Displaying publications 1 - 20 of 61 in total

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  1. Gan HM, Tan MH, Austin CM
    PMID: 24938115 DOI: 10.3109/19401736.2014.926490
    The mitochondrial genome sequence of the Australian crayfish, Euastacus yarraensis, is documented and compared with other Australian crayfish genera. Euastacus yarraensis has a mitogenome of 15,548 base pairs consisting of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal subunit genes, 22 transfer RNAs, and a non-coding AT-rich region. The base composition of E. yarraensis mitogenome is 32.39% for T, 22.45% for C, 34.43% for A, and 10.73% for G, with an AT bias of 66.82%. The mitogenome gene order conforms to what is considered the primitive arrangement for parastacid crayfish.
  2. Gan HM, Tan MH, Austin CM
    PMID: 24617485 DOI: 10.3109/19401736.2014.895997
    The commercial freshwater crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus complete mitochondrial genome was recovered from partial genome sequencing using the MiSeq Personal Sequencer. The mitogenome has 15,869 base pairs consisting of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal subunit genes, 22 transfer RNAs, and a non-coding AT-rich region. The base composition of C. quadricarinatus is 32.16% for T, 23.39% for C, 33.26% for A, and 11.19% for G, with an AT bias of 65.42%.
  3. Gan HM, Tan MH, Austin CM
    PMID: 24617484 DOI: 10.3109/19401736.2014.895996
    The complete mitochondrial genome of the conservationally significant Macquarie perch (Macquaria australasica) was obtained from low-coverage shotgun sequencing using the MiSeq sequencer. The M. australasica mitogenome has 16,496 base pairs (55% A + T content) made up of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal subunit genes, 22 transfer RNAs, and a 819 bp non-coding AT-rich region. This is the first mitogenome sequence for the genus Macquaria, and the third to be reported for the family Percichthyidae.
  4. Gan HM, Schultz MB, Austin CM
    BMC Evol. Biol., 2014;14:19.
    PMID: 24484414 DOI: 10.1186/1471-2148-14-19
    Although it is possible to recover the complete mitogenome directly from shotgun sequencing data, currently reported methods and pipelines are still relatively time consuming and costly. Using a sample of the Australian freshwater crayfish Engaeus lengana, we demonstrate that it is possible to achieve three-day turnaround time (four hours hands-on time) from tissue sample to NCBI-ready submission file through the integration of MiSeq sequencing platform, Nextera sample preparation protocol, MITObim assembly algorithm and MITOS annotation pipeline.
  5. Gan HM, Lee YP, Austin CM
    Front Microbiol, 2017;8:1880.
    PMID: 29046667 DOI: 10.3389/fmicb.2017.01880
    We improved upon the previously reported draft genome of Hydrogenophaga intermedia strain PBC, a 4-aminobenzenesulfonate-degrading bacterium, by supplementing the assembly with Nanopore long reads which enabled the reconstruction of the genome as a single contig. From the complete genome, major genes responsible for the catabolism of 4-aminobenzenesulfonate in strain PBC are clustered in two distinct genomic regions. Although the catabolic genes for 4-sulfocatechol, the deaminated product of 4-aminobenzenesulfonate, are only found in H. intermedia, the sad operon responsible for the first deamination step of 4-aminobenzenesulfonate is conserved in various Hydrogenophaga strains. The absence of pabB gene in the complete genome of H. intermedia PBC is consistent with its p-aminobenzoic acid (pABA) auxotrophy but surprisingly comparative genomics analysis of 14 Hydrogenophaga genomes indicate that pABA auxotrophy is not an uncommon feature among members of this genus. Of even more interest, several Hydrogenophaga strains do not possess the genomic potential for hydrogen oxidation, calling for a revision to the taxonomic description of Hydrogenophaga as "hydrogen eating bacteria."
  6. Gan HM, Linton SM, Austin CM
    Mar Genomics, 2019 Jun;45:64-71.
    PMID: 30928201 DOI: 10.1016/j.margen.2019.02.002
    Despite recent advances in sequencing technology, a complete mitogenome assembly is still unavailable for the gecarcinid land crabs that include the iconic Christmas Island red crab (Gecarcoidea natalis) which is known for its high population density, annual mass breeding migration and ecological significance in maintaining rainforest structure. Using sequences generated from Nanopore and Illumina platforms, we assembled the complete mitogenome for G. natalis, the first for the genus and only second for the family Gecarcinidae. Nine Nanopore long reads representing 0.15% of the sequencing output from an overnight MinION Nanopore run were aligned to the mitogenome. Two of them were >10 kb and combined are sufficient to span the entire G. natalis mitogenome. The use of Illumina genome skimming data only resulted in a fragmented assembly that can be attributed to low to zero sequencing coverage in multiple high AT-regions including the mitochondrial protein-coding genes (NAD4 and NAD5), 16S ribosomal rRNA and non-coding control region. Supplementing the mitogenome assembly with previously acquired transcriptome dataset containing high abundance of mitochondrial transcripts improved mitogenome sequence coverage and assembly reliability. We then inferred the phylogeny of the Eubrachyura using Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian approaches, confirming the phylogenetic placement of G. natalis within the family Gecarcinidae based on whole mitogenome alignment. Given the substantial impact of AT-content on mitogenome assembly and the value of complete mitogenomes in phylogenetic and comparative studies, we recommend that future mitogenome sequencing projects consider generating a modest amount of Nanopore long reads to facilitate the closing of problematic and fragmented mitogenome assemblies.
  7. Tan MH, Gan HM, Schultz MB, Austin CM
    Mol Phylogenet Evol, 2015 Apr;85:180-8.
    PMID: 25721538 DOI: 10.1016/j.ympev.2015.02.009
    The increased rate at which complete mitogenomes are being sequenced and their increasing use for phylogenetic studies have resulted in a bioinformatic bottleneck in preparing and utilising such data for phylogenetic analysis. Hence, we present MitoPhAST, an automated tool that (1) identifies annotated protein-coding gene features and generates a standardised, concatenated and partitioned amino acid alignment directly from complete/partial GenBank/EMBL-format mitogenome flat files, (2) generates a maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree using optimised protein models and (3) reports various mitochondrial genes and sequence information in a table format. To demonstrate the capacity of MitoPhAST in handling a large dataset, we used 81 publicly available decapod mitogenomes, together with eight new complete mitogenomes of Australian freshwater crayfishes, including the first for the genus Gramastacus, to undertake an updated test of the monophyly of the major groups of the order Decapoda and their phylogenetic relationships. The recovered phylogenetic trees using both Bayesian and ML methods support the results of studies using fragments of mtDNA and nuclear markers and other smaller-scale studies using whole mitogenomes. In comparison to the fragment-based phylogenies, nodal support values are generally higher despite reduced taxon sampling suggesting there is value in utilising more fully mitogenomic data. Additionally, the simple table output from MitoPhAST provides an efficient summary and statistical overview of the mitogenomes under study at the gene level, allowing the identification of missing or duplicated genes and gene rearrangements. The finding of new mtDNA gene rearrangements in several genera of Australian freshwater crayfishes indicates that this group has undergone an unusually high rate of evolutionary change for this organelle compared to other major families of decapod crustaceans. As a result, freshwater crayfishes are likely to be a useful model for studies designed to understand the evolution of mtDNA rearrangements. We anticipate that our bioinformatics pipeline will substantially help mitogenome-based studies increase the speed, accuracy and efficiency of phylogenetic studies utilising mitogenome information. MitoPhAST is available for download at https://github.com/mht85/MitoPhAST.
  8. Tan MH, Gan HM, Lee YP, Austin CM
    Mitochondrial DNA A DNA Mapp Seq Anal, 2016 11;27(6):3981-3982.
    PMID: 25541307
    The mitochondrial genome sequence of the purple mottled shore crab, Cyclograpsus granulosus, is documented (GenBank accession number: LN624373), which makes it the third for genera of the superfamily Grapsoidea. Cyclograpsus granulosus has a mitogenome of 16,300 bp consisting of 13 protein-coding genes, two ribosomal subunit genes, 22 transfer RNAs and a non-coding AT-rich region. The base composition of the C. granulosus mitogenome is 36.15% for T, 19.54% for C, 33.14% for A and 11.17% for G, with an AT bias of 69.29%. The mitogenome gene order is atypical for the brachyuran crabs, but is identical to species of the genus Eriocheir from the same family.
  9. Tan MH, Gan HM, Lee YP, Austin CM
    Mitochondrial DNA A DNA Mapp Seq Anal, 2016 11;27(6):3983-3984.
    PMID: 25541305
    The mitochondrial genome sequence of the porcellanid crab, Petrolisthes haswelli is provided, making it the second for the family Porcellanidae and the third for the superfamily Galatheoidea. Petrolisthes haswelli has a mitogenome of 15,348 bp consisting of 13 protein-coding genes, two ribosomal subunit genes, 22 transfer RNAs and a non-coding AT-rich region. The base composition of the P. haswelli mitogenome is 35.66% for T, 18.65% for C, 34.35% for A and 11.34% for G, with an AT bias of 70.01%. The mitogenome gene order is identical to the mitogenome of Neopetrolisthes maculatus, the only other species of the family with a sequenced mitogenome.
  10. Tan MH, Gan HM, Lee YP, Austin CM
    PMID: 25423512 DOI: 10.3109/19401736.2014.982587
    The mitochondrial genome sequence of the ghost crab, Ocypode ceratophthalmus, is documented (GenBank accession number: LN611669) in this article. This is the first mitogenome for the family Ocypodidae and the second for the order Ocypodoidea. Ocypode ceratophthalmus has a mitogenome of 15,564 base pairs consisting of 13 protein-coding genes, two ribosomal subunit genes, 22 transfer RNAs and a non-coding AT-rich region. The base composition of the O. ceratophthalmus mitogenome is 35.78% for T, 19.36% for C, 33.73% for A and 11.13% for G, with an AT bias of 69.51% and the gene order is the typical arrangement for brachyuran crabs.
  11. Tan MH, Gan HM, Lee YP, Austin CM
    PMID: 25423510 DOI: 10.3109/19401736.2014.982585
    The Mictyris longicarpus (soldier crab) complete mitochondrial genome sequence is reported making it the first for the family Mictyridae and the second for the superfamily Ocypodoidea. The mitogenome is 15,548 base pairs made up of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal subunit genes, 22 transfer RNAs and a non-coding AT-rich region. The soldier crab mitogenome gene order is characteristic of brachyuran crabs with a base composition of 36.58% for T, 19.15% for C, 32.43% for A and 11.83% for G, with an AT bias of 69.01%.
  12. Gan HY, Gan HM, Lee YP, Austin CM
    Mitochondrial DNA A DNA Mapp Seq Anal, 2016 11;27(6):3985-3986.
    PMID: 25543913
    The complete mitochondrial genome of the Bass yabby Trypaea australiensis was obtained from a partial genome scan using the MiSeq sequencing system. The T. australiensis mitogenome is 16,821 bp in length (70.25% A + T content) made up of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal subunit genes, 22 transfer RNAs and a putative 1977 bp non-coding AT-rich region. This Trypaea mitogenome sequence is the 5th for the family Callianassidae and represents a new gene order for the Decapoda involving protein-coding, rRNA and tRNA genes and the control region.
  13. Gan HY, Gan HM, Lee YP, Austin CM
    PMID: 25693708 DOI: 10.3109/19401736.2015.1007311
    The mitochondrial genome of the rock pool prawn (Palaemon serenus), is sequenced, making it the third for genera of the family Palaemonidae and the first for the genus Palaemon. The mitogenome is 15,967 base pairs in length and comprises 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal subunit genes, 22 transfer RNAs and a non-coding AT-rich region. The P. serenus mitogenome has an AT bias of 58.97% and a base composition of 29.79% for T, 24.14% for C, 29.18% for A, and 16.89% for G. The mitogenome gene order of P. serenus is identical to Exopalaemon carinicauda.
  14. Gan HY, Gan HM, Lee YP, Austin CM
    PMID: 25693707 DOI: 10.3109/19401736.2015.1007312
    The mitochondrial genome sequence of the Australian freshwater shrimp, Paratya australiensis, is presented, which is the fourth for genera of the superfamily Atyoidea and the first atyid from the southern hemisphere. The base composition of the P. australiensis, mitogenome is 33.55% for T, 18.24% for C, 35.16% for A, and 13.06% for G, with an AT bias of 71.58%. It has a mitogenome of 15,990 base pairs comprised of 13 protein-coding, 2 ribosomal subunit and 22 transfer RNAs genes and a non-coding AT-rich region. The mitogenome gene order for the species is typical for atyid shrimps, which conform to the primitive pan crustacean model.
  15. Austin CM, Tan MH, Gan HY, Gan HM
    Mitochondrial DNA A DNA Mapp Seq Anal, 2016 11;27(6):4176-4177.
    PMID: 25630729
    Next-Gen sequencing was used to recover the complete mitochondrial genome of Cherax tenuimanus. The mitogenome consists of 15,797 base pairs (68.14% A + T content) containing 13 protein-coding genes, two ribosomal subunit genes, 22 transfer RNAs, and a 779 bp non-coding AT-rich region. Mitogenomes have now been recovered for all six species of Cherax native to Western Australia.
  16. Gan HM, Tan MH, Lee YP, Austin CM
    PMID: 25329292 DOI: 10.3109/19401736.2014.974174
    The mitogenome of the Australian freshwater blackfish, Gadopsis marmoratus was recovered coverage by genome skimming using the MiSeq sequencer (GenBank Accession Number: NC_024436). The blackfish mitogenome has 16,407 base pairs made up of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal subunit genes, 22 transfer RNAs, and a 819 bp non-coding AT-rich region. This is the 5th mitogenome sequence to be reported for the family Percichthyidae.
  17. Gan HM, Tan MH, Lee YP, Austin CM
    PMID: 25329290 DOI: 10.3109/19401736.2014.974173
    The mitochondrial genome sequence of the Australian tadpole shrimp, Triops australiensis is presented (GenBank Accession Number: NC_024439) and compared with other Triops species. Triops australiensis has a mitochondrial genome of 15,125 base pairs consisting of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal subunit genes, 22 transfer RNAs, and a non-coding AT-rich region. The T. australiensis mitogenome is composed of 36.4% A, 16.1% C, 12.3% G and 35.1% T. The mitogenome gene order conforms to the primitive arrangement for Branchiopod crustaceans, which is also conserved within the Pancrustacean.
  18. Tan MH, Gan HM, Lee YP, Austin CM
    PMID: 25103431 DOI: 10.3109/19401736.2014.947587
    The mitochondrial genome sequence of the stone crab, Myomenippe fornasinii, second of the superfamily Eriphioidea is documented. Myomenippe fornasinii has a mitogenome of 15,658 base pairs consisting of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal subunit genes, 22 transfer RNAs and a non-coding AT-rich region. The base composition of the M. fornasinii mitogenome is 36.10% for T, 18.52% for C, 35.48% for A, and 9.90% for G, with an AT bias of 71.58%. The mitogenome gene order conforms to what is the standard arrangement for brachyuran crabs.
  19. Tan MH, Gan HM, Lee YP, Austin CM
    PMID: 25103440 DOI: 10.3109/19401736.2014.945554
    The mitochondrial genome sequence of the Morton Bay bug, Thenus orientalis, is documented, which makes it the second mitogenome for species of the family Scyllaridae and the ninth for members of the superfamily Palinuroidae. Thenus orientalis has a mitogenome of 16,826 base pairs consisting of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal subunit genes, 23 transfer RNAs, and a non-coding AT-rich region. The base composition of the T. orientalis mitogenome is 31.31% for T, 23.77% for C, 31.05% for A, and 13.87% for G, with an AT bias of 62.36%. In addition to a duplicated trnS1 and several other tRNA gene rearrangements, the mitogenome gene order has novel protein coding gene order with the nad6 and cob genes translocated as a block to a location downstream of the nad3 gene.
  20. Tan MH, Gan HM, Lee YP, Austin CM
    PMID: 25090400 DOI: 10.3109/19401736.2014.945553
    The complete mitochondrial genome of the swimming crab Thalamita crenata was obtained from a partial genome scan using the MiSeq sequencing system. The Thalamita crenata mitogenome has 15,787 base pairs (70% A+T content) made up of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal subunit genes, 22 transfer RNAs, and a putative 897 bp non-coding AT-rich region. This Thalamita mitogenome sequence is the first for the genus and the eighth for the family Portunidae.
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