Displaying publications 1 - 20 of 205 in total

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  1. Talukder S, Capon A, Nath D, Kolb A, Jahan S, Boufford J
    Lancet, 2015 Feb 28;385(9970):769.
    PMID: 25752169 DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(15)60428-7
  2. Bhoo-Pathy N, Pignol JP, Verkooijen HM
    Lancet, 2014 Nov 22;384(9957):1846.
    PMID: 25457914 DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(14)62239-X
  3. Looi LM, Ganten D, McGrath PF, Gross M, Griffin GE
    Lancet, 2015 Mar 14;385(9972):943-4.
    PMID: 25743174 DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(15)60208-2
  4. Masood M, Masood Y, Reidpath DD, Newton T
    Lancet, 2014 Jun 14;383(9934):2046.
    PMID: 24931691 DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(14)60996-X
  5. Touraine M, Gröhe H, Coffie RG, Sathasivam S, Juan M, Louardi el H, et al.
    Lancet, 2014 Sep 27;384(9949):1161-2.
    PMID: 25242037 DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(14)61419-7
  6. Capeding MR, Tran NH, Hadinegoro SR, Ismail HI, Chotpitayasunondh T, Chua MN, et al.
    Lancet, 2014 Oct 11;384(9951):1358-65.
    PMID: 25018116 DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(14)61060-6
    An estimated 100 million people have symptomatic dengue infection every year. This is the first report of a phase 3 vaccine efficacy trial of a candidate dengue vaccine. We aimed to assess the efficacy of the CYD dengue vaccine against symptomatic, virologically confirmed dengue in children.
  7. Shetty P
    Lancet, 2013 May 18;381(9879):1709-10.
    PMID: 23691551
  8. Allotey P, Amazigo U, Adjei S, Seddoh A, Lusamba-Dikassa PS
    Lancet, 2012 Oct 20;380(9851):1361-3.
    PMID: 23084441 DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(12)60723-5
  9. Allotey P, Reidpath DD, Yasin S, Chan CK, de-Graft Aikins A
    Lancet, 2011 Feb 5;377(9764):450-1.
    PMID: 21074257 DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(10)61856-9
  10. Kanchanachitra C, Lindelow M, Johnston T, Hanvoravongchai P, Lorenzo FM, Huong NL, et al.
    Lancet, 2011 Feb 26;377(9767):769-81.
    PMID: 21269674 DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(10)62035-1
    In this paper, we address the issues of shortage and maldistribution of health personnel in southeast Asia in the context of the international trade in health services. Although there is no shortage of health workers in the region overall, when analysed separately, five low-income countries have some deficit. All countries in southeast Asia face problems of maldistribution of health workers, and rural areas are often understaffed. Despite a high capacity for medical and nursing training in both public and private facilities, there is weak coordination between production of health workers and capacity for employment. Regional experiences and policy responses to address these challenges can be used to inform future policy in the region and elsewhere. A distinctive feature of southeast Asia is its engagement in international trade in health services. Singapore and Malaysia import health workers to meet domestic demand and to provide services to international patients. Thailand attracts many foreign patients for health services. This situation has resulted in the so-called brain drain of highly specialised staff from public medical schools to the private hospitals. The Philippines and Indonesia are the main exporters of doctors and nurses in the region. Agreements about mutual recognition of professional qualifications for three groups of health workers under the Association of Southeast Asian Nations Framework Agreement on Services could result in increased movement within the region in the future. To ensure that vital human resources for health are available to meet the needs of the populations that they serve, migration management and retention strategies need to be integrated into ongoing efforts to strengthen health systems in southeast Asia. There is also a need for improved dialogue between the health and trade sectors on how to balance economic opportunities associated with trade in health services with domestic health needs and equity issues.
  11. Tangcharoensathien V, Patcharanarumol W, Ir P, Aljunid SM, Mukti AG, Akkhavong K, et al.
    Lancet, 2011 Mar 5;377(9768):863-73.
    PMID: 21269682 DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(10)61890-9
    In this sixth paper of the Series, we review health-financing reforms in seven countries in southeast Asia that have sought to reduce dependence on out-of-pocket payments, increase pooled health finance, and expand service use as steps towards universal coverage. Laos and Cambodia, both resource-poor countries, have mostly relied on donor-supported health equity funds to reach the poor, and reliable funding and appropriate identification of the eligible poor are two major challenges for nationwide expansion. For Thailand, the Philippines, Indonesia, and Vietnam, social health insurance financed by payroll tax is commonly used for formal sector employees (excluding Malaysia), with varying outcomes in terms of financial protection. Alternative payment methods have different implications for provider behaviour and financial protection. Two alternative approaches for financial protection of the non-poor outside the formal sector have emerged-contributory arrangements and tax-financed schemes-with different abilities to achieve high population coverage rapidly. Fiscal space and mobilisation of payroll contributions are both important in accelerating financial protection. Expanding coverage of good-quality services and ensuring adequate human resources are also important to achieve universal coverage. As health-financing reform is complex, institutional capacity to generate evidence and inform policy is essential and should be strengthened.
  12. Paynter S, Ware RS, Weinstein P, Williams G, Sly PD
    Lancet, 2010 Nov 27;376(9755):1804-5.
    PMID: 21111894 DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(10)62141-1
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