Displaying all 11 publications

Abstract:
Sort:
  1. Das S, Rajalingham S
    Pain, 2012 Jan;153(1):250-251.
    PMID: 22119339 DOI: 10.1016/j.pain.2011.10.039
    Matched MeSH terms: Pain Measurement/drug effects*
  2. Sulaiman MR, Mohd Padzil A, Shaari K, Khalid S, Shaik Mossadeq WM, Mohamad AS, et al.
    J. Biomed. Biotechnol., 2010;2010:937642.
    PMID: 21274262 DOI: 10.1155/2010/937642
    Melicope ptelefolia is a medicinal herb commonly used in Malaysia to treat fever, pain, wounds, and itches. The present study was conducted to evaluate the antinociceptive activity of the Melicope ptelefolia ethanolic extract (MPEE) using animal models of nociception. The antinociceptive activity of the extract was assessed using acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing, hot-plate, and formalin-induced paw licking tests. Oral administration of MPEE produced significant dose-dependent antinociceptive effects when tested in mice and rats using acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction test and on the second phase of the formalin-induced paw licking test, respectively. It was also demonstrated that MPEE had no effect on the response latency time to the heat stimulus in the thermal model of the hot-plate test. In addition, the antinociception produced by MPEE was not blocked by naloxone. Furthermore, oral administration of MPEE did not produce any effect in motor performance of the rota-rod test and in acute toxicity study no abnormal behaviors as well as mortality were observed up to a dose level of the extract of 5 g/kg. These results indicated that MPEE at all doses investigated which did not produce any sedative and toxic effects exerted pronounce antinociceptive activity that acts peripherally in experimental animals.
    Matched MeSH terms: Pain Measurement/drug effects*
  3. Zakaria ZA, Mat Jais AM, Goh YM, Sulaiman MR, Somchit MN
    Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol, 2007 Mar;34(3):198-204.
    PMID: 17250639
    1. The present study was performed in order to determine the amino acid and fatty acid composition of an aqueous extract of the freshwater fish Channa striatus, obtained by soaking (1:2, w/v) fresh fillets overnight in a chloroform:methanol (2:1, v/v) solvent, to elucidate the mechanism responsible for its antinociceptive activity and to clarify the relationship between the presence of the amino and fatty acids and the expected activity. 2. The aqueous extract was found to contain all amino acids with the major amino acids glycine, alanine, lysine, aspartic acid and proline making up 35.77 +/- 0.58, 10.19 +/- 1.27, 9.44 +/- 0.56, 8.53 +/- 1.15 and 6.86 +/- 0.78% of the total protein, respectively. 3. In addition, the aqueous extract was found to have a high palmitic acid (C16:0) content, which contributed approximately 35.93 +/- 0.63% to total fatty acids. The other major fatty acids in the aqueous extract were oleic acid (C18:1), stearic acid (C18:0), linoleic acid (C18:2) and arachidonic acid (C20:4), contributing 22.96 +/- 0.40, 15.31 +/- 0.33, 11.45 +/- 0.31 and 7.44 +/- 0.83% of total fatty acids, respectively. 4. Furthermore, the aqueous extract was demonstrated to possess concentration-dependent antinociceptive activity, as expected, when assessed using the abdominal constriction test in mice. 5. It is concluded that the aqueous extract of C. striatus contains all the important amino acids, but only some of the important fatty acids, which are suggested to play a key role in the observed antinociceptive activity of the extract, as well as in the traditionally claimed wound healing properties of the extract.
    Matched MeSH terms: Pain Measurement/drug effects
  4. Goh JZ, Tang SN, Chiong HS, Yong YK, Zuraini A, Hakim MN
    Int J Nanomedicine, 2015;10:297-303.
    PMID: 25678786 DOI: 10.2147/IJN.S75545
    Diclofenac is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that exhibits anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive, and antipyretic activities. Liposomes have been shown to improve the therapeutic efficacy of encapsulated drugs. The present study was conducted to compare the antinociceptive properties between liposome-encapsulated and free-form diclofenac in vivo via different nociceptive assay models. Liposome-encapsulated diclofenac was prepared using the commercialized proliposome method. Antinociceptive effects of liposome-encapsulated and free-form diclofenac were evaluated using formalin test, acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing test, Randall-Selitto paw pressure test, and plantar test. The results of the writhing test showed a significant reduction of abdominal constriction in all treatment groups in a dose-dependent manner. The 20 mg/kg liposome-encapsulated diclofenac demonstrated the highest antinociceptive effect at 78.97% compared with 55.89% in the free-form group at equivalent dosage. Both liposome-encapsulated and free-form diclofenac produced significant results in the late phase of formalin assay at a dose of 20 mg/kg, with antinociception percentages of 78.84% and 60.71%, respectively. Significant results of antinociception were also observed in both hyperalgesia assays. For Randall-Sellito assay, the highest antinociception effect of 71.38% was achieved with 20 mg/kg liposome-encapsulated diclofenac, while the lowest antinociceptive effect of 17.32% was recorded with 0 mg/kg liposome formulation, whereas in the plantar test, the highest antinociceptive effect was achieved at 56.7% with 20 mg/kg liposome-encapsulated diclofenac, and the lowest effect was shown with 0 mg/kg liposome formulation of 8.89%. The present study suggests that liposome-encapsulated diclofenac exhibits higher antinociceptive efficacy in a dose-dependent manner in comparison with free-form diclofenac.
    Matched MeSH terms: Pain Measurement/drug effects
  5. Buhari S, Hashim K, Yong Meng G, Mustapha NM, Gan SH
    ScientificWorldJournal, 2012;2012:564939.
    PMID: 22778699 DOI: 10.1100/2012/564939
    Subcutaneous (SC) administration of tramadol was compared with intravenous (IV) administration to evaluate analgesia following canine ovariohysterectomy (OHE). Healthy female dogs (n = 12) between 1 and 3 years of age (1.95 ± 0.65 years), weighing between 10.5 and 17.1 kg (13.12 ± 1.95 kg), were used. Pain was assessed at baseline before surgery and then hourly for 8 hr after surgery. Tramadol was administered both SC and IV at a dose of 3 mg/kg and provided significant postoperative analgesia, as indicated by analgesiometry, β-endorphin levels, and interleukin 6 (IL-6) levels. The respiratory rates and rectal temperatures remained normal and were not significantly different between or within the groups. A significant increase in heart rate was observed at 4 hr for dogs in both groups relative to the baseline, but there was no significant difference in heart rates between the groups at any time point. A significant decrease in mechanical pain threshold was observed within each group after surgery, but both groups responded similarly, suggesting that SC administration of tramadol is as effective as IV administration. Increased serum levels of both IL-6 and β-endorphin 3 hr postoperatively further indicate that both routes of administration achieve similar pain control. Thus, the relative analgesic efficacy of SC tramadol is comparable to that of IV administration and can be used to achieve similar effects for postsurgical pain management in dogs undergoing OHE.
    Matched MeSH terms: Pain Measurement/drug effects
  6. Cheok CY, Mohamad JA, Ahmad TS
    J Orthop Trauma, 2011 Jan;25(1):5-10.
    PMID: 21164304 DOI: 10.1097/BOT.0b013e3181d3d338
    The aim was to compare the effectiveness of intra-articular lidocaine (IAL) versus intravenous Demerol and Diazepam (IVS) in reduction of acute anterior shoulder dislocation.
    Matched MeSH terms: Pain Measurement/drug effects*
  7. Bhalang K, Thunyakitpisal P, Rungsirisatean N
    J Altern Complement Med, 2013 May;19(5):429-34.
    PMID: 23240939 DOI: 10.1089/acm.2012.0164
    The objective of this study was to elucidate the safety and effectiveness of acemannan, a polysaccharide extracted from Aloe vera, in the treatment of oral aphthous ulceration.
    Matched MeSH terms: Pain Measurement/drug effects
  8. Sulaiman MR, Somchit MN, Israf DA, Ahmad Z, Moin S
    Fitoterapia, 2004 Dec;75(7-8):667-72.
    PMID: 15567242
    The antinociceptive effect of the ethanolic extract of Melastoma malabathricum (MME) was investigated using acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing test and hot-plate test in mice. It was demonstrated that the extract (30-300 mg/kg, i.p.) strongly and dose-dependently inhibited the acetic acid-induced writhing with an ED(50) of 100 (78-160) mg/kg i.p. It also significantly increased the response latency period to thermal stimuli. Furthermore, the nonselective opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone blocked the antinociceptive effect of the extract in both tests, suggesting that M. malabathricum may act both at peripheral and central levels.
    Matched MeSH terms: Pain Measurement/drug effects
  9. Zakaria ZA, Sulaiman MR, Mat Jais AM, Somchit MN
    Can. J. Physiol. Pharmacol., 2005 Jul;83(7):635-42.
    PMID: 16091789
    The effects of an aqueous supernatant of haruan (ASH) (Channa striatus) fillet extract on various antinociception receptor system activities were examined using a mouse abdominal-constriction model. Mice that were pretreated with distilled water, s.c., followed 10 min later by administration of 25%, 50%, and 100% concentration ASH, s.c., produced a significant concentration-dependent antinociceptive activity (p < 0.001). Pretreatment with naloxone (0.3, 1.0, and 3.0 mg/kg body mass), 10 min before ASH administration, failed to block the extract antinociception. Pretreatment of the 100% concentration ASH with mecamylamine (5 mg/kg), pindolol (10 mg/kg), and haloperidol (1 mg/kg) also did not cause any significant change in its antinociception. However, pretreatment with atropine (5 mg/kg), bicuculline (10 mg/kg), phenoxybenzamine (10 mg/kg), and methysergide (5 mg/kg) were found to reverse ASH antinociception. Based on the above findings, the ASH is suggested to contain different types of bioactive compounds that act synergistically on muscarinic, GABAA, alpha-adrenergic, and serotonergic receptor systems to produce the observed antinociception.
    Matched MeSH terms: Pain Measurement/drug effects
  10. Zakaria ZA, Sulaiman MR, Somchit MN, Jais AM, Ali DI
    J Pharm Pharm Sci, 2005;8(2):199-206.
    PMID: 16124931
    To determine the involvement of nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO/cGMP) pathway in aqueous supernatant of haruan (Channa striatus) fillet (ASH) antinociception using the acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction test.
    Matched MeSH terms: Pain Measurement/drug effects*
  11. Zakaria ZA, Kumar GH, Mat Jais AM, Sulaiman MR, Somchit MN
    Methods Find Exp Clin Pharmacol, 2008 Jun;30(5):355-62.
    PMID: 18806894 DOI: 10.1358/mf.2008.30.5.1186084
    The present study was carried out to elucidate the antinociceptive, antiinflammatory and antipyretic properties of the aqueous and lipid-based extracts of Channa striatus fillet in rats. The antinociceptive activity was assessed using the formalin test, and the antiinflammatory and antipyretic activities were assessed using the carrageenan-induced paw edema and brewer's yeast-induced pyrexia tests, respectively. Both types of extracts were prepared in concentrations of 10%, 50% and 100% by serial dilution in distilled water or dimethyl sulfoxide, respectively, and were administered subcutaneously 30 min prior to each test. Except for the 10% aqueous extract which exhibits activity only in the early phase, the extracts were found to exhibit significant (P < 0.05) activity in the early and late phases of the formalin test. Furthermore, the aqueous and lipid-based extracts were also found to show significant (P < 0.05) antiinflammatory activity, with the former showing a greater effect at the lowest concentration used. The lipidbased, but not the aqueous, extract was found to have significant (P < 0.05) activity in the pyrexia test. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that C. striatus extracts possess antinociceptive, antiinflammatory and antipyretic activities.
    Matched MeSH terms: Pain Measurement/drug effects
Filters
Contact Us

Please provide feedback to Administrator (tengcl@gmail.com)

External Links