Displaying publications 1 - 20 of 41 in total

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  1. Seng B, Kristanti RA, Hadibarata T, Hirayama K, Katayama-Hirayama K, Kaneko H
    Bioprocess Biosyst Eng, 2016 Jan;39(1):81-94.
    PMID: 26522660 DOI: 10.1007/s00449-015-1492-6
    Organic solid waste composting is a complex process that involves many coupled physical, chemical and biological mechanisms. To understand this complexity and to ease in planning, design and management of the composting plant, mathematical model for simulation is usually applied. The aim of this paper is to develop a mathematical model of organic substrate degradation and its performance evaluation in solid waste windrow composting system. The present model is a biomass-dependent model, considering biological growth processes under the limitation of moisture, oxygen and substrate contents, and temperature. The main output of this model is substrate content which was divided into two categories: slowly and rapidly degradable substrates. To validate the model, it was applied to a laboratory scale windrow composting of a mixture of wood chips and dog food. The wastes were filled into a cylindrical reactor of 6 cm diameter and 1 m height. The simulation program was run for 3 weeks with 1 s stepwise. The simulated results were in reasonably good agreement with the experimental results. The MC and temperature of model simulation were found to be matched with those of experiment, but limited for rapidly degradable substrates. Under anaerobic zone, the degradation of rapidly degradable substrate needs to be incorporated into the model to achieve full simulation of a long period static pile composting. This model is a useful tool to estimate the changes of substrate content during composting period, and acts as a basic model for further development of a sophisticated model.
  2. Hadibarata T, Zubir MM, Rubiyatno, Chuang TZ
    Bioprocess Biosyst Eng, 2013 Sep;36(9):1229-33.
    PMID: 23135490 DOI: 10.1007/s00449-012-0850-x
    Armillaria sp. F022, a white-rot fungus isolated from decayed wood in tropical rain forest was used to biodegrade anthracene in cultured medium. The percentage of anthracene removal by Armillaria sp. F022 reached 13 % after 7 days and at the end of the experiment, anthracene removal level was at 87 %. The anthracene removal through sorption and transformation was investigated. 69 % of eliminated anthracene was transformed by Armillaria sp. F022 to form other organic structure, while only 18 % was absorbed in the mycelia. In the kinetic experiment, anthracene dissipation will not stop even though the biomass had stopped growing. Anthracene removal by Armillaria sp. F022 was correlated with protein concentration (whole biomass) in the culture. The production of enzyme was affected by biomass production. Anthracene was transformed to two stable metabolic products. The metabolites were extracted in ethyl-acetate, isolated by column chromatography, and then identified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).
  3. Nor NM, Hadibarata T, Zubir MM, Lazim ZM, Adnan LA, Fulazzaky MA
    Bioprocess Biosyst Eng, 2015 Nov;38(11):2167-75.
    PMID: 26275435 DOI: 10.1007/s00449-015-1456-x
    Cresol Red belongs to the triphenylmethane (TPM) class of dyes which are potentially carcinogenic or mutagenic. However, very few studies on biodegradation of Cresol Red were investigated as compared to other type dyes such as azo and anthraquinone dye. The aim of this work is to evaluate triphenylmethane dye Cresol Red degradation by fungal strain isolated from the decayed wood in Johor Bahru, Malaysia. Detailed taxonomic studies identified the organisms as Trichoderma species and designated as strain Trichoderma harzianum M06. In this study, Cresol Red was decolorized up to 88% within 30 days under agitation condition by Trichoderma harzianum M06. Data analysis revealed that a pH value of 3 yielded a highest degradation rate among pH concentrations (73%), salinity concentrations of 100 g/L (73%), and a volume of 0.1 mL of Tween 80 (79%). Induction in the enzyme activities of manganese peroxidase, lignin peroxidase, laccase, 1,2- and 2,3-dioxygenase indicates their involvement in Cresol Red removal. Various analytical studies such as Thin-Layer Chromatography (TLC), UV-Vis spectrophotometer, and Gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) confirmed the biotransformation of Cresol Red by the fungus. Two metabolites were identified in the treated medium: 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (t R 7.3 min and m/z 355) and 2-hydroxybenzoic acid (t R 8.6 min and m/z 267). Based on these products, a probable pathway has been proposed for the degradation of Cresol Red by Trichoderma harzianum M06.
  4. Al-Shorgani NK, Kalil MS, Yusoff WM
    Bioprocess Biosyst Eng, 2012 Jun;35(5):817-26.
    PMID: 22147105 DOI: 10.1007/s00449-011-0664-2
    Rice bran (RB) and de-oiled rice bran (DRB) have been treated and used as the carbon source in acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) production using Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4. The results showed that pretreated DRB produced more ABE than pretreated RB. Dilute sulfuric acid was the most suitable treatment method among the various pretreatment methods that were applied. The highest ABE obtained was 12.13 g/L, including 7.72 g/L of biobutanol, from sulfuric acid. The enzymatic hydrolysate of DRB (ESADRB), when treated with XAD-4 resin, resulted in an ABE productivity and yield of 0.1 g/L h and 0.44 g/g, respectively. The results also showed that the choice of pretreatment method for RB and DRB is an important factor in butanol production.
  5. Jung YH, Kim S, Yang TH, Lee HJ, Seung D, Park YC, et al.
    Bioprocess Biosyst Eng, 2012 Nov;35(9):1497-503.
    PMID: 22644062 DOI: 10.1007/s00449-012-0739-8
    Oil palm fronds are the most abundant lignocellulosic biomass in Malaysia. In this study, fronds were tested as the potential renewable biomass for ethanol production. The soaking in aqueous ammonia pretreatment was applied, and the fermentability of pretreated fronds was evaluated using simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. The optimal pretreatment conditions were 7 % (w/w) ammonia, 80 °C, 20 h of pretreatment, and 1:12 S/L ratio, where the enzymatic digestibility was 41.4 % with cellulase of 60 FPU/g-glucan. When increasing the cellulase loading in the hydrolysis of pretreated fronds, the enzymatic digestibility increased until the enzyme loading reached 60 FPU/g-glucan. With 3 % glucan loading in the SSF of pretreated fronds, the ethanol concentration and yield based on the theoretical maximum after 12 and 48 h of the SSF were 7.5 and 9.7 g/L and 43.8 and 56.8 %, respectively. The ethanol productivities found at 12 and 24 h from pretreated fronds were 0.62 and 0.36 g/L/h, respectively.
  6. Hadibarata T, Kristanti RA
    Bioprocess Biosyst Eng, 2013 Apr;36(4):461-8.
    PMID: 22893180 DOI: 10.1007/s00449-012-0803-4
    Armillaria sp. F022 is a white-rot fungus isolated from a tropical rain forest in Indonesia that is capable of utilizing pyrene as a source of carbon and energy. Enzymes production during the degradation process by Armillaria sp. F022 was certainly related to the increase in biomass. In the first week after incubation, the growth rate rapidly increased, but enzyme production decreased. After 7 days of incubation, rapid growth was observed, whereas, the enzymes were produced only after a good amount of biomass was generated. About 63 % of pyrene underwent biodegradation when incubated with this fungus in a liquid medium on a rotary shaker (120 rpm, 25 °C) for 30 days; during this period, pyrene was transformed to five stable metabolic products. These metabolites were extracted in ethyl acetate, isolated by column chromatography, and then identified using thin layer chromatography (TLC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). 1-Hydroxypyrene was directly identified by GC-MS, while 4-phenanthroic acid, 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid, phthalic acid, and protocatechuic acid were identified to be present in their derivatized forms (methylated forms and silylated forms). Protocatechuic acid was the end product of pyrene degradation by Armillaria sp. F022. Dynamic profiles of two key enzymes, namely laccase and 1,2-dioxygenase, were revealed during the degradation process, and the results indicated the presence of a complicated mechanism in the regulation of pyrene-degrading enzymes. In conclusion, Armillaria sp. F022 is a white-rot fungus with potential for application in the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons such as pyrene in the environment.
  7. Fulazzaky MA
    Bioprocess Biosyst Eng, 2013 Jan;36(1):11-21.
    PMID: 22622964 DOI: 10.1007/s00449-012-0756-7
    Anaerobic treatment processes to remove organic matter from palm oil mill effluent (POME) have been used widely in Malaysia. Still the amounts of total organic and total mineral released from POME that may cause degradation of the receiving environment need to be verified. This paper proposes the use of the hydrodynamic equations to estimate performance of the cascaded anaerobic ponds (CAP) and to calculate amounts of total organic matter and total mineral released from POME. The CAP efficiencies to remove biochemical oxygen demands, chemical oxygen demands, total solids and volatile solids (VS) as high as 94.5, 93.6, 96.3 and 98.2 %, respectively, are estimated. The amounts of total organic matter and total mineral as high as 538 kg VS/day and 895 kg FS/day, respectively, released from POME to the receiving water are calculated. The implication of the proposed hydrodynamic equations contributes to more versatile environmental assessment techniques, sometimes replacing laboratory analysis.
  8. Darah I, Sumathi G, Jain K, Lim SH
    Bioprocess Biosyst Eng, 2011 Sep;34(7):795-801.
    PMID: 21347668 DOI: 10.1007/s00449-011-0529-8
    The ability of immobilized cell cultures of Aspergillus niger FETL FT3 to produce extracellular tannase was investigated. The production of enzyme was increased by entrapping the fungus in scouring mesh cubes compared to free cells. Using optimized parameters of six scouring mesh cubes and inoculum size of 1 × 10(6) spores/mL, the tannase production of 3.98 U/mL was obtained from the immobilized cells compared to free cells (2.81 U/mL). It was about 41.64% increment. The immobilized cultures exhibited significant tannase production stability of two repeated runs.
  9. Rahman NK, Kamaruddin AH, Uzir MH
    Bioprocess Biosyst Eng, 2011 Aug;34(6):687-99.
    PMID: 21327986 DOI: 10.1007/s00449-011-0518-y
    The influence of water activity and water content was investigated with farnesyl laurate synthesis catalyzed by Lipozyme RM IM. Lipozyme RM IM activity depended strongly on initial water activity value. The best results were achieved for a reaction medium with an initial water activity of 0.11 since it gives the best conversion value of 96.80%. The rate constants obtained in the kinetics study using Ping-Pong-Bi-Bi and Ordered-Bi-Bi mechanisms with dead-end complex inhibition of lauric acid were compared. The corresponding parameters were found to obey the Ordered-Bi-Bi mechanism with dead-end complex inhibition of lauric acid. Kinetic parameters were calculated based on this model as follows: V (max) = 5.80 mmol l(-1) min(-1) g enzyme(-1), K (m,A) = 0.70 mmol l(-1) g enzyme(-1), K (m,B) = 115.48 mmol l(-1) g enzyme(-1), K (i) = 11.25 mmol l(-1) g enzyme(-1). The optimum conditions for the esterification of farnesol with lauric acid in a continuous packed bed reactor were found as the following: 18.18 cm packed bed height and 0.9 ml/min substrate flow rate. The optimum molar conversion of lauric acid to farnesyl laurate was 98.07 ± 0.82%. The effect of mass transfer in the packed bed reactor has also been studied using two models for cases of reaction limited and mass transfer limited. A very good agreement between the mass transfer limited model and the experimental data obtained indicating that the esterification in a packed bed reactor was mass transfer limited.
  10. Ahmad Z, Don MM, Mortan SH, Noor RA
    Bioprocess Biosyst Eng, 2010 Jun;33(5):599-606.
    PMID: 19915872 DOI: 10.1007/s00449-009-0381-2
    Recently, the increased demand of fructooligosaccharides (FOS) as a functional food has alarmed researchers to screen and identify new strains capable of producing fructosyltransferase (FTase). FTase is the enzyme that converts the substrate (sucrose) to glucose and fructose. The characterization of complex sugar such as table sugar, brown sugar, molasses, etc. will be carried out and the sugar that contained the highest sucrose concentration will be selected as a substrate. Eight species of macro-fungi will be screened for its ability to produce FTase and only one strain with the highest FTase activity will be selected for further studies. In this work, neural networks (NN) have been chosen to model the process based on their excellent 'resume' in coping with nonlinear process. Bootstrap re-sampling method has been utilized in re-sampling the data in this work. This method has successfully modeled the process as shown in the results.
  11. Fazlena H, Kamaruddin AH, Zulkali MM
    Bioprocess Biosyst Eng, 2006 Mar;28(4):227-33.
    PMID: 16215728
    A lipase catalysed enantioselective hydrolysis process under in situ racemization of the remaining (R)-ibuprofen ester substrate with sodium hydroxide as the catalyst was developed for the production of S-ibuprofen from (R,S)-ibuprofen ester in isooctane. Detailed investigations on parameters study indicated that 0.5 M NaOH, addition of 20% (v/v) co-solvent (dimethyl sulphoxide), operating temperature of 45 degrees C, and 40 mmol/L substrate gave 86% conversion and 99.4% optical purity of S-ibuprofen in dynamic kinetic resolution. Meanwhile, in common enzymatic kinetic resolution process, only 42% conversion of the racemate and 93% enantiomeric excess of the product was obtained which are of lower values as compared to dynamic kinetic resolution. The S-ibuprofen produced during each process was evaluated and approximately 50% increment in concentration of S-acid product was produced when dynamic kinetic resolution was applied into the process.
  12. Serri NA, Kamaruddin AH, Long WS
    Bioprocess Biosyst Eng, 2006 Oct;29(4):253-60.
    PMID: 16868763
    Immobilized Candida rugosa lipase was used for the synthesis of citronellyl laurate from citronellol and lauric acid. Screening of different types of support (Amberlite MB-1 and Celite) for immobilization of lipase and solvent (n-hexane, n-heptane, and iso-octane) and optimization of reaction conditions, such as catalyst loading, effect of substrates molar ratio and temperature, have been studied. The maximum enzyme activity was obtained at 310 K. The immobilized C. rugosa lipase onto Amberlite MB-1 support was found to be the best support with a conversion of 89% of citronellyl laurate ester in iso-octane compared to Celite 545. Deactivation of C. rugosa lipase at 313, 318 and 323 K were observed. Ordered bi bi mechanism with dead end complex of lauric acid was found to fit the initial rate data and the kinetic parameters were obtained by non-linear regression analysis.
  13. Ganasen P, Khan MR, Kalam MA, Mahmud MS
    Bioprocess Biosyst Eng, 2014 Nov;37(11):2353-9.
    PMID: 24879090 DOI: 10.1007/s00449-014-1213-6
    This paper demonstrates Pseudomonas cepacia lipase catalyzed hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl palmitate under irradiation of light with wavelengths of 250-750 nm. The reaction follows Michaelis-Menten Kinetics and the light irradiation increases the overall rate of hydrolysis. Using Lineweaver-Burk plot K M and V max values for the reaction in presence of light are found to be 39.07 and 66.67 mM/min/g, respectively; while for the same reaction under dark condition, the values are 7.08 and 10.21 mM/min/g. The linear form of enzyme dependent rate of reaction confirms that no mass-transfer limitations are present and the reaction is a kinetically controlled enzymatic reaction.
  14. Fuzi SF, Razali F, Jahim JM, Rahman RA, Illias RM
    Bioprocess Biosyst Eng, 2014 Sep;37(9):1887-98.
    PMID: 24633311 DOI: 10.1007/s00449-014-1163-z
    A xylanase gene (xyn2) from Trichoderma reesei ATCC 58350 was previously cloned and expressed in Kluyveromyces lactis GG799. The production of the recombinant xylanase was conducted in a developed medium with an optimised batch and with fed-batches that were processed with glucose. The glucose served as a carbon source for cell growth and as an inducer for xylanase production. In a 1-L batch system, a glucose concentration of 20 g L(-1) and 80 % dissolved oxygen were found to provide the best conditions for the tested ranges. A xylanase activity of 75.53 U mL(-1) was obtained. However, in the batch mode, glucose depletions reduced the synthesis of recombinant xylanase by K. lactis GG799. To maximise the production of xylanase, further optimisation was performed using exponential feeding. We investigated the effects of various nitrogen sources combined with the carbon to nitrogen (C/N) molar ratio on the production of xylanase. Of the various nitrogen sources, yeast extract was found to be the most useful for recombinant xylanase production. The highest xylanase production (110.13 U mL(-1)) was measured at a C/N ratio of 50.08. These conditions led to a 45.8 % increase in xylanase activity compared with the batch cultures. Interestingly, the further addition of 500 g L(-1) glucose led to a 6.2-fold increase (465.07 U mL(-1)) in recombinant xylanase activity. These findings, together with those of the exponential feeding strategy, indicate that the composition of the C/N molar ratio has a substantial impact on recombinant protein production in K. lactis.
  15. Hadibarata T, Nor NM
    Bioprocess Biosyst Eng, 2014 Sep;37(9):1879-85.
    PMID: 24623464 DOI: 10.1007/s00449-014-1162-0
    Polyporus sp. S133 decolorized the Amaranth in 72 h (30 mg L(-1)) under static and shaking conditions. Liquid medium containing glucose has shown the highest decolorization of Amaranth by Polyporus sp. S133. When the effect of increasing inoculum concentration on decolorization of Amaranth was studied, maximum decolorization was observed with 15 % inoculum concentration. Significant increase in the enzyme production of laccase (102.2 U L(-1)) was observed over the period of Amaranth decolorization compared to lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase. Germination rate of Sorghum vulgare and Triticum aestivum was less with Amaranth treatment as compared to metabolites obtained after its decolorization. Based on the metabolites detected by GC-MS, it was proposed that Amaranth was bio-transformed into two intermediates, 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid and 1,4-naphthaquinone. Overall findings suggested the ability of Polyporus sp. S133 for the decolorization of azo dye and ensured the ecofriendly degradation of Amaranth.
  16. Misson M, Jin B, Chen B, Zhang H
    Bioprocess Biosyst Eng, 2015 Oct;38(10):1915-23.
    PMID: 26104537 DOI: 10.1007/s00449-015-1432-5
    A functionalized polystyrene nanofiber (PSNF) immobilized β-galactosidase assembly (PSNF-Gal) was synthesized as a nanobiocatalyst aiming to enhance the biocatalyst stability and functional ability. The PSNF fabricated by electrospinning was functionalized through a chemical oxidation method for enzyme binding. The bioengineering performance of the enzyme carriers was further evaluated for bioconversion of lactose to galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS). The modified PSNF-Gal demonstrated distinguished performances to preserve the same activity as the free β-galactosidase at the optimum pH of 7.0, and to enhance the enzyme stability of PSNF-Gal in an alkaline condition up to pH 10. The PSNF assembly demonstrated improved thermal stability from 37 to 60 °C. The nanobiocatalyst was able to retain 30 % of its initial activity after ninth operation cycles comparing to four cycles with the unmodified counterpart. In contrast with free β-galactosidase, the modified PSNF-Gal enhanced the GOS yield from 14 to 28 %. These findings show the chemically modified PSNF-based nanobiocatalyst may be pertinent for various enzyme-catalysed bioprocessing applications.
  17. Liau KF, Shoji T, Ong YH, Chua AS, Yeoh HK, Ho PY
    Bioprocess Biosyst Eng, 2015 Apr;38(4):729-37.
    PMID: 25381606 DOI: 10.1007/s00449-014-1313-3
    A recently reported stable and efficient EBPR system at high temperatures around 30 °C has led to characterization of kinetic and stoichiometric parameters of the Activated Sludge Model no. 2d (ASM2d). Firstly, suitable model parameters were selected by identifiability analysis. Next, the model was calibrated and validated. ASM2d was found to represent the processes well at 28 and 32 °C except in polyhyroxyalkanoate (PHA) accumulation of the latter. The values of the kinetic parameters for PHA storage (q PHA), polyphosphate storage (q PP) and growth (μ PAO) of polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAOs) at 28 and 32 °C were found to be much higher than those reported by previous studies. Besides, the value of the stoichiometric parameter for the requirement of polyphosphate for PHA storage (Y PO4) was found to decrease as temperature rose from 28 to 32 °C. Values of two other stoichiometric parameters, i.e. the growth yield of heterotrophic organisms (Y H) and PAOs (Y PAO), were high at both temperatures. These calibrated parameters imply that the extremely active PAOs of the study were able to store PHA, store polyphosphate and even utilize PHA for cell growth. Besides, the parameters do not follow the Arrhenius correlation due to the previously reported unique microbial clade at 28 and 32 °C, which actively performs EBPR at high temperatures.
  18. Hadibarata T, Teh ZC
    Bioprocess Biosyst Eng, 2014 Aug;37(8):1679-84.
    PMID: 24554082 DOI: 10.1007/s00449-014-1140-6
    Pleurotus pulmonarius F043, a fungus collected from tropical rain forest, was used to degrade pyrene, a four-rings polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), in a mineral medium broth. A maximum degradation rate of pyrene (90 %) was occurred at pH 3 and the lowest degradation rate was found in the culture at pH 10 (2 %). More than 90 % pyrene degradation was achieved at pH ranged from 3 to 5, whereas the degradation rate significantly declined when the pH was >5. The degradation of pyrene increased from 2 to 96 % when the temperature rose from 4 to 25 °C. When the temperature was increased to 60 °C resulting the lowest degradation rate into 7 %. Among the agitation rates tested, 120 rpm was the best with 95 % degradation, followed by 100 rpm (90 %). The optimum agitation range for pyrene degradation by P. pulmonarius F043 was 100-120 rpm. Among all the concentrations tested, 0.5 % Tween 80 was the best with 98 % degradation, followed by 1 % Tween 80 (90 %). The optimum concentration of Tween 80 for pyrene degradation by P. pulmonarius F043 was 0.5-1 %. The degradation rate decreased, while the concentration of Tween 80 was increased. The metabolic product was found during degradation process through the identification of gentisic acid by TLC, UV-Spectrophotometer, and GC-MS.
  19. Baranitharan E, Khan MR, Prasad DM, Teo WF, Tan GY, Jose R
    Bioprocess Biosyst Eng, 2015 Jan;38(1):15-24.
    PMID: 24981021 DOI: 10.1007/s00449-014-1239-9
    Anode biofilm is a crucial component in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) for electrogenesis. Better knowledge about the biofilm development process on electrode surface is believed to improve MFC performance. In this study, double-chamber microbial fuel cell was operated with diluted POME (initial COD = 1,000 mg L(-1)) and polyacrylonitrile carbon felt was used as electrode. The maximum power density, COD removal efficiency and Coulombic efficiency were found as 22 mW m(-2), 70 and 24 %, respectively. FTIR and TGA analysis confirmed the formation of biofilm on the electrode surface during MFC operation. The impact of anode biofilm on anodic polarization resistance was investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and microbial community changes during MFC operation using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The EIS-simulated results showed the reduction of charge transfer resistance (R ct) by 16.9 % after 14 days of operation of the cell, which confirms that the development of the microbial biofilm on the anode decreases the R ct and therefore improves power generation. DGGE analysis showed the variation in the biofilm composition during the biofilm growth until it forms an initial stable microbial community, thereafter the change in the diversity would be less. The power density showed was directly dependent on the biofilm development and increased significantly during the initial biofilm development period. Furthermore, DGGE patterns obtained from 7th and 14th day suggest the presence of less diversity and probable functional redundancy within the anodic communities possibly responsible for the stable MFC performance in changing environmental conditions.
  20. Oon YS, Ong SA, Ho LN, Wong YS, Oon YL, Lehl HK, et al.
    Bioprocess Biosyst Eng, 2016 Jun;39(6):893-900.
    PMID: 26894384 DOI: 10.1007/s00449-016-1568-y
    The main aim of this study is to investigate the performance of organic oxidation and denitrification of the system under long-term operation. The MFC reactor was operated in continuous mode for 180 days. Nitrate was successfully demonstrated as terminal electron acceptor, where nitrate was reduced at the cathode using electron provided by acetate oxidation at the anode. The removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and nitrate were higher in the closed circuit system than in open circuit system. Both COD and nitrate reduction improved with the increase of organic loading and subsequently contributed to higher power output. The maximum nitrate removal efficiency was 88 ± 4 % (influent of 141 ± 14 mg/L). The internal resistant was 50 Ω, which was found to be low for a double chambered MFC. The maximum power density was 669 mW/m(3) with current density of 3487 mA/m(3).
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