Displaying all 13 publications

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  1. Puvanesuaran VR, Ibrahim N, Noordin R, Balakrishnan V
    Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci, 2012 Sep;16(9):1179-83.
    PMID: 23047500
    AIM: A method was developed to separate contaminant-free viable Toxoplasma gondii cysts from brain samples of infected mice for molecular biology studies and reinfection.
    MATERIALS AND METHODS: The mice brains were homogenized and washed with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) Tween 80 prior to fractionation using 19-22% dextran solution. Finally, the supernatant was purified by two-step membrane filtration (100-160 microm and < 10 microm) to obtain pure T. gondii cyst. The isolates were analyzed through microscopic observation, qPCR and by reinfection of new batch of mice.
    RESULTS: T. gondii cysts were best isolated with 21% dextran solution and two step filtration.
    CONCLUSIONS: The method was observed not to disrupt the integrity of the cysts containing bradyzoites. In addition, the isolated cysts in the filtrate were found to be contaminant-free, viable and able to infect healthy mice when introduced orally; which, mimics the natural infectivity pathway.
    Matched MeSH terms: Brain/parasitology*
  2. Chew WK, Wah MJ, Ambu S, Segarra I
    Exp. Parasitol., 2012 Jan;130(1):22-5.
    PMID: 22027550 DOI: 10.1016/j.exppara.2011.10.004
    Toxoplasma gondii is an intra-cellular parasite that infects humans through vertical and horizontal transmission. The cysts remain dormant in the brain of infected humans and can reactivate in immunocompromised hosts resulting in acute toxoplasmic encephalitis which may be fatal. We determined the onset and progression of brain cysts generation in a mouse model following acute toxoplasmosis as well as the ability of brain cysts to reactivate in vitro. Male Balb/c mice, (uninfected control group, n = 10) were infected orally (study group, n = 50) with 1000 tachyzoites of T. gondii (ME49 strain) and euthanized at 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16 weeks post infection. Brain tissue was harvested, homogenized, stained and the number of brain cysts counted. Aliquots of brain homogenate with cysts were cultured in vitro with confluent Vero cells and the number of cysts and tachyzoites counted after 1 week. Brain cysts but not tachyzoites were detected at week 2 post infection and reached a plateau by week 4. In vitro Vero cells culture showed similar pattern for cysts and tachyzoites and reactivation of cyst in vitro was not influenced by the age of the brain cysts.
    Matched MeSH terms: Brain/parasitology*
  3. Pirehma M, Suresh K, Sivanandam S, Anuar AK, Ramakrishnan K, Kumar GS
    Parasitol. Res., 1999 Oct;85(10):791-3.
    PMID: 10494803
    Acanthamoeba sp. is a free-living amoeba known to cause chronic central nervous system infection or eye infection in humans. Many cases remain undetected for want of a good detection system. We report for the first time a rapid staining method to facilitate the identification of Acanthamoeba sp. using the modified Field's staining technique. A. castellanii, which was used in the present experiment, is maintained in our laboratory in mycological peptone medium (Gibco). The cultures were pooled together and smears were made on glass slides for staining purposes. Different types of stains such as Field's stain, modified Field's stain, Wright's stain, Giemsa stain, Ziehl-Neelsen stain, and trichrome stain were used to determine the best stain for the identification of this amoeba. The concentration of various stains and the duration of staining were varied to provide the best color and contrast for each stain. Acanthamoeba was also obtained from the brain of experimentally infected mice and was stained with various stains as mentioned above to determine the best stain for use in identifying the presence of this parasite in experimentally infected animals. The modified Field's stain gives a very good color contrast as compared with other stains. Furthermore, it takes only 20 s to be carried out using the least number of reagents, making it suitable for both laboratory and field use.
    Matched MeSH terms: Brain/parasitology*
  4. Kamis AB, Ahmad RA, Chang JS, Ambu S
    Parasitol. Res., 1994;80(1):87-8.
    PMID: 8153134
    Daily intramuscular injection with thyroxine (T4) at a dose of 2.5 micrograms/100 g body weight decreased the larvae and adult worm burden of Parastrongylus malaysiensis in the brain and pulmonary arteries of male Sprague-Dawley albino rats. In contrast, rats treated with propyl thiouracil (PTU), an antithyroid drug, at a dose of 3.75 mg/100 g body weight retained greater numbers of larvae and adult worms. The results may reflect the contrasting immunomodulatory effects of T4 and PTU that influence the susceptibility of the host.
    Matched MeSH terms: Brain/parasitology
  5. Ong TYY, Khan NA, Siddiqui R
    J. Clin. Microbiol., 2017 07;55(7):1989-1997.
    PMID: 28404683 DOI: 10.1128/JCM.02300-16
    Acanthamoeba spp. and Balamuthia mandrillaris are causative agents of granulomatous amoebic encephalitis (GAE), while Naegleria fowleri causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). PAM is an acute infection that lasts a few days, while GAE is a chronic to subacute infection that can last up to several months. Here, we present a literature review of 86 case reports from 1968 to 2016, in order to explore the affinity of these amoebae for particular sites of the brain, diagnostic modalities, treatment options, and disease outcomes in a comparative manner.
    Matched MeSH terms: Brain/parasitology*
  6. Mungroo MR, Anwar A, Khan NA, Siddiqui R
    Mini Rev Med Chem, 2019;19(12):980-987.
    PMID: 30868950 DOI: 10.2174/1389557519666190313161854
    Pathogenic free-living amoeba are known to cause a devastating infection of the central nervous system and are often referred to as "brain-eating amoebae". The mortality rate of more than 90% and free-living nature of these amoebae is a cause for concern. It is distressing that the mortality rate has remained the same over the past few decades, highlighting the lack of interest by the pharmaceutical industry. With the threat of global warming and increased outdoor activities of public, there is a need for renewed interest in identifying potential anti-amoebic compounds for successful prognosis. Here, we discuss the available chemotherapeutic options and opportunities for potential strategies in the treatment and diagnosis of these life-threatening infections.
    Matched MeSH terms: Brain/parasitology*
  7. Khaw LT, Ball HJ, Mitchell AJ, Grau GE, Stocker R, Golenser J, et al.
    Exp. Parasitol., 2014 Oct;145:34-41.
    PMID: 25045850 DOI: 10.1016/j.exppara.2014.07.002
    We here describe the novel finding that brain endothelial cells in vitro can stimulate the growth of Plasmodium falciparum through the production of low molecular weight growth factors. By using a conditioned medium approach, we show that the brain endothelial cells continued to release these factors over time. If this mirrors the in vivo situation, these growth factors potentially would provide an advantage, in terms of enhanced growth, for sequestered parasitised red blood cells in the brain microvasculature. We observed this phenomenon with brain endothelial cells from several sources as well as a second P. falciparum strain. The characteristics of the growth factors included: <3 kDa molecular weight, heat stable, and in part chloroform soluble. Future efforts should be directed at identifying these growth factors, since blocking their production or actions might be of benefit for reducing parasite load and, hence, malaria pathology.
    Matched MeSH terms: Brain/parasitology*
  8. Kamis AB, Ahmad RA, Badrul-Munir MZ
    Parasitol. Res., 1994;80(1):74-7.
    PMID: 8153130
    Gonadectomized male laboratory rats were given 0.06 mg/kg estradiol benzoate daily for 14 days before being inoculated with 50 third-stage larvae of Parastrongylus malaysiensis. Hormone treatment was continued until the rats were killed. The numbers of larvae in the brain and of adult worms in the pulmonary area of the rats were determined every 7 days after the inoculation. It was found that the rats treated daily with estradiol benzoate had significantly and consistently higher numbers of larvae and adult worms as compared with the controls. The number of total leukocytes increased significantly after the rats were infected. The results show that estradiol-treated rats become susceptible to P. malaysiensis infection, which may indicate that the immunosuppressive effects of testosterone observed in earlier studies may partly be caused by estradiol that was peripherally aromatized from testosterone.
    Matched MeSH terms: Brain/parasitology
  9. Kamis AB, Ahmad RA, Badrul-Munir MZ
    Parasitol. Res., 1992;78(5):388-91.
    PMID: 1495916
    Gonadectomized male albino rats aged 7 weeks were given 1.5 mg/kg testosterone propionate daily and inoculated with 50 third-stage larvae of Angiostrongylus malaysiensis. The treatment significantly increased the number of larvae and adult worms recovered from the brain and pulmonary arteries, respectively, and the rats exhibited smaller thymus glands. The total numbers of leukocytes, monocytes, neutrophils, and especially eosinophils increased significantly post-infection, but the counts were higher in the untreated infected controls. Presumably, immunosuppressive effects of testosterone may at least partly be responsible for the higher loads of A. malaysiensis worms found in male rats as compared with females in the field.
    Matched MeSH terms: Brain/parasitology
  10. Puvanesuaran VR, Noordin R, Balakrishnan V
    Avian Dis., 2013 Mar;57(1):128-32.
    PMID: 23678741
    Toxoplasma gondii is a parasitic protozoan that infects nearly one-third of humans. The present study was performed to isolate and genotype T. gondii from free-range ducks in Malaysia. Sera, heads, and hearts from 205 ducks were obtained from four states in Peninsular Malaysia, and 30 (14.63%) sera were found to be seropositive when assayed with the modified agglutination test (MAT > or = 1:6). All the positive samples were inoculated into mice, and T. gondii was successfully isolated from four individual duck samples (1.95%), which were initially found to be strongly seropositive (MAT > or = 1:24). The isolates were subjected to PCR-RFLP analysis, and two T. gondii strains were identified: type I and type II. This is the first reported study on the genetic characterization of T. gondii isolates from free-range farm animals in Southeast Asia.
    Matched MeSH terms: Brain/parasitology
  11. Rahumatullah A, Khoo BY, Noordin R
    Exp. Parasitol., 2012 Jun;131(2):231-8.
    PMID: 22561042 DOI: 10.1016/j.exppara.2012.04.009
    Molecular methods are used increasingly for the detection of Toxoplasma gondii infection. This study developed a rapid, sensitive, and specific conventional triplex PCR for the detection of the B1 gene and ITS1 region of T. gondii using newly designed primers and an internal control based on the Vibrio cholerae HemM gene. The annealing temperature and concentrations of the primers, MgCl(2), and dNTPs were optimized. Two sets of primers (set 1 and 2) were tested, which contained different segments of the T. gondii B1 gene, 529 repeat region and ITS1 region. A series of sensitivity tests were performed using parasite DNA, whole parasites, and spiked human body fluids. Specificity tests were performed using DNA from common protozoa and bacteria. The newly developed assay based on set 2 primers was found to be specific and sensitive. The test was capable of detecting as little as 10 pg T. gondii DNA, 10(4) tachyzoites in spiked body fluids, and T. gondii DNA in the organ tissues of experimentally infected mice. The assay developed in this study will be useful for the laboratory detection of T. gondii infection.
    Matched MeSH terms: Brain/parasitology
  12. Chew WK, Segarra I, Ambu S, Mak JW
    Antimicrob. Agents Chemother., 2012 Apr;56(4):1762-8.
    PMID: 22271863 DOI: 10.1128/AAC.05183-11
    Toxoplasma gondii is a parasite that generates latent cysts in the brain; reactivation of these cysts may lead to fatal toxoplasmic encephalitis, for which treatment remains unsuccessful. We assessed spiramycin pharmacokinetics coadministered with metronidazole, the eradication of brain cysts and the in vitro reactivation. Male BALB/c mice were fed 1,000 tachyzoites orally to develop chronic toxoplasmosis. Four weeks later, infected mice underwent different treatments: (i) infected untreated mice (n = 9), which received vehicle only; (ii) a spiramycin-only group (n = 9), 400 mg/kg daily for 7 days; (iii) a metronidazole-only group (n = 9), 500 mg/kg daily for 7 days; and (iv) a combination group (n = 9), which received both spiramycin (400 mg/kg) and metronidazole (500 mg/kg) daily for 7 days. An uninfected control group (n = 10) was administered vehicle only. After treatment, the brain cysts were counted, brain homogenates were cultured in confluent Vero cells, and cysts and tachyzoites were counted after 1 week. Separately, pharmacokinetic profiles (plasma and brain) were assessed after a single dose of spiramycin (400 mg/kg), metronidazole (500 mg/kg), or both. Metronidazole treatment increased the brain spiramycin area under the concentration-time curve from 0 h to ∞ (AUC(0-∞)) by 67% without affecting its plasma disposition. Metronidazole plasma and brain AUC(0-∞) values were reduced 9 and 62%, respectively, after spiramycin coadministration. Enhanced spiramycin brain exposure after coadministration reduced brain cysts 15-fold (79 ± 23 for the combination treatment versus 1,198 ± 153 for the untreated control group [P < 0.05]) and 10-fold versus the spiramycin-only group (768 ± 125). Metronidazole alone showed no effect (1,028 ± 149). Tachyzoites were absent in the brain. Spiramycin reduced in vitro reactivation. Metronidazole increased spiramycin brain penetration, causing a significant reduction of T. gondii brain cysts, with potential clinical translatability for chronic toxoplasmosis treatment.
    Matched MeSH terms: Brain/parasitology
  13. Gabriel S, Rasheed AK, Siddiqui R, Appaturi JN, Fen LB, Khan NA
    Parasitol. Res., 2018 Jun;117(6):1801-1811.
    PMID: 29675682 DOI: 10.1007/s00436-018-5864-0
    Brain-eating amoebae (Acanthamoeba spp., Balamuthia mandrillaris, Naegleria fowleri) have gained increasing attention owing to their capacity to produce severe human and animal infections involving the brain. Early detection is a pre-requisite in successful prognosis. Here, we developed a nanoPCR assay for the rapid detection of brain-eating amoebae using various nanoparticles. Graphene oxide, copper and alumina nanoparticles used in this study were characterized using Raman spectroscopy measurements through excitation with a He-Ne laser, while powder X-ray diffraction patterns were taken on a PANanalytical, X'Pert HighScore diffractometer and the morphology of the materials was confirmed using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Using nanoparticle-assisted PCR, the results revealed that graphene oxide, copper oxide and alumina nanoparticles significantly enhanced PCR efficiency in the detection of pathogenic free-living amoebae using genus-specific probes. The optimal concentration of graphene oxide, copper oxide and alumina nanoparticles for Acanthamoeba spp. was determined at 0.4, 0.04 and 0.4 μg per mL respectively. For B. mandrillaris, the optimal concentration was determined at 0.4 μg per mL for graphene oxide, copper oxide and alumina nanoparticles, and for Naegleria, the optimal concentration was 0.04, 4.0 and 0.04 μg per mL respectively. Moreover, combinations of these nanoparticles proved to further enhance PCR efficiency. The addition of metal oxide nanoparticles leads to excellent surface effect, while thermal conductivity property of the nanoparticles enhances PCR productivity. These findings suggest that nanoPCR assay has tremendous potential in the clinical diagnosis of parasitic infections as well as for studying epidemiology and pathology and environmental monitoring of other microbes.
    Matched MeSH terms: Brain/parasitology
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