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  1. Kariminia A, Durier N, Jourdain G, Saghayam S, Do CV, Nguyen LV, et al.
    J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr., 2014 Sep 01;67(1):71-6.
    PMID: 24872132 DOI: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000000227
    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the value of time-updated weight and height in predicting clinical progression, and immunological and virological failure in children receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART).

    METHODS: We used Cox regression to analyze data of a cohort of Asian children.

    RESULTS: A total of 2608 children were included; median age at cART was 5.7 years. Time-updated weight for age z score < -3 was associated with mortality (P < 0.001) independent of CD4% and < -2 was associated with immunological failure (P ≤ 0.03) independent of age at cART.

    CONCLUSIONS: Weight monitoring provides useful data to inform clinical management of children on cART in resource-limited settings.

  2. Phanuphak P, Sirivichayakul S, Jiamsakul A, Sungkanuparph S, Kumarasamy N, Lee MP, et al.
    J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr., 2014 May 01;66(1):74-9.
    PMID: 24413039 DOI: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000000108
    BACKGROUND: We compared treatment outcomes of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) in patients on fully or partially sensitive drug regimens.

    METHODS: Factors associated with survival and failure were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards and discrete time conditional logistic models.

    RESULTS: TDR, found in 60 (4.1%) of 1471 Asian treatment-naive patients, was one of the significant predictors of failure. Patients with TDR to >1 drug in their regimen were >3 times as likely to fail compared to no TDR.

    CONCLUSIONS: TDR was associated with failure in the context of non-fully sensitive regimens. Efforts are needed to incorporate resistance testing into national treatment programs.

  3. Oyomopito RA, Li PC, Sungkanuparph S, Phanuphak P, Tee KK, Sirisanthana T, et al.
    J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr., 2013 Mar 01;62(3):293-300.
    PMID: 23138836 DOI: 10.1097/QAI.0b013e31827a2e8f
    BACKGROUND: HIV-1 group M viruses diverge 25%-35% in envelope, important for viral attachment during infection, and 10%-15% in the pol region, under selection pressure from common antiretrovirals. In Asia, subtypes B and CRF01_AE are common genotypes. Our objectives were to determine whether clinical, immunological, or virological treatment responses differed by genotype in treatment-naive patients initiating first-line therapy.

    METHODS: Prospectively collected longitudinal data from patients in Thailand, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Japan, Taiwan, and South Korea were provided for analysis. Covariates included demographics, hepatitis B and C coinfections, baseline CD4 T lymphocyte count, and plasma HIV-1 RNA levels. Clinical deterioration (a new diagnosis of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention category B/AIDS-defining illness or death) was assessed by proportional hazards models. Surrogate endpoints were 12-month change in CD4 cell count and virologic suppression post therapy, evaluated by linear and logistic regression, respectively.

    RESULTS: Of 1105 patients, 1036 (93.8%) infected with CRF01_AE or subtype B were eligible for inclusion in clinical deterioration analyses and contributed 1546.7 person-years of follow-up (median: 413 days, interquartile range: 169-672 days). Patients >40 years demonstrated smaller immunological increases (P = 0.002) and higher risk of clinical deterioration (hazard ratio = 2.17; P = 0.008). Patients with baseline CD4 cell counts >200 cells per microliter had lower risk of clinical deterioration (hazard ratio = 0.373; P = 0.003). A total of 532 patients (48.1% of eligible) had CD4 counts available at baseline and 12 months post therapy for inclusion in immunolgic analyses. Patients infected with subtype B had larger increases in CD4 counts at 12 months (P = 0.024). A total of 530 patients (48.0% of eligible) were included in virological analyses with no differences in response found between genotypes.

    CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that patients infected with CRF01_AE have reduced immunologic response to therapy at 12 months, compared with subtype B-infected counterparts. Clinical deterioration was associated with low baseline CD4 counts and older age. The lack of differences in virologic outcomes suggests that all patients have opportunities for virological suppression.

  4. Li Y, Tee KK, Liao H, Hase S, Uenishi R, Li XJ, et al.
    J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr., 2010 Jun;54(2):129-36.
    PMID: 20386110 DOI: 10.1097/QAI.0b013e3181d82ce5
    A molecular epidemiological investigation conducted among injecting drug users in eastern Peninsular Malaysia in 2007 identified a cluster of sequences (n = 3) located outside any known HIV-1 genotype. Analyses of near full-length nucleotide sequences of these strains from individuals with no recognizable linkage revealed that they have an identical subtype structure comprised of CRF01_AE and subtype B', distinct from any known circulating recombinant forms (CRFs). This novel CRF, designated CRF48_01B, is closely related to CRF33_01B, previously identified in Kuala Lumpur. Phylogenetic analysis of multiple CRF48_01B genome regions showed that CRF48_01B forms a monophyletic cluster within CRF33_01B, suggesting that this new recombinant is very likely a descendant of CRF33_01B. CRF48_01B thus represents one of the first examples of a "second-generation" CRF, generated by additional crossover with pre-existing CRFs. Corroborating these results, Bayesian molecular clock analyses indicated that CRF48_01B emerged in approximately 2001, approximately approximately 8 years after the emergence of CRF33_01B.
  5. Larney S, Mathers BM, Poteat T, Kamarulzaman A, Degenhardt L
    J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr., 2015 Jun 01;69 Suppl 2:S100-9.
    PMID: 25978476 DOI: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000000623
    BACKGROUND: Women and girls who use and inject drugs are a critical population at risk of HIV. In this article, we review data on the epidemiology of drug use and injection among women globally and HIV prevalence among women and girls who use and inject drugs.

    RESULTS: Women and girls comprise one-third of people who use and inject drugs globally. There is substantial variation in HIV prevalence in this population, between and within countries. There is a pronounced lack of data examining HIV risk among particularly vulnerable subpopulations of women who use and inject drugs, including women who have sex with women, transgender women, racial and ethnic minority women, and young women. Women who use and inject drugs experience stigma and discrimination that affect access to services, and high levels of sexual risk exposures.

    CONCLUSIONS: There are significant gaps in our understanding of the epidemiology of drug use and injecting among women and girls and HIV risk and prevalence in this population. Women are frequently underrepresented in studies of drug use and HIV risk and prevalence among people who inject drugs, limiting our understanding of possible sex differences in this population. Most research originates from developed countries and may not be generalizable to other settings. A great deal of work is needed to improve understanding of HIV among particularly vulnerable subpopulations, such as transgender women who use drugs. Better data are critical to efforts to advocate for the needs of women and girls who use and inject drugs.

  6. Ahn JY, Boettiger D, Law M, Kumarasamy N, Yunihastuti E, Chaiwarith R, et al.
    J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr., 2015 Jul 01;69(3):e85-92.
    PMID: 25850606 DOI: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000000634
    BACKGROUND: Current treatment guidelines for HIV infection recommend routine CD4 lymphocyte (CD4) count monitoring in patients with viral suppression. This may have a limited impact on influencing care as clinically meaningful CD4 decline rarely occurs during viral suppression.

    METHODS: In a regional HIV observational cohort in the Asia-Pacific region, patients with viral suppression (2 consecutive viral loads <400 copies/mL) and a CD4 count ≥200 cells per microliter who had CD4 testing 6 monthly were analyzed. Main study end points were occurrence of 1 CD4 count <200 cells per microliter (single CD4 <200) and 2 CD4 counts <200 cells per microliter within a 6-month period (confirmed CD4 <200). A comparison of time with single and confirmed CD4 <200 with biannual or annual CD4 assessment was performed by generating a hypothetical group comprising the same patients with annual CD4 testing by removing every second CD4 count.

    RESULTS: Among 1538 patients, the rate of single CD4 <200 was 3.45/100 patient-years and of confirmed CD4 <200 was 0.77/100 patient-years. During 5 years of viral suppression, patients with baseline CD4 200-249 cells per microliter were significantly more likely to experience confirmed CD4 <200 compared with patients with higher baseline CD4 [hazard ratio, 55.47 (95% confidence interval: 7.36 to 418.20), P < 0.001 versus baseline CD4 ≥500 cells/μL]. Cumulative probabilities of confirmed CD4 <200 was also higher in patients with baseline CD4 200-249 cells per microliter compared with patients with higher baseline CD4. There was no significant difference in time to confirmed CD4 <200 between biannual and annual CD4 measurement (P = 0.336).

    CONCLUSIONS: Annual CD4 monitoring in virally suppressed HIV patients with a baseline CD4 ≥250 cells per microliter may be sufficient for clinical management.

  7. Boettiger DC, Nguyen VK, Durier N, Bui HV, Heng Sim BL, Azwa I, et al.
    J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr., 2015 Feb 01;68(2):186-95.
    PMID: 25590271 DOI: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000000411
    BACKGROUND: Roughly 4% of the 1.25 million patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Asia are using second-line therapy. To maximize patient benefit and regional resources, it is important to optimize the timing of second-line ART initiation and use the most effective compounds available.

    METHODS: HIV-positive patients enrolled in the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database who had used second-line ART for ≥6 months were included. ART use and rates and predictors of second-line treatment failure were evaluated.

    RESULTS: There were 302 eligible patients. Most were male (76.5%) and exposed to HIV via heterosexual contact (71.5%). Median age at second-line initiation was 39.2 years, median CD4 cell count was 146 cells per cubic millimeter, and median HIV viral load was 16,224 copies per milliliter. Patients started second-line ART before 2007 (n = 105), 2007-2010 (n = 147) and after 2010 (n = 50). Ritonavir-boosted lopinavir and atazanavir accounted for the majority of protease inhibitor use after 2006. Median follow-up time on second-line therapy was 2.3 years. The rates of treatment failure and mortality per 100 patient/years were 8.8 (95% confidence interval: 7.1 to 10.9) and 1.1 (95% confidence interval: 0.6 to 1.9), respectively. Older age, high baseline viral load, and use of a protease inhibitor other than lopinavir or atazanavir were associated with a significantly shorter time to second-line failure.

    CONCLUSIONS: Increased access to viral load monitoring to facilitate early detection of first-line ART failure and subsequent treatment switch is important for maximizing the durability of second-line therapy in Asia. Although second-line ART is highly effective in the region, the reported rate of failure emphasizes the need for third-line ART in a small portion of patients.

  8. Tee KK, Li XJ, Nohtomi K, Ng KP, Kamarulzaman A, Takebe Y
    J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr., 2006 Dec 15;43(5):523-9.
    PMID: 17031320
    A molecular epidemiological investigation was conducted among various risk populations (n = 184) in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, in 2003 to 2005, on the basis of nucleotide sequences of protease and reverse transcriptase regions. In addition to circulating HIV-1 strains, including CRF01_AE (57.1%), subtype B (20.1%), and subtype C (0.5%), we detected a candidate with a new circulating recombinant form (CRF). We determined four near-full-length nucleotide sequences with identical subtype structure from epidemiologically unlinked individuals of different risk and ethnic groups. In this chimera, two short subtype B segments were inserted into the gag-RT region in a backbone of CRF01_AE. The recombinant structure was distinct from previously identified CRF15_01B in Thailand. In agreement with the current HIV nomenclature system, this constitutes a novel CRF (CRF33_01B). The overall prevalence of CRF33_01B is 19.0% (35/184). Although the prevalence of CRF33_01B is particularly high among injecting drug users (42.0%, 21/50), it is also detected in a substantial proportion of homo-/bisexual males (18.8%, 3/16) and heterosexuals (9.8%, 9/92). Moreover, unique recombinant forms composed of CRF01_AE and subtype B that have a significant structural relationship with CRF33_01B were detected in 1.6% (3/184) of study subjects, suggesting an ongoing recombination process in Malaysia. This new CRF seems to be bridging viral transmission between different risk populations in this country.
  9. Kamarulzaman A
    J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr., 2009 Nov;52 Suppl 1:S17-9.
    PMID: 19858930 DOI: 10.1097/QAI.0b013e3181bbc9af
    Faced with a rising HIV epidemic among injecting drug users, harm reduction policies and programs were introduced in Malaysia in 2005. The positive impact seen since the introduction of these programs comprise the inclusion of the health aspects of illicit drug use in the country's drug policies; better access to antiretroviral therapy for injecting drug users who are HIV infected; reduction in HIV-risk behavior; and greater social benefits, including increased employment. Despite these achievements, tension between law enforcement and public health persists, as harm reduction exists alongside an overall drug policy that is based on abstinence and zero tolerance. Unless there is harmonization of this policy, sustainability and scale-up of harm reduction programs will remain a challenge.
  10. Springer SA, Di Paola A, Azar MM, Barbour R, Biondi BE, Desabrais M, et al.
    J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr., 2018 05 01;78(1):43-53.
    PMID: 29373393 DOI: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000001634
    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX) would improve or maintain viral suppression (VS) among prisoners or jail detainees with HIV and opioid use disorder (OUD) transitioning to the community.

    DESIGN: A 4-site, prospective randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted among prison and jail inmates with HIV and OUD transitioning to the community from September 2010 through March 2016.

    METHODS: Eligible participants (N = 93) were randomized 2:1 to receive 6 monthly injections of XR-NTX (n = 66) or placebo (n = 27) starting at release and observed for 6 months. The primary outcome was the proportion that maintained or improved VS (<50 copies/mL) from baseline to 6 months.

    RESULTS: Participants allocated to XR-NTX significantly improved to VS (<50 copies/mL) from baseline (37.9%) to 6 months (60.6%) (P = 0.002), whereas the placebo group did not (55.6% at baseline to 40.7% at 6 months P = 0.294). There was, however, no statistical significant difference in VS levels at 6 months between XR-NTX (60.6%) vs. placebo (40.7%) (P = 0.087). After controlling for other factors, only allocation to XR-NTX (adjusted odds ratio = 2.90; 95% confidence interval = 1.04 to 8.14, P = 0.043) was associated with the primary outcome. Trajectories in VS from baseline to 6 months differed significantly (P = 0.017) between treatment groups, and the differences in the discordant values were significantly different as well (P = 0.041): the XR-NTX group was more likely than the placebo group to improve VS (30.3% vs. 18.5%), maintain VS (30.3% vs. 27.3), and less likely to lose VS (7.6% vs. 33.3%) by 6 months.

    CONCLUSIONS: XR-NTX improves or maintains VS after release to the community for incarcerated people living with HIV with OUD.

  11. Pasayan MKU, S Mationg ML, Boettiger D, Lam W, Zhang F, Ku SW, et al.
    J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr., 2019 04 01;80(4):436-443.
    PMID: 30550488 DOI: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000001933
    BACKGROUND: Mycobacterium avium complex prophylaxis is recommended for patients with advanced HIV infection. With the decrease in incidence of disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex infection and the availability of antiretroviral therapy (ART), the benefits of macrolide prophylaxis were investigated. This study examined the impact of macrolide prophylaxis on AIDS-defining conditions and HIV-associated mortality in a cohort of HIV-infected patients on ART.

    METHODS: Patients from TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database (September 2015 data transfer) aged 18 years and older with a CD4 count <50 cells/mm at ART initiation were included. The effect of macrolide prophylaxis on HIV-associated mortality or AIDS-defining conditions (as a combined outcome) and HIV-associated mortality alone were evaluated using competing risk regression. Sensitivity analysis was conducted in patients with a CD4 <100 cells/mm at ART initiation.

    RESULTS: Of 1345 eligible patients, 10.6% received macrolide prophylaxis. The rate of the combined outcome was 7.35 [95% confidence interval (CI): 6.04 to 8.95] per 100 patient-years, whereas the rate of HIV-associated mortality was 3.14 (95% CI: 2.35 to 4.19) per 100 patient-years. Macrolide use was associated with a significantly decreased risk of HIV-associated mortality (hazard ratio 0.10, 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.80, P = 0.031) but not with the combined outcome (hazard ratio 0.86, 95% CI: 0.32 to 2.229, P = 0.764). Sensitivity analyses showed consistent results among patients with a CD4 <100 cells/mm at ART initiation.

    CONCLUSIONS: Macrolide prophylaxis is associated with improved survival among Asian HIV-infected patients with low CD4 cell counts and on ART. This study suggests the increased usage and coverage of macrolide prophylaxis among people living with HIV in Asia.

  12. Mu W, Bartlett AW, Bunupuradah T, Chokephaibulkit K, Kumarasamy N, Ly PS, et al.
    J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr., 2019 03 01;80(3):308-315.
    PMID: 30531299 DOI: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000001921
    BACKGROUND: Virologic failure is a major threat to maintaining effective combination antiretroviral therapy, especially for children in need of lifelong treatment. With efforts to expand access to HIV viral load testing, our understanding of pediatric virologic failure is evolving.

    SETTING: An Asian cohort in 16 pediatric HIV services across 6 countries.

    METHODS: From 2005 to 2014, patients younger than 20 years who achieved virologic suppression and had subsequent viral load testing were included. Early virologic failure was defined as a HIV RNA ≥1000 copies per milliliter within 12 months of virologic suppression, and late virologic as a HIV RNA ≥1000 copies per milliliter after 12 months following virologic suppression. Characteristics at combination antiretroviral therapy initiation and virologic suppression were described, and a competing risk time-to-event analysis was used to determine cumulative incidence of virologic failure and factors at virologic suppression associated with early and late virologic failure.

    RESULTS: Of 1105 included in the analysis, 182 (17.9%) experienced virologic failure. The median age at virologic suppression was 6.9 years, and the median time to virologic failure was 24.6 months after virologic suppression. The incidence rate for a first virologic failure event was 3.3 per 100 person-years. Factors at virologic suppression associated with late virologic failure included older age, mostly rural clinic setting, tuberculosis, protease inhibitor-based regimens, and early virologic failure. No risk factors were identified for early virologic failure.

    CONCLUSIONS: Around 1 in 5 experienced virologic failure in our cohort after achieving virologic suppression. Targeted interventions to manage complex treatment scenarios, including adolescents, tuberculosis coinfection, and those with poor virologic control are required.

  13. Jiamsakul A, Polizzotto M, Wen-Wei Ku S, Tanuma J, Hui E, Chaiwarith R, et al.
    J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr., 2019 03 01;80(3):301-307.
    PMID: 30531303 DOI: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000001918
    BACKGROUND: Hematological malignancies have continued to be highly prevalent among people living with HIV (PLHIV). This study assessed the occurrence of, risk factors for, and outcomes of hematological and nonhematological malignancies in PLHIV in Asia.

    METHODS: Incidence of malignancy after cohort enrollment was evaluated. Factors associated with development of hematological and nonhematological malignancy were analyzed using competing risk regression and survival time using Kaplan-Meier.

    RESULTS: Of 7455 patients, 107 patients (1%) developed a malignancy: 34 (0.5%) hematological [0.08 per 100 person-years (/100PY)] and 73 (1%) nonhematological (0.17/100PY). Of the hematological malignancies, non-Hodgkin lymphoma was predominant (n = 26, 76%): immunoblastic (n = 6, 18%), Burkitt (n = 5, 15%), diffuse large B-cell (n = 5, 15%), and unspecified (n = 10, 30%). Others include central nervous system lymphoma (n = 7, 21%) and myelodysplastic syndrome (n = 1, 3%). Nonhematological malignancies were mostly Kaposi sarcoma (n = 12, 16%) and cervical cancer (n = 10, 14%). Risk factors for hematological malignancy included age >50 vs. ≤30 years [subhazard ratio (SHR) = 6.48, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.79 to 23.43] and being from a high-income vs. a lower-middle-income country (SHR = 3.97, 95% CI: 1.45 to 10.84). Risk was reduced with CD4 351-500 cells/µL (SHR = 0.20, 95% CI: 0.05 to 0.74) and CD4 >500 cells/µL (SHR = 0.14, 95% CI: 0.04 to 0.78), compared to CD4 ≤200 cells/µL. Similar risk factors were seen for nonhematological malignancy, with prior AIDS diagnosis showing a weak association. Patients diagnosed with a hematological malignancy had shorter survival time compared to patients diagnosed with a nonhematological malignancy.

    CONCLUSIONS: Nonhematological malignancies were common but non-Hodgkin lymphoma was more predominant in our cohort. PLHIV from high-income countries were more likely to be diagnosed, indicating a potential underdiagnosis of cancer in low-income settings.

  14. Bartlett AW, Lumbiganon P, Jamal Mohamed TA, Lapphra K, Muktiarti D, Du QT, et al.
    J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr., 2019 12 15;82(5):431-438.
    PMID: 31714422 DOI: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000002184
    BACKGROUND: Perinatally HIV-infected adolescents (PHIVA) are an expanding population vulnerable to loss to follow-up (LTFU). Understanding the epidemiology and factors for LTFU is complicated by varying LTFU definitions.

    SETTING: Asian regional cohort incorporating 16 pediatric HIV services across 6 countries.

    METHODS: Data from PHIVA (aged 10-19 years) who received combination antiretroviral therapy 2007-2016 were used to analyze LTFU through (1) an International epidemiology Databases to Evaluate AIDS (IeDEA) method that determined LTFU as >90 days late for an estimated next scheduled appointment without returning to care and (2) the absence of patient-level data for >365 days before the last data transfer from clinic sites. Descriptive analyses and competing-risk survival and regression analyses were used to evaluate LTFU epidemiology and associated factors when analyzed using each method.

    RESULTS: Of 3509 included PHIVA, 275 (7.8%) met IeDEA and 149 (4.3%) met 365-day absence LTFU criteria. Cumulative incidence of LTFU was 19.9% and 11.8% using IeDEA and 365-day absence criteria, respectively. Risk factors for LTFU across both criteria included the following: age at combination antiretroviral therapy initiation <5 years compared with age ≥5 years, rural clinic settings compared with urban clinic settings, and high viral loads compared with undetectable viral loads. Age 10-14 years compared with age 15-19 years was another risk factor identified using 365-day absence criteria but not IeDEA LTFU criteria.

    CONCLUSIONS: Between 12% and 20% of PHIVA were determined LTFU with treatment fatigue and rural treatment settings consistent risk factors. Better tracking of adolescents is required to provide a definitive understanding of LTFU and optimize evidence-based models of care.

  15. Ross JL, Teeraananchai S, Lumbiganon P, Hansudewechakul R, Chokephaibulkit K, Khanh TH, et al.
    J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr., 2019 06 01;81(2):e28-e38.
    PMID: 30865173 DOI: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000002008
    BACKGROUND: Adolescents living with HIV (ALHIV) have poorer adherence and clinical outcomes than adults. We conducted a study to assess behavioral risks and antiretroviral therapy outcomes among ALHIV in Asia.

    METHODS: A prospective cohort study among ALHIV and matched HIV-uninfected controls aged 12-18 years was conducted at 9 sites in Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam from July 2013 to March 2017. Participants completed an audio computer-assisted self-interview at weeks 0, 48, 96, and 144. Virologic failure (VF) was defined as ≥1 viral load (VL) measurement >1000 copies/mL. Generalized estimating equations were used to identify predictors for VF.

    RESULTS: Of 250 ALHIV and 59 HIV-uninfected controls, 58% were Thai and 51% females. The median age was 14 years at enrollment; 93% of ALHIV were perinatally infected. At week 144, 66% of ALHIV were orphans vs. 28% of controls (P < 0.01); similar proportions of ALHIV and controls drank alcohol (58% vs. 65%), used inhalants (1% vs. 2%), had been sexually active (31% vs. 21%), and consistently used condoms (42% vs. 44%). Of the 73% of ALHIV with week 144 VL testing, median log VL was 1.60 (interquartile range 1.30-1.70) and 19% had VF. Over 70% of ALHIV had not disclosed their HIV status. Self-reported adherence ≥95% was 60% at week 144. Smoking cigarettes, >1 sexual partner, and living with nonparent relatives, a partner or alone, were associated with VF at any time.

    CONCLUSIONS: The subset of ALHIV with poorer adherence and VF require comprehensive interventions that address sexual risk, substance use, and HIV-status disclosure.

  16. Springer SA, Di Paola A, Barbour R, Azar MM, Altice FL
    J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr., 2018 09 01;79(1):92-100.
    PMID: 29781884 DOI: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000001759
    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX) would improve or maintain viral suppression (VS) among incarcerated individuals with HIV and alcohol use disorders (AUDs) transitioning to the community.

    DESIGN: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted among incarcerated individuals with HIV and AUDs transitioning to the community from 2010 through 2016.

    METHODS: Eligible participants (N = 100) were randomized 2:1 to receive 6 monthly injections of XR-NTX (n = 67) or placebo (n = 33) starting at release and continued for 6 months. The primary and secondary outcomes were the proportion that maintained or improved VS at <200 and <50 copies per milliliter from baseline to 6 months, respectively, using an intention-to-treat analysis.

    RESULTS: Participants allocated to XR-NTX improved VS from baseline to 6 months for <200 copies per milliliter (48.0%-64.2%, P = 0.024) and for <50 copies per milliliter (31.0%-56.7%, P = 0.001), whereas the placebo group did not (<200 copies/mL: 64%-42.4%, P = 0.070; <50 copies/mL: 42.0%-30.3%, P = 0.292). XR-NTX participants were more likely to achieve VS than the placebo group at 6 months (<200 copies/mL: 64.2% vs. 42.4%; P = 0.041; <50 copies/mL: 56.7% vs. 30.3%; P = 0.015). XR-NTX independently predicted VS [<200 copies/mL: adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 2.68, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.01 to 7.09, P = 0.047; <50 copies/mL: aOR = 4.54; 95% CI = 1.43 to 14.43, P = 0.009] as did receipt of ≥3 injections (<200 copies/mL: aOR = 3.26; 95% CI = 1.26 to 8.47, P = 0.010; <50 copies/mL: aOR = 6.34; 95% CI = 2.08 to 19.29, P = 0.001). Reductions in alcohol consumption (aOR = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.03 to 1.98, P = 0.033) and white race (aOR = 5.37, 95% CI = 1.08 to 27.72, P = 0.040) also predicted VS at <50 copies per milliliter.

    CONCLUSIONS: XR-NTX improves or maintains VS after release to the community for incarcerated people living with HIV and AUDs.

  17. Ansari AW, Ahmad F, Shankar EM, Kong YY, Tan HY, Jacobs R, et al.
    PMID: 32398557 DOI: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000002399
    BACKGROUND: We have previously shown an association of elevated co-inhibitory molecule 2B4 expression with iNKT cells alterations in HIV disease. Herein we show a comparative analysis of 2B4 expression on iNKT cells of HIV long-term non-progressors (LTNPs) and progressors.

    METHODS: Anti-retroviral therapy (ART) naïve HIV-seropositive individuals (progressors, n=16) and long-term non-progressors (LTNPs, n=10) were recruited for this study. We employed multi-color flow cytometry on frozen peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to determine iNKT subset frequencies, the levels of co-inhibitory 2B4 expression, and intracellular IFN-γ production. CD1d tetramer was used to characterize iNKT cells.

    RESULTS: We report significantly lower level of 2B4 expression on bulk LTNPs iNKT cells as well as on their CD4 subsets compared to HIV progressors. Furthermore, the iNKT cells from LTNPs produced higher amount of IFN-γ than HIV progressors as detected by intracellular cytokine staining. Interestingly, the frequency of 2B4iNKT cells of progressors but not LTNPs significantly correlates with CD4 T cell count, HIV viral load and IFNγ production by iNKT cells.

    CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that in addition to suppressed HIV replication, diminished 2B4 expression and associated co-inhibitory signaling, and substantial production of IFN-γ could contribute to preserved iNKT cell phenotype in LTNPs.

  18. Han WM, Bijker R, Chandrasekaran E, Pujari S, Ng OT, Ly PS, et al.
    PMID: 32740369 DOI: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000002464
    BACKGROUND: We validated the Data collection on Adverse events of anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D) full- and short-risk score models for CKD in the Asian HIV cohorts.

    SETTINGS: A validation study among people living with HIV(PLHIV) aged ≥18 years among the cohorts in the Asia-Pacific region.

    METHODS: PLHIV with baseline eGFR>60 mL/min/1.73m were included for validation of the D:A:D CKD full version and the short version without cardiovascular risk factors. Those with <3 eGFR measurements from baseline or previous exposure to potentially nephrotoxic antiretrovirals were excluded. Kaplan-Meier methods were used to estimate the probability of CKD development. Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristics (AUROC) was also used to validate the risk score.

    RESULTS: We included 5,701 participants in full model(median 8.1 [IQR 4.8-10.9] years follow-up) and 9,791 in short model validation(median 4.9 [IQR 2.5-7.3] years follow-up). The crude incidence rate of CKD was 8.1 (95%CI 7.3-8.9) per 1,000 person-years(PYS) in the full model cohort and 10.5 (95%CI 9.6-11.4) per 1,000 PYS in the short model cohort. The progression rates for CKD at 10 years in the full model cohort were 2.7%, 8.9% and 26.1% for low-, medium- and high-risk groups, and 3.5%, 11.7% and 32.4% in the short model cohort. The AUROC for the full and short risk score was 0.81 (95%CI 0.79-0.83) and 0.83 (95%CI 0.81-0.85), respectively.

    CONCLUSION: The D:A:D CKD full- and short-risk score performed well in predicting CKD events among Asian PLHIV. These risk prediction models may be useful to assist clinicians in identifying individuals at high risk of developing CKD.

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