Affiliations 

  • 1 Department of Family Medicine, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan; College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan; Institute of Geriatrics, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan
  • 2 Department of Family Medicine, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan; College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan
  • 3 Orthopaedic Research Centre, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; Department of Orthopaedics, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; Departments of Orthopaedics, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; Department of Orthopaedics, Kaohsiung Municipal Ta-Tung Hospital, Kaohsiung City, Taiwan
  • 4 New Mexico Clinical Research & Osteoporosis Center, Albuquerque, NM, USA
  • 5 Hormone & Bone Metabolic Center & Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, D-55122, Mainz, Germany
  • 6 Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland Private Bag, 92019, Auckland, New Zealand
  • 7 Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, 10048, Taiwan
  • 8 Fujii Memorial Institute of Medical Sciences, University of Tokushima, Japan
  • 9 Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, University of Santo Tomas, Manila, Philippines
  • 10 Superintendent Office, National Taiwan University Hospital Chu-Tung Branch, Zhudong, Taiwan; Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Chu-Tung, Taiwan; Department of Geriatrics and Gerontology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Chu-Tung, Taiwan
  • 11 Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taiwan
  • 12 Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacy, Centre for Genomic Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong
  • 13 Division of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA
  • 14 Beacon International Specialist Centre, Petaling Jaya, Malaysia
  • 15 Division of Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua, Taiwan
  • 16 Department of Endocrinology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College. Beijing, 100730 China
  • 17 Department of Radiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College. Beijing, 100730, China
  • 18 Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, 16499, South Korea
  • 19 Department of Medicine, School of Clinical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, 3168, Australia
  • 20 Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Medanta, the Medicity, Gurgaon, Pin: 122001, India
  • 21 Department of Medicine, University Hospital of Geneva, Switzerland
  • 22 Oxford National Institute for Health Biomedical Research Centre, University of Oxford, Windmill Road, Oxford, United Kingdom
  • 23 Department of Public Health and Environmental Medicine, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan
  • 24 Department of Orthopaedics, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University & Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. Electronic address: rsyang@ntuh.gov.tw
J Clin Densitom, 2019 Mar 20.
PMID: 31010789 DOI: 10.1016/j.jocd.2019.03.004

Abstract

Osteoporosis is a major health issue. By 2050, a greater than 2-fold increase in patients number with hip fractures will occur in Asia representing 50% of all hip fractures worldwide. For the Asia-Pacific (AP) region, more efforts on controlling osteoporosis and the subsequent fractures are crucial. Bone mineral density (BMD) by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is commonly used to diagnose osteoporosis and monitor osteoporosis treatment. However, the inconvenience, cost, limited availability of DXA and the delay in detection of BMD changes after treatment initiation support an important role for bone turnover markers (BTMs), as short-term tools to monitor therapy. With regards to low adherence rates of medical treatment of osteoporosis, the experts reached consensus on the use of BTMs for both raising awareness and short-term monitoring of osteoporosis treatment in the AP region. The experts endorse the use of BTMs, especially serum C-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (CTX) and serum procollagen type 1 N propeptide (P1NP), as short-term monitoring tools to help clinicians assess the responses to osteoporosis therapies and appropriately adjust treatment regimens earlier than BMD. Either the absolute values or the degree of change from baseline in BTMs can be used to monitor the potential efficacy of osteoporosis therapies. The use of BTMs can be incorporated in osteoporosis care programs, such as fracture liaison service (FLS), to improve patient adherence and treatment outcomes. Encouraging sufficient reimbursement from health care systems may facilitate widespread use of BTMs in clinical practice in the AP region.

* Title and MeSH Headings from MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.