Displaying all 13 publications

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  1. Reza F, Lim SP
    J Conserv Dent, 2012 Apr;15(2):123-6.
    PMID: 22557808 DOI: 10.4103/0972-0707.94576
    To compare push-out bond strength between self-cured and dual-cured resin cement using a titanium post.
    Matched MeSH terms: Dentin-Bonding Agents
  2. Ghazali FB
    Malays J Med Sci, 2003 Jan;10(1):27-36.
    PMID: 23365497 MyJurnal
    This is an update on the present integrated knowledge regarding dentine permeability that assumed a role in dentine sensitivity and contribute clinically to the effective bonding properties of restorative dental materials. This paper will attempt to refer to in vivo and in vitro studies of dentine permeability and the various interrelated factors governing it.
    Matched MeSH terms: Dentin-Bonding Agents
  3. Fawzy AS, Daood U, Matinlinna JP
    Dent Mater, 2019 07;35(7):979-989.
    PMID: 31003759 DOI: 10.1016/j.dental.2019.04.001
    OBJECTIVE: This study introduced the potential and proof-of-concept of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) technology for dentin-surface treatment for resin-dentin bonding without acid-aided demineralization. This new strategy could provide a way to enhance interface-integrity and bond-durability by changing the nature of dentin-substrate; bonded-interface structure and properties; and minimizing denuded-collagen exposure.

    METHODS: The interaction between HIFU waves and dentin-surface in terms of structural, mechanical and chemical variations were investigated by SEM, TEM, AFM, nano-indentation and Raman-analysis. The bonding between HIFU-treated dentin and two-step, etch-and-rinse, adhesive was preliminary explored by characterizing dentin-bound proteases activities, resin-dentin interfacial morphology and bond-durability with HIFU exposure at different time-points of 60, 90 and 120 s compared to conventional acid-etching technique.

    RESULTS: With the increase in HIFU exposure-time from 60-to-120 s, HIFU waves were able to remove the smear-layer, expose dentinal-tubules and creating textured/rough dentin surface. In addition, dentin surfaces showed a pattern of interlocking ribbon-like minerals-coated collagen-fibrils protruding from the underlaying amorphous dentin-background with HIFU exposure for 90 s and 120 s. This characteristic pattern of dentin-surface showing inorganic-minerals associated/aligned with collagen-fibrils, with 90-to-120 s HIFU-treatment, was confirmed by the Raman-analysis. HIFU-treated specimens showed higher nano-indentation properties and lower concentrations of active MMP-2 and Cathepsin-K compared to the acid-etched specimens. The resin-dentin bonded interface revealed the partial/complete absence of the characteristic hybrid-layer formed with conventional etch-and-rinse bonding strategy. Additionally, resin-infiltration and resin-tags formation were enhanced with the increase in HIFU exposure-time to 120 s. Although, all groups showed significant decrease in bond-strength after 12 months compared to 24 h storage in artificial saliva, groups exposed to HIFU for 90 s and 120 s showed significantly higher μTBS compared to the control acid-etched group.

    SIGNIFICANCE: The implementation of HIFU-technology for dental hard-tissues treatment could be of potential significance in adhesive/restorative dentistry owing to its ability of controlled, selective and localised combined tissue alteration/ablation effects.

    Matched MeSH terms: Dentin-Bonding Agents*
  4. Fu C, Deng S, Koneski I, Awad MM, Akram Z, Matinlinna J, et al.
    J Mech Behav Biomed Mater, 2020 12;112:104082.
    PMID: 32979607 DOI: 10.1016/j.jmbbm.2020.104082
    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of blue light photoactivated riboflavin modified universal adhesives on dentin collagen biodegradation resistance, dentin apparent elastic modulus, and resin-dentin bond strength with interfacial morphology.

    METHODS: Dentin slabs were treated with 0.1% riboflavin-5-phosphate modified (powder added slowly while shaking and then sonicated to enhance the dispersion process) Universal Adhesive Scotch Bond and Zipbond™ along with control (non-modified) and experimental adhesives, photoactivated with blue light for 20s. Hydroxyproline (HYP) release was assessed after 1-week storage. Elastic-modulus testing was evaluated using universal testing machine at 24 h. Resin-dentin interfacial morphology was assessed with scanning electron-microscope, after 6-month storage. 0.1% rhodamine dye was added into each adhesive and analyzed using CLSM. Detection of free amino groups was carried out using ninhydrin and considered directly proportional to optical absorbance. Collagen molecular confirmation was determined using spectropolarimeter to evaluate and assess CD spectra. For molecular docking studies with riboflavin (PDB ID file), the binding pocket was selected with larger SiteScore and DScore using Schrodinger PB software. After curing, Raman shifts in Amide regions were obtained at 8 μm levels. Data were analyzed using Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, p ≤ 0.05) and Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison post hoc tests.

    RESULTS: At baseline, bond strength reduced significantly (p ≤ 0.05) in control specimens. However, at 6 months' storage, UVA Zipbond™ had significantly higher μTBS. Resin was able to diffuse through the porous demineralized dentin creating adequate hybrid layers in both 0.1%RF modified adhesives in CLSM images. In riboflavin groups, hybrid layer and resin tags were more pronounced. The circular dichroism spectrum showed negative peaks for riboflavin adhesive specimens. Best fitted poses adopted by riboflavin compound are docked with MMP-2 and -9 proteases. Amide bands and CH2 peaks followed the trend of being lowest for control UA Scotch bond adhesive specimens and increasing in Amides, proline, and CH2 intensities in 0.1%RF modified adhesive specimens. All 0.1%RF application groups showed statistically significant (p Dentin Eappr of riboflavin application was significantly (p dentin as well as the long-term resin-dentin interfacial integrity and bond strength of universal adhesive to dentin.

    Matched MeSH terms: Dentin-Bonding Agents*
  5. Daood U, Omar H, Qasim S, Nogueira LP, Pichika MR, Mak KK, et al.
    J Mech Behav Biomed Mater, 2020 10;110:103927.
    PMID: 32957222 DOI: 10.1016/j.jmbbm.2020.103927
    OBJECTIVE: Here we describe a novel formulation, based on quaternary ammonium (QA) and riboflavin (RF), which combines antimicrobial activities and protease inhibitory properties with collagen crosslinking without interference to bonding capabilities, was investigated.

    METHODS: Experimental adhesives modified with different fractions of dioctadecyldimethyl ammonium bromide quaternary ammonium and riboflavin (QARF) were formulated. Dentine specimens were bonded to resincomposites with control or the experimental adhesives to be evaluated for bond strength, interfacial morphology, micro-Raman analysis, nano-CT and nano-leakage expression. In addition, the antibacterial and biocompatibilities of the experimental adhesives were investigated. The endogenous proteases activities and their molecular binding-sites were studied.

    RESULTS: Modifying the experimental adhesives with QARF did not adversely affect micro-tensile bond strength or the degree of conversion along with the demonstration of anti-proteases and antibacterial abilities with acceptable biocompatibilities. In general, all experimental adhesives demonstrated favourable bond strength with increased and improved values in 1% QARF adhesive at 24 h (39.2 ± 3.0 MPa) and following thermocycling (34.8 ± 4.3 MPa).

    SIGNIFICANCE: It is possible to conclude that the use of QARF with defined concentration can maintain bond strength values when an appropriate protocol is used and have contributed in ensuring a significant decrease in microbial growth of biofilms. Incorporation of 1% QARF in the experimental adhesive lead to simultaneous antimicrobial and anti-proteolytic effects with low cytotoxic effects, acceptable bond strength and interfacial morphology.

    Matched MeSH terms: Dentin-Bonding Agents
  6. Daood U, Sauro S, Pichika MR, Omar H, Liang Lin S, Fawzy AS
    Dent Mater, 2020 01;36(1):145-156.
    PMID: 31818524 DOI: 10.1016/j.dental.2019.11.003
    OBJECTIVE: To modify a universal dentine adhesive with different concentrations of riboflavin and D-Alpha 1000 Succinate polyethylene (VE-TPGS) as a chemical enhancer and to assess the micro-tensile bond strength (24h/12 months), determine resin penetration, measurement of intermolecular interactions and cytotoxicity.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: An experimental adhesive system based on bis-GMA, HEMA and hydrophobic monomer was doped with RF0.125 (RF - Riboflavin) or RF/VE-TPGS (0.25/0.50) and submitted to μTBS evaluation. Resin dentine slabs were prepared and examined using SEM and TEM. Adhesion force was analysed on ends of AFM cantilevers deflection. Quenched peptide assays were performed using fluorescence scanner and wavelengths set to 320nm and 405nm. Cytotoxicity was assessed using human peripheral blood mononuclear cell line. Molecular docking studies were carried out using Schrödinger small-molecule drug discovery suite 2018-2. Data from viable cell results was analyzed using one-way ANOVA. Bond strength values were analysed by two-way ANOVA. Nonparametric results were analyzed using a Kruskal-Wallis test at a 0.05 significance level.

    RESULTS: RF/VE-TPGS0.25 groups showed highest bond strength results after 24-h storage in artificial saliva (p<0.05). RF/VE-TPGS0.50 groups showed increased bond strength after 12-months of ageing. RF/VE-TPGS modified adhesives showed appreciable presence of a hybrid layer. Packing fraction indicated solid angle profiles describing well sized density and topology relations for the RF/VE-TPGS adhesives, in particular with the RF/VE-TPGS0.50 specimens. Qualitative analysis of the phenotype of macrophages was prominently CD163+ in the RF/VE-TPGS0.50. Both the compounds showed favourable negative binding energies as expressed in terms of 'XP GScore'.

    CONCLUSION: New formulations based on the incorporation of RF/VE-TPGS in universal adhesives may be of significant potential in facilitating penetration, distribution and uptake of riboflavin within the dentine surface.

    Matched MeSH terms: Dentin-Bonding Agents*
  7. Masudi, S.M., Padtong, E.A.
    MyJurnal
    The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the effect of times elapsed on the application of a single-step adhesive system and activation of light cured subsequently placed composite to the bond strength between composites and adhesives. This was an experimental study using fifteen teeth extracted human premolars, which were caries and pathology free. Sample of teeth were embedded up to cemento-enamel junction on box of acrylic resin. All teeth were cut to obtain flat occlusal dentin surfaces. The specimens were randomly selected and divided into three groups with five teeth each. All the teeth were assigned to single-step bonding system AQ Bond (Sun Medical Co. Ltd., Shiga, Japan) according to manufacturer’s direction. Group 1 was left for 45 seconds, group 2 for 2 minutes, while group 3 was 5 minutes before putting subsequently restorative material. Composite resin was applied in 3 mm diameter and 6 mm height of cylinder mold and cured according to manufacturer’s direction on the dentin surface. Shear bond strength were measured using a testing system (Instron 8874, Instron Corp., Canton, MA, USA) at a crosshead speed of 2 mm/min with cell load capacity of 25 KN. The bond-strengths between single step adhesive system (AQ Bond) and light cured composites were tested. Mann-Whitney test showed no significant differences in bond-strength between Group 1 and Group 2. However, there were significantly differences (p
    Matched MeSH terms: Dentin-Bonding Agents
  8. Al-Maqtari AA, Lui JL
    J Prosthodont, 2010 Jul;19(5):347-56.
    PMID: 20456026 DOI: 10.1111/j.1532-849X.2010.00593.x
    The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine if packable resin composite with/without flowable resin composite has the ability to prevent coronal leakage in restored endodontic access openings following aging.
    Matched MeSH terms: Dentin-Bonding Agents/chemistry
  9. Daood U, Tsoi JKH, Neelakantan P, Matinlinna JP, Omar HAK, Al-Nabulsi M, et al.
    Dent Mater, 2018 08;34(8):1175-1187.
    PMID: 29779627 DOI: 10.1016/j.dental.2018.05.005
    OBJECTIVE: Collagen fibrils aid in anchoring resin composite restorations to the dentine substrate. The aim of the study was to investigate effect of non-enzymatic glycation on bond strength and durability of demineralized dentine specimens in a modified two-step etch-and-rinse dentine adhesive.

    METHODS: Dentine surfaces were etched with 37% phosphoric acid, bonded with respective in vitro ethanol and acetone adhesives modified with (m/m, 0, 1%, 2% and 3% ribose), restored with restorative composite-resin, and sectioned into resin-dentine slabs and beams to be stored for 24h or 12 months in artificial saliva. Bond-strength testing was performed with bond failure analysis. Pentosidine assay was performed on demineralized ribose modified dentine specimens with HPLC sensitive fluorescent detection. The structural variations of ribose-modified dentine were analysed using TEM and human dental pulpal cells were used for cell viability. Three-point bending test of ribose-modified dentine beams were performed and depth of penetration of adhesives evaluated with micro-Raman spectroscopy. The MMP-2 and cathepsin K activities in ribose-treated dentine powder were also quantified using ELISA. Bond strength data was expressed using two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test. Paired T tests were used to analyse the specimens for pentosidine crosslinks. The modulus of elasticity and dentinal MMP-2 and cathepsin K concentrations was separately analyzed using one-way ANOVA.

    RESULTS: The incorporation of RB in the experimental two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive at 1% improved the adhesive bond strength without adversely affecting the degree of polymerisation. The newly developed adhesive increases the resistance of dentine collagen to degradation by inhibiting endogenous matrix metalloproteinases and cysteine cathepsins. The application of RB to acid-etched dentine helps maintain the mechanical properties.

    SIGNIFICANCE: The incorporation of 1%RB can be considered as a potential candidate stabilizing resin dentine bond.

    Matched MeSH terms: Dentin-Bonding Agents/chemistry*
  10. Khim TP, Sanggar V, Shan TW, Peng KC, Western JS, Dicksit DD
    J Conserv Dent, 2018 10 9;21(5):562-568.
    PMID: 30294122 DOI: 10.4103/JCD.JCD_115_18
    Introduction: Among the various causes of tooth discoloration after root canal treatment, percolation of sealer remnants into the dentinal tubules of the pulp chamber is the most common cause.

    Objectives: The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of dentin bonding agent (DBA) in preventing coronal discoloration caused by four different root canal sealers- MTA Fillapex, Sealapex, Zical and Z. O. B seal at different time intervals by measuring chromatic alterations using digital images analysis method.

    Methodology: Ninety mandibular premolars were collected and sectioned at 1 mm below the cementoenamel junction. Standard access cavity preparations of dimensions (depth-3 mm, width-0.8 mm, and length-3 mm) were prepared with a No. 245 bur through the cervical access. Following the standard irrigation protocol, specimens were then randomly divided into nine groups (four groups without DBA [1-4] +4 groups with DBA [5-8] +1 negative control [9]). In Groups 1-4, four different root canal sealers (MTA Fillapex, Sealapex, Zical, and Z.O.B seal) were applied to the walls of the pulp chamber. For Groups 5-8, the samples were etched with 37% phosphoric acid and DBA application was done before the respective root canal sealer application. The cervical access in all specimens was sealed using glass ionomer cement. Digital photographs were taken under standard lighting and environmental conditions at different time intervals: preprocedural, postprocedural, and after 1, 2, 3, and 4 months. These images were analyzed using Adobe Photoshop CS6 from which laboratory values and subsequently Delta E values were obtained.

    Results: Statistical analysis performed using repeated measures ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's tests show that the groups with DBA application had significantly lower mean Delta E values (P < 0.05) compared to the groups without DBA application.

    Conclusion: DBAs applied to the dentinal walls of the pulp chamber before obturation can effectively reduce the sealer-induced coronal discoloration.

    Matched MeSH terms: Dentin-Bonding Agents
  11. Al-Nabulsi M, Daud A, Yiu C, Omar H, Sauro S, Fawzy A, et al.
    Materials (Basel), 2019 Aug 07;12(16).
    PMID: 31394743 DOI: 10.3390/ma12162504
    Objective: To evaluate the effect of a new application method of bulk-fill flowable composite resin material on bond-strength, nanoleakage, and mechanical properties of dentine bonding agents.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sound extracted human molars were randomly divided into: manufacturer's instructions (MI), manual blend 2 mm (MB2), and manual blend 4 mm (MB4). Occlusal enamel was removed and flattened, dentin surfaces were bonded by Prime & Bond universal (Dentsply and Optibond FL, Kerr). For the MI group, adhesives were applied following the manufacturer's instructions then light-cured. For MB groups, SDR flow+ bulk-fill flowable composite resin was applied in 2- or 4-mm increment then manually rubbed by a micro brush for 15 s with uncured dentine bonding agents and the mixture was light-cured. Composite buildup was fabricated incrementally using Ceram.X One, Dentsply nanohybrid composite resin restorative material. After 24-h water storage, the teeth were sectioned to obtain beams of about 0.8 mm2 for 24-h and thermocycled micro-tensile bond strength at 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed. Degree of conversion was evaluated with micro-Raman spectroscopy. Contraction gaps at 24 h after polymerization were evaluated and atomic force microscopy (AFM) nano-indentation processes were undertaken for measuring the hardness across the interface. Depth of resin penetration was studied using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Bond strength data was expressed using two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test. Nanoindentation hardness was separately analyzed using one-way ANOVA.

    RESULTS: Factors "storage F = 6.3" and "application F = 30.11" significantly affected the bond strength to dentine. For Optibond FL, no significant difference in nanoleakage was found in MI/MB4 groups between baseline and aged specimens; significant difference in nanoleakage score was observed in MB2 groups. Confocal microscopy analysis showed MB2 Optibond FL and Prime & Bond universal specimens diffusing within the dentine. Contraction gap was significantly reduced in MB2 specimens in both adhesive systems. Degree of conversion (DC) of the MB2 specimens were numerically more compared to MS1 in both adhesive systems.

    CONCLUSION: Present study suggests that the new co-blend technique might have a positive effect on bond strengths of etch-and-rinse adhesives to dentine.

    Matched MeSH terms: Dentin-Bonding Agents
  12. Mustafa AA, Matinlinna JP, Saidin S, Kadir MR
    J Prosthet Dent, 2014 Dec;112(6):1498-506.
    PMID: 24993375 DOI: 10.1016/j.prosdent.2014.05.011
    STATEMENT OF PROBLEM: The inconsistency of dentin bonding affects retention and microleakage.

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this laboratory and finite element analysis study was to investigate the effects on the formation of a hybrid layer of an experimental silane coupling agent containing primer solutions composed of different percentages of hydroxyethyl methacrylate.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 125 sound human premolars were restored in vitro. Simple class I cavities were formed on each tooth, followed by the application of different compositions of experimental silane primers (0%, 5%, 25%, and 50% of hydroxyethyl methacrylate), bonding agents, and dental composite resins. Bond strength tests and scanning electron microscopy analyses were performed. The laboratory experimental results were validated with finite element analysis to determine the pattern of stress distribution. Simulations were conducted by placing the restorative composite resin in a premolar tooth by imitating simple class I cavities. The laboratory and finite element analysis data were significantly different from each other, as determined by 1-way ANOVA. A post hoc analysis was conducted on the bond strength data to further clarify the effects of silane primers.

    RESULTS: The strongest bond of hybrid layer (16.96 MPa) was found in the primer with 25% hydroxyethyl methacrylate, suggesting a barely visible hybrid layer barrier. The control specimens without the application of the primer and the primer specimens with no hydroxyethyl methacrylate exhibited the lowest strength values (8.30 MPa and 11.78 MPa) with intermittent and low visibility of the hybrid layer. These results were supported by finite element analysis that suggested an evenly distributed stress on the model with 25% hydroxyethyl methacrylate.

    CONCLUSIONS: Different compositions of experimental silane primers affected the formation of the hybrid layer and its resulting bond strength.

    Matched MeSH terms: Dentin-Bonding Agents/chemistry*
  13. Razak AA, Harrison A
    J Prosthet Dent, 1997 Apr;77(4):353-8.
    PMID: 9104710
    Dimensional accuracy of a composite inlay restoration is important to ensure an accurate fit and to minimize cementation stresses.
    Matched MeSH terms: Dentin-Bonding Agents/chemistry
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