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  1. Anbu JS, Jayaraj P, Varatharajan R, Thomas J, Jisha J, Muthappan M
    Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med, 2009 Jul 03;6(4):529-33.
    PMID: 20606773
    The ethanol and water extracts of Sansevieria trifasciata leaves showed dose-dependent and significant (P < 0.05) increase in pain threshold in tail-immersion test. Moreover, both the extracts (100 - 200 mg/kg) exhibited a dose-dependent inhibition of writhing and also showed a significant (P < 0.001) inhibition of both phases of the formalin pain test. The ethanol extract (200 mg/kg) significantly (P < 0.01) reversed yeast-induced fever. Preliminary phytochemical screening of the extracts showed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, saponins, glycosides, terpenoids, tannins, proteins and carbohydrates.
    Matched MeSH terms: Analgesics, Non-Narcotic/pharmacology*
  2. Zakaria ZA, Sulaiman MR, Morsid NA, Aris A, Zainal H, Pojan NH, et al.
    Methods Find Exp Clin Pharmacol, 2009 Mar;31(2):81-8.
    PMID: 19455262 DOI: 10.1358/mf.2009.31.2.1353876
    The present study was carried out to evaluate the antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic effects of the aqueous extract of Solanum nigrum leaves using various animal models. The extract, at concentrations of 10, 50 and 100%, was prepared by soaking (1:20; w/v) air-dried powdered leaves (20 g) in distilled water (dH2O) for 72 h. The extract solutions were administered subcutaneously in mice/rats 30 min prior to the tests. The extract exhibited significant (P < 0.05) antinociceptive activity when assessed using the abdominal constriction, hot plate and formalin tests. The extract also produced significant (P < 0.05) anti-inflammatory and antipyretic activities when assessed using the carrageenan-induced paw edema and brewer's yeast-induced pyrexia tests, respectively. Overall, these activities occurred in a concentration-dependent manner, except for the 50% concentration of the extract, which was not effective in the abdominal constriction test. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that S. nigrum leaves possessed antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic effects and thus supported traditional claims of its medicinal uses.
    Matched MeSH terms: Analgesics, Non-Narcotic/pharmacology
  3. Tan SY, Wong MM, Tiew AL, Choo YW, Lim SH, Ooi IH, et al.
    Cancer Chemother. Pharmacol., 2016 10;78(4):709-18.
    PMID: 27495788 DOI: 10.1007/s00280-016-3120-9
    PURPOSE: Pharmacokinetic interaction of sunitinib with diclofenac, paracetamol, mefenamic acid and ibuprofen was evaluated due to their P450 mediated metabolism and OATP1B1, OATP1B3, ABCB1, ABCG2 transporters overlapping features.

    METHODS: Male and female mice were administered 6 sunitinib doses (60 mg/kg) PO every 12 h and 30 min before the last dose were administered vehicle (control groups), 250 mg/kg paracetamol, 30 mg/kg diclofenac, 50 mg/kg mefenamic acid or 30 mg/kg ibuprofen (study groups), euthanized 6 h post last administration and sunitinib plasma, liver, kidney, brain concentrations analyzed.

    RESULTS: Ibuprofen halved sunitinib plasma concentration in female mice (p 

    Matched MeSH terms: Analgesics, Non-Narcotic/pharmacology*
  4. Liew MH, Ng S, Chew CC, Koo TW, Chee YL, Chee EL, et al.
    Invest New Drugs, 2017 04;35(2):145-157.
    PMID: 28070719 DOI: 10.1007/s10637-016-0415-y
    The sex-divergent pharmacokinetics and interaction of tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib with paracetamol was evaluated in male and female mice. Mice (control groups) were administered 60 mg/kg PO sunitinib alone or with 200 mg/kg PO paracetamol (study groups). Sunitinib concentration in plasma, brain, kidney and liver were determined and non-compartmental pharmacokinetic analysis performed. Female control mice showed 36% higher plasma sunitinib AUC0→∞, 31% and 27% lower liver and kidney AUC0→∞ and 2.2-fold higher AUC0→∞ in brain (all p 
    Matched MeSH terms: Analgesics, Non-Narcotic/pharmacology*
  5. Shariffuddin II, Teoh WH, Wahab S, Wang CY
    BMC Anesthesiol, 2018 01 05;18(1):3.
    PMID: 29304735 DOI: 10.1186/s12871-017-0464-6
    BACKGROUND: Ambulatory surgery has recently gain popularity, as it is a good method of optimizinghospital resources utilization. To support ambulatory surgery, anaesthetic goals nowrevolve around patients' early recovery with minimal pain and nausea, expedientdischarge home and prompt resumption of activities of daily living. In this study, weevaluated the effect of a single pre-induction dose of dexmedetomidine on anaestheticrequirements, postoperative pain and clinical recovery after ambulatory ureteroscopy andureteric stenting under general anaesthesia.

    METHODS: Sixty patients were randomised to receive IV dexmedetomidine 0.5 μg.kg-1 (Group DEX, n = 30) or IV saline (Group P, n = 30). General anaesthesia was maintained with Sevoflurane: oxygen: air, titrated to BIS 40-60. Pain intensity, sedation, rescue analgesics, nausea/vomiting and resumption of daily activities were recorded at 1 h, and postoperative day (POD) 1-5.

    RESULTS: Group DEX patients had significant reduction in sevoflurane minimum alveolar concentration (MAC), mean (SD) DEX vs. Placebo 0.6 (0.2) vs. 0.9 (0.1), p = 0.037; reduced postoperative resting pain at 1 h (VAS 0-10) (mean (SD) 1.00 (1.84) vs. 2.63 (2.78), p = 0.004), POD 1 (mean (SD) 1.50 (1.48) vs. 2.87 (2.72), p = 0.002), POD 2 (0.53 (0.97) vs. 1.73 (1.96), p = 0.001) and POD 3 (0.30 (0.75) vs. 0.89 (1.49), p = 0.001). DEX patients also had less pain on movement POD 1 (3.00 (2.12) vs. 4.30 (3.10), p = 0.043) and POD 2 (2.10 (1.98) vs. 3.10 (2.46), p = 0.040), with higher resumption of daily activities by 48 h compared to placebo, 87% vs. 63%, p = 0.04.

    CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that a single dose of dexmedetomidine was a useful adjuvant in reducing MAC and postoperative pain (at 1 h and POD 1-3), facilitating faster return to daily activities by 48 h.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: The Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR), ACTRN12617001120369 , 31st July 2017, retrospectively registered.

    Matched MeSH terms: Analgesics, Non-Narcotic/pharmacology
  6. Sulaiman MR, Zakaria ZA, Daud IA, Ng FN, Ng YC, Hidayat MT
    J Nat Med, 2008 Apr;62(2):221-7.
    PMID: 18404328 DOI: 10.1007/s11418-007-0210-3
    This study was performed to determine the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of aqueous extract of Kaempferia galanga leaves using various animal models. The extract, in the doses of 30, 100, and 300 mg/kg, was prepared by soaking (1:10; w/v) the air-dried powdered leaves (40 g) in distilled water (dH(2)O) for 72 h and administered subcutaneously in mice/rats 30 min prior to the tests. The extract exhibited significant (P < 0.05) antinociceptive activity when assessed using the abdominal constriction, hot-plate and formalin tests, with activity observed in all tests occurring in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the antinociceptive activity of K. galanga extract was significantly (P < 0.05) reversed when prechallenged with 10 mg/kg naloxone. The extract also produced a significantly (P < 0.05) dose-dependent anti-inflammatory activity when assessed using the carrageenan-induced paw-edema test. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that K. galanga leaves possessed antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities and thus supports the Malay's traditional uses of the plant for treatments of mouth ulcer, headache, sore throat, etc.
    Matched MeSH terms: Analgesics, Non-Narcotic/pharmacology
  7. Zakaria ZA, Ghani ZD, Nor RN, Gopalan HK, Sulaiman MR, Jais AM, et al.
    J Nat Med, 2008 Apr;62(2):179-87.
    PMID: 18404320 DOI: 10.1007/s11418-007-0224-x
    This study was performed out to establish the antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic properties of an aqueous extract of Dicranopteris linearis leaves in experimental animals. The antinociceptive activity was measured using the abdominal constriction, hot plate, and formalin tests. The anti-inflammatory and antipyretic activities were measured using the carrageenan-induced paw edema and brewer's yeast-induced pyrexia tests, respectively. The extract, obtained after 72 h soaking of the air-dried leaves in distilled water and then prepared in the doses of 13.2, 66.0, 132.0, and 660.0 mg/kg, was administered subcutaneously 30 min before subjecting the animals to the assays mentioned above. Generally, the extract, at all doses used, was found to have significant (P < 0.05) concentration-independent antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory, and anti-pyretic activity. In conclusion, the aqueous extract of D. linearis has antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic activity, supporting previous claims of its traditional use by the Malays to treat various ailments, particularly fever.
    Matched MeSH terms: Analgesics, Non-Narcotic/pharmacology
  8. Sulaiman MR, Zakaria ZA, Kamaruddin A, Meng TF, Ali DI, Moin S
    Methods Find Exp Clin Pharmacol, 2008 Nov;30(9):691-6.
    PMID: 19229377 DOI: 10.1358/mf.2008.30.9.1305824
    Trigonopleura malayana L. (Euphorbiaceae) resin, locally known as Gambir Sarawak, has been used traditionally to alleviate pain associated with insect bites, muscle ache, toothache and minor injuries. The present study was carried out using various animal models to determine the antinociceptive and antiinflammatory activities of the T. malayana resin aqueous extract. Antinociceptive activity was measured using the abdominal constriction, hot plate and formalin tests, while antiinflammatory activity was measured using the carrageenan-induced paw edema test. The extract, obtained after 24 h of soaking the dried resin in distilled water, was prepared in doses of 0.3, 3 and 10 mg/kg and administered subcutaneously 30 min prior to the assays. The mechanism of action was also determined by prechallenging with naloxone (10 mg/kg), a nonselective opioid antagonist. The extract was found to exhibit significant (P < 0.05) and dose-dependent antinociceptive and antiinflammatory activities; naloxone failed to inhibit the former activity. In conclusion, the aqueous extract of T. malayana resin possesses nonopioid antinociceptive and antiinflammatory activities, thus supporting previous claims regarding its traditional use by the Malays to treat various ailments, particularly those related to pain.
    Matched MeSH terms: Analgesics, Non-Narcotic/pharmacology
  9. Zakaria ZA, Abdul Rahim MH, Roosli RAJ, Mohd Sani MH, Marmaya NH, Omar MH, et al.
    Biomed Res Int, 2019;2019:6593125.
    PMID: 31467905 DOI: 10.1155/2019/6593125
    Methanolic extract of Clinacanthus nutans Lindau leaves (MECN) has been reported to exert antinociceptive activity. The present study aimed to elucidate the possible antinociceptive mechanisms of a lipid-soluble fraction of MECN, which was obtained after sequential extraction in petroleum ether. The petroleum ether fraction of C. nutans (PECN), administered orally to mice, was (i) subjected to capsaicin-, glutamate-, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-, bradykinin-induced nociception model; (ii) prechallenged (intraperitoneal (i.p.)) with 0.15 mg/kg yohimbine, 1 mg/kg pindolol, 3 mg/kg caffeine, 0.2 mg/kg haloperidol, or 10 mg/kg atropine, which were the respective antagonist of α2-adrenergic, β-adrenergic, adenosinergic, dopaminergic, or muscarinic receptors; and (iii) prechallenged (i.p.) with 10 mg/kg glibenclamide, 0.04 mg/kg apamin, 0.02 mg/kg charybdotoxin, or 4 mg/kg tetraethylammonium chloride, which were the respective inhibitor of ATP sensitive-, small conductance Ca2+-activated-, large conductance Ca2+-activated-, or nonselective voltage-activated-K+ channel. Results obtained demonstrated that PECN (100, 250, and 500 mg/kg) significantly (P<0.05) inhibited all models of nociception described earlier. The antinociceptive activity of 500 mg/kg PECN was significantly (P<0.05) attenuated when prechallenged with all antagonists or K+ channel blockers. However, only pretreatment with apamin and charybdotoxin caused full inhibition of PECN-induced antinociception. The rest of the K+ channel blockers and all antagonists caused only partial inhibition of PECN antinociception, respectively. Analyses on PECN's phytoconstituents revealed the presence of antinociceptive-bearing bioactive compounds of volatile (i.e., derivatives of γ-tocopherol, α-tocopherol, and lupeol) and nonvolatile (i.e., cinnamic acid) nature. In conclusion, PECN exerts a non-opioid-mediated antinociceptive activity involving mainly activation of adenosinergic and cholinergic receptors or small- and large-conductance Ca2+-activated-K+ channels.
    Matched MeSH terms: Analgesics, Non-Narcotic/pharmacology
  10. Zakaria ZA, Raden Mohd Nor RN, Hanan Kumar G, Abdul Ghani ZD, Sulaiman MR, Rathna Devi G, et al.
    Can J Physiol Pharmacol, 2006 Dec;84(12):1291-9.
    PMID: 17487238
    The present study was carried out to establish the antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic properties of the aqueous extract of Melastoma malabathricum leaves in experimental animals. The antinociceptive activity was measured using abdominal constriction, hot-plate, and formalin tests, whereas the anti-inflammatory and antipyretic activities were measured using carrageenan-induced paw edema and brewer's yeast-induced pyrexia tests, respectively. The extract, which was obtained after soaking the air-dried leaves in distilled water for 72 h and then preparing in concentrations of 10%, 50%, and 100% (v/v), was administered subcutaneously 30 min prior to subjection to the above mentioned assays. At all concentrations tested, the extract was found to exhibit significant (P < 0.05) antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic activities in a concentration-independent manner. Our findings that the aqueous extract of M. malabathricum possesses antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic activities supports previous claims on its traditional uses to treat various ailments.
    Matched MeSH terms: Analgesics, Non-Narcotic/pharmacology*
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