimated 200,000 deaths per year and remains a serious global health threat. S. Typhi is strictly a human pathogen, and some recovered individuals become long-term carriers who continue to shed the bacteria in their faeces, thus becoming main reservoirs of infection.
  2. Md-Mustafa ND, Khalid N, Gao H, Peng Z, Alimin MF, Bujang N, et al.
    BMC Genomics, 2014;15:984.
    PMID: 25407215 DOI: 10.1186/1471-2164-15-984
    Panduratin A extracted from Boesenbergia rotunda is a flavonoid reported to possess a range of medicinal indications which include anti-dengue, anti-HIV, anti-cancer, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Boesenbergia rotunda is a plant from the Zingiberaceae family commonly used as a food ingredient and traditional medicine in Southeast Asia and China. Reports on the health benefits of secondary metabolites extracted from Boesenbergia rotunda over the last few years has resulted in rising demands for panduratin A. However large scale extraction has been hindered by the naturally low abundance of the compound and limited knowledge of its biosynthetic pathway.
  3. Yap HY, Chooi YH, Firdaus-Raih M, Fung SY, Ng ST, Tan CS, et al.
    BMC Genomics, 2014;15:635.
    PMID: 25073817 DOI: 10.1186/1471-2164-15-635
    The sclerotium of Lignosus rhinocerotis (Cooke) Ryvarden or Tiger milk mushroom (Polyporales, Basidiomycota) is a valuable folk medicine for indigenous peoples in Southeast Asia. Despite the increasing interest in this ethnobotanical mushroom, very little is known about the molecular and genetic basis of its medicinal and nutraceutical properties.
  4. Ling KH, Hewitt CA, Tan KL, Cheah PS, Vidyadaran S, Lai MI, et al.
    BMC Genomics, 2014;15:624.
    PMID: 25052193 DOI: 10.1186/1471-2164-15-624
    The Ts1Cje mouse model of Down syndrome (DS) has partial triplication of mouse chromosome 16 (MMU16), which is partially homologous to human chromosome 21. These mice develop various neuropathological features identified in DS individuals. We analysed the effect of partial triplication of the MMU16 segment on global gene expression in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and hippocampus of Ts1Cje mice at 4 time-points: postnatal day (P)1, P15, P30 and P84.
  5. Choo SW, Ang MY, Fouladi H, Tan SY, Siow CC, Mutha NV, et al.
    BMC Genomics, 2014;15:600.
    PMID: 25030426 DOI: 10.1186/1471-2164-15-600
    Helicobacter is a genus of Gram-negative bacteria, possessing a characteristic helical shape that has been associated with a wide spectrum of human diseases. Although much research has been done on Helicobacter and many genomes have been sequenced, currently there is no specialized Helicobacter genomic resource and analysis platform to facilitate analysis of these genomes. With the increasing number of Helicobacter genomes being sequenced, comparative genomic analysis on members of this species will provide further insights on their taxonomy, phylogeny, pathogenicity and other information that may contribute to better management of diseases caused by Helicobacter pathogens.
  6. Liu X, Saw WY, Ali M, Ong RT, Teo YY
    BMC Genomics, 2014;15:332.
    PMID: 24885517 DOI: 10.1186/1471-2164-15-332
    The HUGO Pan-Asian SNP Consortium (PASNP) has generated a genetic resource of almost 55,000 autosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across more than 1,800 individuals from 73 urban and indigenous populations in Asia. This has offered valuable insights into the correlation between the genetic ancestry of these populations with major linguistic systems and geography. Here, we attempt to understand whether adaptation to local climate, diet and environment partly explains the genetic variation present in these populations by investigating the genomic signatures of positive selection.
  7. Ting NC, Jansen J, Mayes S, Massawe F, Sambanthamurthi R, Ooi LC, et al.
    BMC Genomics, 2014;15:309.
    PMID: 24767304 DOI: 10.1186/1471-2164-15-309
    Oil palm is an important perennial oil crop with an extremely long selection cycle of 10 to 12 years. As such, any tool that speeds up its genetic improvement process, such as marker-assisted breeding is invaluable. Previously, genetic linkage maps based on AFLP, RFLP and SSR markers were developed and QTLs for fatty acid composition and yield components identified. High density genetic maps of crosses of different genetic backgrounds are indispensable tools for investigating oil palm genetics. They are also useful for comparative mapping analyses to identify markers closely linked to traits of interest.
  8. Tan JL, Khang TF, Ngeow YF, Choo SW
    BMC Genomics, 2013;14:879.
    PMID: 24330254 DOI: 10.1186/1471-2164-14-879
    Mycobacterium abscessus is a rapidly growing mycobacterium that is often associated with human infections. The taxonomy of this species has undergone several revisions and is still being debated. In this study, we sequenced the genomes of 12 M. abscessus strains and used phylogenomic analysis to perform subspecies classification.
  9. Gan HM, Hudson AO, Rahman AY, Chan KG, Savka MA
    BMC Genomics, 2013;14:431.
    PMID: 23809012 DOI: 10.1186/1471-2164-14-431
    Bacteria belonging to the genus Novosphingobium are known to be metabolically versatile and occupy different ecological niches. In the absence of genomic data and/or analysis, knowledge of the bacteria that belong to this genus is currently limited to biochemical characteristics. In this study, we analyzed the whole genome sequencing data of six bacteria in the Novosphingobium genus and provide evidence to show the presence of genes that are associated with salt tolerance, cell-cell signaling and aromatic compound biodegradation phenotypes. Additionally, we show the taxonomic relationship between the sequenced bacteria based on phylogenomic analysis, average amino acid identity (AAI) and genomic signatures.
  10. Chieng S, Carreto L, Nathan S
    BMC Genomics, 2012;13:328.
    PMID: 22823543 DOI: 10.1186/1471-2164-13-328
    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a facultative intracellular pathogen of phagocytic and non-phagocytic cells. How the bacterium interacts with host macrophage cells is still not well understood and is critical to appreciate the strategies used by this bacterium to survive and how intracellular survival leads to disease manifestation.
  11. Schönbach C, Tan TW, Kelso J, Rost B, Nathan S, Ranganathan S
    BMC Genomics, 2011 Nov 30;12 Suppl 3:S1.
    PMID: 22369160 DOI: 10.1186/1471-2164-12-S3-S1
    In 2009 the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB) started to roll out regional bioinformatics conferences in Africa, Latin America and Asia. The open and competitive bid for the first meeting in Asia (ISCB-Asia) was awarded to Asia-Pacific Bioinformatics Network (APBioNet) which has been running the International Conference on Bioinformatics (InCoB) in the Asia-Pacific region since 2002. InCoB/ISCB-Asia 2011 is held from November 30 to December 2, 2011 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Of 104 manuscripts submitted to BMC Genomics and BMC Bioinformatics conference supplements, 49 (47.1%) were accepted. The strong showing of Asia among submissions (82.7%) and acceptances (81.6%) signals the success of this tenth InCoB anniversary meeting, and bodes well for the future of ISCB-Asia.
  12. Ong SS, Wickneswari R
    BMC Genomics, 2011 Nov 30;12 Suppl 3:S13.
    PMID: 22369296 DOI: 10.1186/1471-2164-12-S3-S13
    Lignin, after cellulose, is the second most abundant biopolymer accounting for approximately 15-35% of the dry weight of wood. As an important component during wood formation, lignin is indispensable for plant structure and defense. However, it is an undesirable component in the pulp and paper industry. Removal of lignin from cellulose is costly and environmentally hazardous process. Tremendous efforts have been devoted to understand the role of enzymes and genes in controlling the amount and composition of lignin to be deposited in the cell wall. However, studies on the impact of downregulation and overexpression of monolignol biosynthesis genes in model species on lignin content, plant fitness and viability have been inconsistent. Recently, non-coding RNAs have been discovered to play an important role in regulating the entire monolignol biosynthesis pathway. As small RNAs have critical functions in various biological process during wood formation, small RNA profiling is an important tool for the identification of complete set of differentially expressed small RNAs between low lignin and high lignin secondary xylem.
  13. Lim LS, Tay YL, Alias H, Wan KL, Dear PH
    BMC Genomics, 2012;13:389.
    PMID: 22889016 DOI: 10.1186/1471-2164-13-389
    Eimeria is a genus of parasites in the same phylum (Apicomplexa) as human parasites such as Toxoplasma, Cryptosporidium and the malaria parasite Plasmodium. As an apicomplexan whose life-cycle involves a single host, Eimeria is a convenient model for understanding this group of organisms. Although the genomes of the Apicomplexa are diverse, that of Eimeria is unique in being composed of large alternating blocks of sequence with very different characteristics - an arrangement seen in no other organism. This arrangement has impeded efforts to fully sequence the genome of Eimeria, which remains the last of the major apicomplexans to be fully analyzed. In order to increase the value of the genome sequence data and aid in the effort to gain a better understanding of the Eimeria tenella genome, we constructed a whole genome map for the parasite.
  14. Leow SS, Sekaran SD, Sundram K, Tan Y, Sambanthamurthi R
    BMC Genomics, 2011;12:432.
    PMID: 21864415 DOI: 10.1186/1471-2164-12-432
    Plant phenolics are important nutritional antioxidants which could aid in overcoming chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancer, two leading causes of death in the world. The oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) is a rich source of water-soluble phenolics which have high antioxidant activities. This study aimed to identify the in vivo effects and molecular mechanisms involved in the biological activities of oil palm phenolics (OPP) during healthy states via microarray gene expression profiling, using mice supplemented with a normal diet as biological models.
  15. Amiruddin N, Lee XW, Blake DP, Suzuki Y, Tay YL, Lim LS, et al.
    BMC Genomics, 2012 Jan 13;13:21.
    PMID: 22244352 DOI: 10.1186/1471-2164-13-21
    BACKGROUND: Eimeria tenella is an apicomplexan parasite that causes coccidiosis in the domestic fowl. Infection with this parasite is diagnosed frequently in intensively reared poultry and its control is usually accorded a high priority, especially in chickens raised for meat. Prophylactic chemotherapy has been the primary method used for the control of coccidiosis. However, drug efficacy can be compromised by drug-resistant parasites and the lack of new drugs highlights demands for alternative control strategies including vaccination. In the long term, sustainable control of coccidiosis will most likely be achieved through integrated drug and vaccination programmes. Characterisation of the E. tenella transcriptome may provide a better understanding of the biology of the parasite and aid in the development of a more effective control for coccidiosis.

    RESULTS: More than 15,000 partial sequences were generated from the 5' and 3' ends of clones randomly selected from an E. tenella second generation merozoite full-length cDNA library. Clustering of these sequences produced 1,529 unique transcripts (UTs). Based on the transcript assembly and subsequently primer walking, 433 full-length cDNA sequences were successfully generated. These sequences varied in length, ranging from 441 bp to 3,083 bp, with an average size of 1,647 bp. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) analysis identified CAG as the most abundant trinucleotide motif, while codon usage analysis revealed that the ten most infrequently used codons in E. tenella are UAU, UGU, GUA, CAU, AUA, CGA, UUA, CUA, CGU and AGU. Subsequent analysis of the E. tenella complete coding sequences identified 25 putative secretory and 60 putative surface proteins, all of which are now rational candidates for development as recombinant vaccines or drug targets in the effort to control avian coccidiosis.

    CONCLUSIONS: This paper describes the generation and characterisation of full-length cDNA sequences from E. tenella second generation merozoites and provides new insights into the E. tenella transcriptome. The data generated will be useful for the development and validation of diagnostic and control strategies for coccidiosis and will be of value in annotation of the E. tenella genome sequence.

  16. Wong MM, Cannon CH, Wickneswari R
    BMC Genomics, 2011;12:342.
    PMID: 21729267 DOI: 10.1186/1471-2164-12-342
    Acacia auriculiformis × Acacia mangium hybrids are commercially important trees for the timber and pulp industry in Southeast Asia. Increasing pulp yield while reducing pulping costs are major objectives of tree breeding programs. The general monolignol biosynthesis and secondary cell wall formation pathways are well-characterized but genes in these pathways are poorly characterized in Acacia hybrids. RNA-seq on short-read platforms is a rapid approach for obtaining comprehensive transcriptomic data and to discover informative sequence variants.
  17. Chin CY, Monack DM, Nathan S
    BMC Genomics, 2010;11:672.
    PMID: 21110886 DOI: 10.1186/1471-2164-11-672
    At present, very little is known about how Burkholderia pseudomallei (B. pseudomallei) interacts with its host to elicit melioidosis symptoms. We established a murine acute-phase melioidosis model and used DNA microarray technology to investigate the global host/pathogen interaction. We compared the transcriptome of infected liver and spleen with uninfected tissues over an infection period of 42 hr to identify genes whose expression is altered in response to an acute infection.
  18. Ranganathan S, Schönbach C, Nakai K, Tan TW
    BMC Genomics, 2010;11 Suppl 4:S1.
    PMID: 21143792 DOI: 10.1186/1471-2164-11-S4-S1
    The 2010 annual conference of the Asia Pacific Bioinformatics Network (APBioNet), Asia's oldest bioinformatics organisation formed in 1998, was organized as the 9th International Conference on Bioinformatics (InCoB), Sept. 26-28, 2010 in Tokyo, Japan. Initially, APBioNet created InCoB as forum to foster bioinformatics in the Asia Pacific region. Given the growing importance of interdisciplinary research, InCoB2010 included topics targeting scientists in the fields of genomic medicine, immunology and chemoinformatics, supporting translational research. Peer-reviewed manuscripts that were accepted for publication in this supplement, represent key areas of research interests that have emerged in our region. We also highlight some of the current challenges bioinformatics is facing in the Asia Pacific region and conclude our report with the announcement of APBioNet's 100 BioDatabases (BioDB100) initiative. BioDB100 will comply with the database criteria set out earlier in our proposal for Minimum Information about a Bioinformatics and Investigation (MIABi), setting the standards for biocuration and bioinformatics research, on which we will report at the next InCoB, Nov. 27 - Dec. 2, 2011 at Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
  19. Lokanathan Y, Mohd-Adnan A, Wan KL, Nathan S
    BMC Genomics, 2010;11:76.
    PMID: 20113487 DOI: 10.1186/1471-2164-11-76
    Cryptocaryon irritans is a parasitic ciliate that causes cryptocaryonosis (white spot disease) in marine fish. Diagnosis of cryptocaryonosis often depends on the appearance of white spots on the surface of the fish, which are usually visible only during later stages of the disease. Identifying suitable biomarkers of this parasite would aid the development of diagnostic tools and control strategies for C. irritans. The C. irritans genome is virtually unexplored; therefore, we generated and analyzed expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of the parasite to identify genes that encode for surface proteins, excretory/secretory proteins and repeat-containing proteins.
  20. Ranganathan S, Eisenhaber F, Tong JC, Tan TW
    BMC Genomics, 2009;10 Suppl 3:S1.
    PMID: 19958472 DOI: 10.1186/1471-2164-10-S3-S1
    The 2009 annual conference of the Asia Pacific Bioinformatics Network (APBioNet), Asia's oldest bioinformatics organisation dating back to 1998, was organized as the 8th International Conference on Bioinformatics (InCoB), Sept. 7-11, 2009 at Biopolis, Singapore. Besides bringing together scientists from the field of bioinformatics in this region, InCoB has actively engaged clinicians and researchers from the area of systems biology, to facilitate greater synergy between these two groups. InCoB2009 followed on from a series of successful annual events in Bangkok (Thailand), Penang (Malaysia), Auckland (New Zealand), Busan (South Korea), New Delhi (India), Hong Kong and Taipei (Taiwan), with InCoB2010 scheduled to be held in Tokyo, Japan, Sept. 26-28, 2010. The Workshop on Education in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (WEBCB) and symposia on Clinical Bioinformatics (CBAS), the Singapore Symposium on Computational Biology (SYMBIO) and training tutorials were scheduled prior to the scientific meeting, and provided ample opportunity for in-depth learning and special interest meetings for educators, clinicians and students. We provide a brief overview of the peer-reviewed bioinformatics manuscripts accepted for publication in this supplement, grouped into thematic areas. In order to facilitate scientific reproducibility and accountability, we have, for the first time, introduced minimum information criteria for our pubilcations, including compliance to a Minimum Information about a Bioinformatics Investigation (MIABi). As the regional research expertise in bioinformatics matures, we have delineated a minimum set of bioinformatics skills required for addressing the computational challenges of the "-omics" era.
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