Displaying publications 1 - 20 of 682 in total

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  1. Masood M, Masood Y, Saub R, Newton JT
    J Public Health Dent, 2014;74(1):13-20.
    PMID: 22994869 DOI: 10.1111/j.1752-7325.2012.00374.x
    Demand and use for oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) instruments have increased in recent years in both research and clinical settings. These instruments can be used to measure patient's health status or detect changes in a patient's health status in response to an intervention or changes in disease trajectory. Ensuring universal acceptance of these measures requires easy interpretation of its scores for clinicians, researchers, and patients. The most important way of describing and interpreting this significance of changes in OHRQoL is through the establishment of minimal important difference (MID). The minimally important difference represents the smallest improvement considered worthwhile by a patient. A comprehensive search of published literature identified only 12 published articles on establishment of MID for OHRQoL measures. This scarcity of published studies on MID encourages the need of appropriate interpretation and describing patient satisfaction in reference to that treatment using MID. Anchor- and distribution-based methods are the two general approaches that have been proposed and recommended to interpret differences or changes in OHRQoL. Both of these methods of determining the MID have specific shortcomings; therefore, it is proposed to adopt triangulation approaches in which the methods are combined. The objective of this review is to summarize the need for, importance of, and recommendations for methods of establishing MID for OHRQoL measures.
    Matched MeSH terms: Quality of Life*
  2. Arunachalam S, Sharan J
    Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop, 2018 02;153(2):168-169.
    PMID: 29407490 DOI: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.11.013
    Matched MeSH terms: Quality of Life*
  3. Ezat WP, Noraziani K, Sabrizan O
    Asian Pac. J. Cancer Prev., 2012;13(3):1069-75.
    PMID: 22631640
    There are an almost infinite number of states of health, all with differing qualities that can be affected by many factors. Each aspect of health has many components which contribute to multidimensionality. Cancer and its' related issues surrounding the treatment plan contribute to the variety of changes of quality of life of cancer patients throughout their life. The objective of this article was to provide an overview of some of the issues that can affect their quality of life and initiatives towards successful care in Malaysia by reviewing relevant reports and articles. The current strategies can be further strengthened by prevention of cancer while improving quality of service to cancer patients.
    Matched MeSH terms: Quality of Life*
  4. Lim R, Liong ML, Leong WS, Lau YK, Khan NAK, Yuen KH
    Urology, 2018 Feb;112:38-45.
    PMID: 29107131 DOI: 10.1016/j.urology.2017.10.019
    OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) on individual components of quality of life (QoL) using both condition-specific and generic questionnaires, and to compare the results of the 2 instruments with a control group.

    METHODS: Women with or without SUI aged ≥21 years old were recruited. Subjects completed the International Consultation of Incontinence-Urinary Incontinence Short Form (ICIQ-UI-SF), International Consultation of Incontinence-Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Quality of Life (ICIQ-LUTSqol), and EQ-5D questionnaires.

    RESULTS: A total of 120 women with SUI and 145 controls participated. The ICIQ-LUTSqol total score (mean ± standard deviation) was significantly higher in the SUI group (38.96 ± 10.28) compared with the control group (20.78 ± 2.73) (P 

    Matched MeSH terms: Quality of Life*
  5. Raihana, Z., Farah Nabilah, A.M.
    MyJurnal
    Most studies done in the past on factors affecting academic performance did not touch on quality of life factor. Also, most studies only used correlation and regression analysis. Not many studies used classification analysis. Hence, this study aimed to classify students based on quality of life and academic performance. Students’ quality of life was measured by using WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire which consists of five quality of life domains namely physical health, psychological health, social relationship, environment and overall quality of life whereas the academic performances were represented by cumulative grade point average (CGPA). The selected sample for this study was 60 Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM) Perlis students from Bachelor of Science (Hons.) Management Mathematics program. This study applied support vector machine (SVM) method for classifying the students. The results for each quality of life domain showed that students with both low and high academic performance were classified into high academic performance class. The same result was obtained when all domains were combined. All models showed high accuracy which implied that the classification made by SVM were strongly correct. The findings of this study demonstrated that quality of life plays an important role in students’ academic performance.
    Matched MeSH terms: Quality of Life*
  6. Tsutsumi A, Izutsu T, Ito A, Thornicroft G, Patel V, Minas H
    Lancet Psychiatry, 2015 Aug;2(8):679-680.
    PMID: 26249285 DOI: 10.1016/S2215-0366(15)00278-3
    Matched MeSH terms: Quality of Life/psychology*
  7. Mohd Adibi SMA, Chen NR, Azmir NA, Solahan N, Ismail A, Anuar AZ, et al.
    Med. J. Malaysia, 2013 Aug;68(4):315-22.
    PMID: 24145259 MyJurnal
    Hearing impairment in adolescents is a major public health problem. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) deafness and hearing impairment are common health problems throughout the world. Hearing impairment generally impairs emotional, social, communication and educational function. The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between duration of hearing aid use and improvements in the quality of life. The cross sectional study was conducted at Jalan Peel Primary Special School and Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center (UKMMC) from July 2010 until June 2011. A total of 21 students with hearing impairment involved in this study with mean age of 12.57 (10 to 19 years old). The subjects were divided into 2 groups: first-time hearing aid users and long standing hearing aid users. The hearing assessment was conducted in the first group and hearing aids were fitted. After 1 month hearing aid fitting, the questionnaires were distributed to both groups. Statistical analysis had showed no relation (p>0.05) between duration of hearing aid use and the improvement in the quality of life. However, regardless of the duration of hearing aid usage, there was improvement in the quality of life as shown by the scores of the questionnaires. In conclusion there was no significant relation between duration of hearing aid use and the improvement in the quality of life. Hearing aids were beneficial for hearing loss students regardless of the duration of the hearing aid usage.
    Matched MeSH terms: Quality of Life*
  8. Ramli M, Zafri AB, Junid MR, Hatta S
    Med. J. Malaysia, 2012 Dec;67(6):560-4.
    PMID: 23770945 MyJurnal
    The escalating problem of opiate dependence in Malaysia and the limitations of regimental approach of forced admission to rehabilitation centres had triggered the government to expand the methadone maintenance therapy to become a national programme. This study aimed to evaluate the short-term outcomes of the Methadone Maintenance Therapy programme in one of the busiest hospital in east coast Malaysia. We also explored the prevalence on non-compliance and factors associated to it. A total of 172 patient case notes at Methadone Clinic Hospital Tengku Ampuan Afzan (HTAA) were retrieved for relevant data. A short survey was also conducted to determine the subjects' current employment and marital status. The programme's retention rate was 62% and factors associated with poor compliance were unemployment, low quality of life scores and low dose of methadone. A special attention on the patients with these three risk factors may improve their compliance to MMT. The short-term evaluation of MMT at HTAA revealed favourable findings.
    Matched MeSH terms: Quality of Life*
  9. Ainuddin HA, Loh SY, Low WY, Sapihis M, Roslani AC
    Asian Pac. J. Cancer Prev., 2012;13(12):6289-94.
    PMID: 23464447
    BACKGROUND: Research evidence suggests a debilitating impact of the diagnosis of cancer on the quality of life of the afflicted individuals, their spouses and their families. However, relatively few studies have been carried out on the impact on the QOL of adolescents living with parents diagnosed with cancer. This paper presents a sub- analysis on the impact of parental cancer (colorectal, breast and lung) on adolescents.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study on adolescents aged 13-18 years old. Upon ethical clearance obtained from UMMC Medical Ethics Committee, patients with colorectal, breast or lung cancer and their adolescent children were recruited from the Clinical Oncology Unit of University of Malaya Medical Centre. Respondents who gave consent completed a demographic questionnaire and the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory, via the post, email, home visit or meetings at the clinics.

    RESULTS: 95 adolescents from 50 families responded, giving a response rate of 88 percent. The adolescent's mean age was 16 years (ranging between 13-18 years). Adolescents with parental cancer had the lowest mean score in emotional functioning (p<0.05). Male adolescents had significantly higher quality of life overall and in physical functioning compared to female adolescents. Adolescents with a father with cancer had better school functioning compared to adolescents whose mothers had cancer. Families with household income of RM 5000 and above have significantly better quality of life compared to families with lower household income.

    CONCLUSIONS: Adolescent sons and daughters of parents with a cancer diagnosis show lowered QOL, particularly with reference to emotional functioning and school performance. Addressing the needs of this young group has been slow and warrants special attention. Revisiting the risk and resilience factors of adolescents might also inform tailored programs to address the needs of this neglected adolescent population.
    Matched MeSH terms: Quality of Life/psychology*
  10. Hamzaid H, Talib RA, Azizi NH, Maamor N, Reilly JJ, Wafa SW
    Int J Pediatr Obes, 2011 Oct;6(5-6):450-4.
    PMID: 21767214 DOI: 10.3109/17477166.2011.590206
    Quality of life (QoL) is impaired in childhood obesity, but the literature on this is all from Western countries. Aim. To test for impairment of QoL in obese children in Malaysia, using parent-reported and child-reported QoL.
    Matched MeSH terms: Quality of Life*
  11. Hasanah CI, Naing L, Rahman ARA
    Med. J. Malaysia, 2003 Mar;58(1):79-88.
    PMID: 14556329 MyJurnal
    WHOQOL-100, a 100 items quality of life assessment by WHO is too lengthy to be applicable in researches where the quality of life is one of the many variables of interest. The abbreviated version with 26 items is more acceptable by subjects, especially those with illness. The generic and the abbreviated Malay version were given to subjects who were healthy and with illness. Results showed that the domain scores produced by WHOQOL-BREF correlate highly with that of WHOQOL-100. WHOQOL-BREF domain scores demonstrated good discriminant validity, construct validity, internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The study indicates that WHOQOL-BREF in its brevity offers a valid and reliable assessment of quality of life.
    Matched MeSH terms: Quality of Life*
  12. Chelvam P
    PMID: 8171292
    There is a need to define Quality of Life and to develop a practical method to measure objectively this aspect in gastrointestinal diseases. This has not been performed in any Asian population. It is proposed that this evaluation be part of future trials in Asia on the basis that Asian patients are culturally, socially and politically different from Westerners.
    Matched MeSH terms: Quality of Life*
  13. Isa SN, Ishak I, Ab Rahman A, Mohd Saat NZ, Che Din N, Lubis SH, et al.
    Asian J Psychiatr, 2016 Oct;23:71-77.
    PMID: 27969083 DOI: 10.1016/j.ajp.2016.07.007
    Families caring for children with disabilities face particular challenges and demands compared to those caring for children without disabilities. Evidence suggests that there is considerable variation in how caregivers of children with disabilities adapt to their caregiving demands and stressors. The different adaptations to the children with disabilities may cause different impacts on the health and well-being of caregivers. This paper provides a brief overview of the literature on the impact of caring for children with disabilities on the health and quality of life of caregivers and the factors related to the health outcomes and quality of life. A literature search was conducted by using various electronic databases, including PsychINFO, ScienceDirect, ProQuest, and MEDLINE using specific key terms. Thirty-one articles published in peer-review journals from the last six years (2009-2014) were reviewed. Most of the studies were quantitative studies. Factors discussed that impact on caregivers' health and quality of life include the caregivers' sociodemographic background and child's disability-related factors. Several mediators and moderators including coping strategies, social support, parental stress, self-esteem and self-efficacy are described in this paper. This review highlighted the importance of these factors to better understand the complex nature of stress processes and the caregivers' adaptations to their children's disabilities.
    Matched MeSH terms: Quality of Life*
  14. Abdullah, N.S., Radzali, N.F.M., Saub, R., R.D. Vaithilingam,
    Ann Dent, 2013;20(2):16-23.
    MyJurnal
    To assess the oral health related quality of life
    (OHQoL) of a selected population of Malaysian adults and to compare the OHQoL by periodontal status. Material & Methods: This cross-sectional study comprises a convenient sampling of fifty subjects from the Primary Care Unit, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Malaya. OHQoL was assessed using the Malaysian version of Oral Health Impact Profile-14 (OHIP-14). Basic periodontal examination (BPE) was performed on all subjects to determine their periodontal status. Descriptive statistics and bivariate analysis were performed.
    Results: Psychological discomfort, physical pain and psychological disability domains were the most affected dimensions in this population. Subjects with income levels >RM2,500 had higher impacts on their OHQoL as compared to those from other income levels (p0.05).
    Conclusion: Subjects with high income levels had high impacts on their OHQoL. Those with periodontitis experienced higher impacts on their OHQoL as compared to those who had a healthy periodontium or gingivitis and affected a wide range of domains of quality of life.
    Matched MeSH terms: Quality of Life*
  15. Priscilla D, Hamidin A, Azhar MZ, Noorjan K, Salmiah MS, Bahariah K
    Malays J Med Sci, 2011 Jul;18(3):49-56.
    PMID: 22135601 MyJurnal
    The paper examined the quality of life of haematological cancer patients according to their socio-demographic profiles and clinical diagnoses.
    Matched MeSH terms: Quality of Life
  16. Shekhawat KS, Chauhan A, Nordstroem M
    Indian J Dent Res, ;27(1):22-6.
    PMID: 27054856 DOI: 10.4103/0970-9290.179809
    BACKGROUND: Ladakh has less than optimal oral health care services and a poor transport and connectivity with other areas of the country during most part of the year. Therefore, immediate address to any dental pain is not possible. This study aims to determine the prevalence of dental pain among 12-15-year-old schoolchildren of Leh, Ladakh after the commutation impairing time of the year.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in May 2014 to determine the prevalence and impact of dental pain among adolescents residing in Leh, Ladakh. A total of 264 students in the age group of 12-15 years participated in the study. The data were obtained using a pretested questionnaire that elicited information on past experience (6 months) of dental pain and the resultant impact on their daily lives.

    STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED: Descriptive statistics was used for distribution of frequencies.

    RESULTS: The response rate was 75.7%. Seventy-seven percent of the students reported dental pain in the past 6 months. About 89% of the students reported, at least, one impact due to dental pain. Females reported more than their male counterpart. Difficulty in eating was found to be commonly reported impact followed by difficulty in sleeping.

    CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of dental pain and its impact was found to be high. There is a need for a paradigm shift in focus of oral health services from urban areas to remote and rural areas. Knowledge about the magnitude of dental pain can be used to evaluate and plan preventive and curative services in remote and rural areas.

    Matched MeSH terms: Quality of Life*
  17. Omar R, Rahman MH, Knight VF, Mustaphal M, Mohammed Z
    BMC Res Notes, 2014;7:667.
    PMID: 25245590 DOI: 10.1186/1756-0500-7-667
    Vision impairment associated with diabetic retinopathy, is well known and low vision rehabilitation is always recommended. In this report, the importance of objective measure of mental health and quality of life screening in diabetic retinopathy low-vision assessment is discussed.
    Matched MeSH terms: Quality of Life*
  18. Geok CK, Abdullah KL, Kee LH
    Int J Nurs Pract, 2013 Aug;19(4):381-9.
    PMID: 23915407 DOI: 10.1111/ijn.12083
    The purpose of this paper is to examine the quality of life (QOL) among mothers with a child with Down syndrome using The World Health Organization Quality of Life scale instrument. A convenience sample of 161 mothers was accessed through the various institutions which provide interventional or educational programmes to children with disabilities within two of the regions of the Borneo State of Malaysia (Sarawak). Nearly half of the group of mothers perceived their QOL as neither poor nor good (n = 73). An overall QOL score of 14.0 ± 1.84 was obtained. The highest and lowest domain scores were found for social relationship domain (Mean = 14.9 ± 2.1) and environmental support domain (Mean = 13.3 ± 2.1) respectively. Correlation analysis of selected background variables (i.e. locality, education, income and marital status) and overall QOL indicated rho (161) = 0.22-0.28 (P < 0.01). Inverse correlation between maternal age and overall QOL score was indicated, with rho (161) = -0.17 (P < 0.05). Linear regression analysis indicated that the combination of these few variables together accounted for 14.5% of the QOL variability in the sample. Findings point to implications for priorities of care provisions by policy-makers and care professionals in their practice.
    Matched MeSH terms: Quality of Life*
  19. Chong VH, Chand PB, Gautam HR, Jalihal A
    Med. J. Malaysia, 2013 Jun;68(3):234-8.
    PMID: 23749013
    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disorders (GORD) are common in Western countries and has been reported to be increasing in the East. This study assessed the prevalence of GORD among the Nepalese residing in the Brunei Darussalam.
    Matched MeSH terms: Quality of Life*
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