Displaying publications 1 - 20 of 42 in total

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  1. Yan L, Zhang M, Wang M, Guo Y, Zhang X, Xi J, et al.
    J Nanosci Nanotechnol, 2020 03 01;20(3):1504-1510.
    PMID: 31492313 DOI: 10.1166/jnn.2020.17350
    This research has been accomplished using the advanced selective laser melting (SLM) technique as well as HIP post-treatment in order to improve mechanical properties and biocompatibility of Mg- Ca-Sr alloy. Through this research it becomes clearly noticeable that the Mg-1.5Ca-xSr (x = 0.6, 2.1, 2.5) alloys with Sr exhibited better mechanical properties and corrosion potentials. This is more particular with the Mg-1.5Ca-2.5Sr alloy after HIP post-treatment allowing it to provide a desired combination of degradation and mechanical behavior for orthopedic fracture fixation during a desired treatment period. In vivo trials, there was a clear indication and exhibition that this Mg-1.5Ca-2.5Sr alloy screw can completely dissolve in miniature pig's body which leads to an acceleration in growth of bone tissues. Mg-Ca-Sr alloy proved potential candidate for use in orthopedic fixation devices through Our results concluded that Mg-Ca-Sr alloy are potential candidate for use in orthopedic fixation devices through mechanical strength and biocompatibility evaluations (in vitro or In vivo).
    Matched MeSH terms: Absorbable Implants*
  2. Michael FM, Khalid M, Walvekar R, Ratnam CT, Ramarad S, Siddiqui H, et al.
    Mater Sci Eng C Mater Biol Appl, 2016 Oct 01;67:792-806.
    PMID: 27287178 DOI: 10.1016/j.msec.2016.05.037
    Bones are nanocomposites consisting of a collagenous fibre network, embedded with calcium phosphates mainly hydroxyapatite (HA) nanocrystallites. As bones are subjected to continuous loading and unloading process every day, they often tend to become prone to fatigue and breakdown. Therefore, this review addresses the use of nanocomposites particularly polymers reinforced with nanoceramics that can be used as load bearing bone implants. Further, nanocomposite preparation and dispersion modification techniques have been highlighted along with thorough discussion on the influence that various nanofillers have on the physico-mechanical properties of nanocomposites in relation to that of natural bone properties. This review updates the nanocomposites that meet the physico-mechanical properties (strength and elasticity) as well as biocompatibility requirement of a load bearing bone implant and also attempts to highlight the gaps in the reported studies to address the fatigue and creep properties of the nanocomposites.
    Matched MeSH terms: Absorbable Implants*
  3. Alavi R, Akbarzadeh AH, Hermawan H
    J Mech Behav Biomed Mater, 2021 05;117:104413.
    PMID: 33640846 DOI: 10.1016/j.jmbbm.2021.104413
    In-depth analyses of post-corrosion mechanical properties and architecture of open cell iron foams with hollow struts as absorbable bone scaffolds were carried out. Variations in the architectural features of the foams after 14 days of immersion in a Hanks' solution were investigated using micro-computed tomography and scanning electron microscope images. Finite element Kelvin foam model was developed, and the numerical modeling and experimental results were compared against each other. It was observed that the iron foam samples were mostly corroded in the periphery regions. Except for quasi-elastic gradient, other mechanical properties (i.e. compressive strength, yield strength and energy absorbability) decreased monotonically with immersion time. Presence of adherent corrosion products enhanced the load-bearing capacity of the open cell iron foams at small strains. The finite element prediction for the quasi-elastic response of the 14-day corroded foam was in an agreement with the experimental results. This study highlights the importance of considering corrosion mechanism when designing absorbable scaffolds; this is indispensable to offer desirable mechanical properties in porous materials during degradation in a biological environment.
    Matched MeSH terms: Absorbable Implants*
  4. Fadilah A, Zuki AB, Loqman MY, Zamri-Saad M, Al-Salihi KA, Norimah Y, et al.
    Med J Malaysia, 2004 May;59 Suppl B:127-8.
    PMID: 15468851
    The study was carried out with the aim to evaluate natural coral (Porites spp.) implanted in sheep femur microscopically. Twelve adult, male sheep were used in this study. The defect area was implanted with coral and monitored for up to 12 weeks. The sheep were euthanased at 2,4,8, and 12 weeks post-implantation. Microscopically, natural coral implanted into bone tissue have shown gradual resorption and progressively replaced by new bone. At 12 weeks post-implantation, the implanted site was almost completely surrounded by mature bone. The results showed that natural coral was found to be a biodegradable and osteo-conductive biomaterial, which acted as a scaffold for a direct osteoblastic apposition.
    Matched MeSH terms: Absorbable Implants*
  5. Sudesh K
    Med J Malaysia, 2004 May;59 Suppl B:55-6.
    PMID: 15468816
    Among the various biomaterials available for tissue engineering and therapeutic applications, microbial polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) offer the most diverse range of thermal and mechanical properties. Of particular interest are the PHAs that contain 4-hydroxybutyrate such as poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate) [P(3HB-co-4HB) and poly(4-hydroxybutyrate) [P(4HB)]. These polyesters can only be synthesized by a few types of bacteria, among which Comamonas acidovorans has the most efficient metabolic pathways to channel 4HB monomers. The resulting polyesters are bioabsorbable and are being developed as a new biomaterial for medical applications. By controlling the molar ratio of the monomers, it is possible to produce materials that are as tough and elastic as rubber.
    Matched MeSH terms: Absorbable Implants*
  6. Yakub MA, Sivalingam S, Dillon J, Matsuhama M, Latiff HA, Ramli MF
    Ann Thorac Surg, 2015 Mar;99(3):884-90; discussion 890.
    PMID: 25579160 DOI: 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2014.09.016
    This study compares the midterm results of mitral valve repair using the biodegradable ring versus repair with non-ring annuloplasty techniques for congenital mitral valve disease in young children where it was not possible to use standard commercial rings.
    Matched MeSH terms: Absorbable Implants*
  7. Hermawan H, Mantovani D
    Acta Biomater, 2013 Nov;9(10):8585-92.
    PMID: 23665503 DOI: 10.1016/j.actbio.2013.04.027
    Biodegradable stents are considered to be a recent innovation, and their feasibility and applicability have been proven in recent years. Research in this area has focused on materials development and biological studies, rather than on how to transform the developed biodegradable materials into the stent itself. Currently available stent technology, the laser cutting-based process, might be adapted to fabricate biodegradable stents. In this work, the fabrication, characterization and testing of biodegradable Fe-Mn stents are described. A standard process for fabricating and testing stainless steel 316L stents was referred to. The influence of process parameters on the physical, metallurgical and mechanical properties of the stents, and the quality of the produced stents, were investigated. It was found that some steps of the standard process such as laser cutting can be directly applied, but changes to parameters are needed for annealing, and alternatives are needed to replace electropolishing.
    Matched MeSH terms: Absorbable Implants*
  8. Muhammad KB, Abas WA, Kim KH, Pingguan-Murphy B, Zain NM, Akram H
    Clinics (Sao Paulo), 2012;67(6):629-38.
    PMID: 22760903
    OBJECTIVE: Dark poly(caprolactone) trifumarate is a successful candidate for use as a bone tissue engineering scaffold. Recently, a white polymeric scaffold was developed that shows a shorter synthesis time and is more convenient for tissue-staining work. This is an in vitro comparative study of both the white and dark scaffolds.

    METHODS: Both white and dark poly(caprolactone) trifumarate macromers were characterized via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy before being chemically cross-linked and molded into disc-shaped scaffolds. Biodegradability was assessed by percentage weight loss on days 7, 14, 28, 42 and 56 (n = 5) after immersion in 10% serum-supplemented medium or distilled water. Static cell seeding was employed in which isolated and characterized rat bone marrow stromal cells were seeded directly onto the scaffold surface. Seeded scaffolds were subjected to a series of biochemical assays and scanning electron microscopy at specified time intervals for up to 28 days of incubation.

    RESULTS: The degradation of the white scaffold was significantly lower compared with the dark scaffold but was within the acceptable time range for bone-healing processes. The deoxyribonucleic acid and collagen contents increased up to day 28 with no significant difference between the two scaffolds, but the glycosaminoglycan content was slightly higher in the white scaffold throughout 14 days of incubation. Scanning electron microscopy at day 1 [corrected] revealed cellular growth and attachment.

    CONCLUSIONS: There was no cell growth advantage between the two forms, but the white scaffold had a slower biodegradability rate, suggesting that the newly synthesized poly(caprolactone) trifumarate is more suitable for use as a bone tissue engineering scaffold.

    Matched MeSH terms: Absorbable Implants*
  9. Siar CH, Toh CG, Romanos G, Ng KH
    Clin Oral Implants Res, 2011 Jan;22(1):113-20.
    PMID: 20678135 DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0501.2010.01970.x
    collagenous and noncollagenous membranes have been investigated in many animal systems but their effects in the macaque model are unknown.
    Matched MeSH terms: Absorbable Implants*
  10. Fadilah A, Zuki AB, Loqman MY, Zamri-Saad M, Norimah Y, Asnah H
    Med J Malaysia, 2004 May;59 Suppl B:178-9.
    PMID: 15468876
    The study was carried out to evaluate macroscopically the ability of coral to repair a large size bone defect. A total 12 adult, male sheep were used in the study. The large bone defect (2.5cm x 0.5cm x 0.5cm) was created surgically on the left proximal femur and replaced by a block of coral (Porites sp.). Radiographs were obtained immediately after surgery and at 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks post-implantation. Ultrasonographic examinations were carried out every 2 weeks after implantation up to 12 weeks using ultrasound machine (TOSHIBA Capasee II) connected with 7MHz frequency transducer. The sheep were euthanased at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks post-implantation and the bone examined grossly. Both ultrasonographs and radiographs taken at 8 and 12 weeks showed that the implants had been resorbed and left the space that much reduced in size. There was no sign of implant rejection observed in all animals. The results showed that processed coral has potential to become bone substitute for reconstructive bone surgery.
    Matched MeSH terms: Absorbable Implants*
  11. Pohchi A, Suzina AH, Samsudin AR, Al-Salihi KA
    Med J Malaysia, 2004 May;59 Suppl B:151-2.
    PMID: 15468863
    This in vivo study revealed that porous hydroxyapatite (PHA) and dense hydroxyapatite (DHA) are good implant materials that can accelerate bone healing and resorbed in acceptable time. But there were differences in the mechanism of the resorption of DHA and PHA due to variability in the physical properties and osteogenicity.
    Matched MeSH terms: Absorbable Implants*
  12. Rosdan S, Al-Salihi KA, Suzina AH, Samsudin AR
    Med J Malaysia, 2004 May;59 Suppl B:111-2.
    PMID: 15468843
    The main objective of the study was to determine the biodegradability, resorption and osteoconductivity potency of coral implant. Coral blocks (CORAGRAF) were prepared from sea coral Porites species. The blocks were implanted in the right mandible of rabbit model. Implants were harvested at 2 and 4 weeks intervals and subjected for light and scanning electron microscopy. Dense hydroxyapatite (DHA) was implanted in the left mandible as a control. The results of this study demonstrated that CORAGRAF is a good implant material that can accelerates bone healing and be resorbed in an acceptable time. The mechanisms of the resorption seemed to be the same (crumbling process), a first step where the edge of the coral become powdery then a second step which could be phagocytosis and dissolution in extracellular fluid.
    Matched MeSH terms: Absorbable Implants*
  13. Ginebra MP, Aparicio C, Engel E, Navarro M, Javier Gil F, Planell JA
    Med J Malaysia, 2004 May;59 Suppl B:65-6.
    PMID: 15468821
    Matched MeSH terms: Absorbable Implants*
  14. Nather A
    Med J Malaysia, 2004 May;59 Suppl B:37-8.
    PMID: 15468807
    Matched MeSH terms: Absorbable Implants*
  15. Dambatta MS, Murni NS, Izman S, Kurniawan D, Froemming GR, Hermawan H
    Proc Inst Mech Eng H, 2015 May;229(5):335-42.
    PMID: 25991712 DOI: 10.1177/0954411915584962
    This article reports the in vitro degradation and cytotoxicity assessment of Zn-3Mg alloy developed for biodegradable bone implants. The alloy was prepared using casting, and its microstructure was composed of Mg2Zn11 intermetallic phase distributed within a Zn-rich matrix. The degradation assessment was done using potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectrometry. The cell viability and the function of normal human osteoblast cells were assessed using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium and alkaline phosphatase extracellular enzyme activity assays. The results showed that the degradation rate of the alloy was slower than those of pure Zn and pure Mg due to the formation of a high polarization resistance oxide film. The alloy was cytocompatible with the normal human osteoblast cells at low concentrations (<0.5 mg/mL), and its alkaline phosphatase activity was superior to pure Mg. This assessment suggests that Zn-3Mg alloy has the potential to be developed as a material for biodegradable bone implants, but the toxicity limit must be carefully observed.
    Matched MeSH terms: Absorbable Implants*
  16. Chanana BB, Chandra P, Cheng JJ, Dick R, Gwon HC, Hiremath MS, et al.
    Int J Cardiol, 2016 Nov 01;222:832-40.
    PMID: 27522385 DOI: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2016.07.273
    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Although Absorb Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffolds (A-BVS) are routinely used in the Asia-Pacific, there is little information on patient selection or deployment technique here. This document investigates the experiences of leading interventional cardiologists from the Asia-Pacific region with a focus on patient characteristics, deployment techniques and management.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: A detailed questionnaire was distributed to 28 highly-experienced interventional cardiologists ('Authors') from 13 Asia-Pacific countries. The results were discussed at a meeting on patient selection, technical consideration, deployment practices and patient management. Potential patient benefits of Absorb compared to metallic DES, the learning curve for patient selection and preparation, device deployment, and subsequent patient management approaches are presented.

    CONCLUSIONS: Current practices are derived from guidelines optimized for European patients. Differences in approach exist in the Asia-Pacific context, including limited access to imaging and frequency of occurrence of complex lesions. Nevertheless, the use of the Absorb BVS ('Absorb') in certain Asia-Pacific countries has flourished and practices here are continuing to mature.

    Matched MeSH terms: Absorbable Implants/utilization*
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