Displaying all 6 publications

Abstract:
Sort:
  1. Zong Z, Wang X, Deng Y
    PMID: 27244959
    A previously healthy Chinese male working in Malaysia returned to China with high fever. A blood culture showed Burkholderia pseudomallei strain WCBP1. This isolate was sequenced, showing type, ST881, which appears to be present in Malaysia. WCP1 had unusual susceptibility to aminoglycosides and habored the Yersinia-like fimbrial gene cluster for virulence. The patient's condition deteriorated rapidly but he recovered after receiving meropenem and intensive care support. Melioidosis is a potential problem among Chinese imigrant workers with strains new to China being identified.
  2. Phua J, Joynt GM, Nishimura M, Deng Y, Myatra SN, Chan YH, et al.
    Intensive Care Med, 2016 Jul;42(7):1118-27.
    PMID: 27071388 DOI: 10.1007/s00134-016-4347-y
    PURPOSE: To compare the attitudes of physicians towards withholding and withdrawing life-sustaining treatments in intensive care units (ICUs) in low-middle-income Asian countries and regions with those in high-income ones, and to explore differences in the role of families and surrogates, legal risks, and financial considerations between these countries and regions.

    METHODS: Questionnaire study conducted in May-December 2012 on 847 physicians from 255 ICUs in 10 low-middle-income countries and regions according to the World Bank's classification, and 618 physicians from 211 ICUs in six high-income countries and regions.

    RESULTS: After we accounted for personal, ICU, and hospital characteristics on multivariable analyses using generalised linear mixed models, physicians from low-middle-income countries and regions were less likely to limit cardiopulmonary resuscitation, mechanical ventilation, vasopressors and inotropes, tracheostomy and haemodialysis than those from high-income countries and regions. They were more likely to involve families in end-of-life care discussions and to perceive legal risks with limitation of life-sustaining treatments and do-not-resuscitate orders. Nonetheless, they were also more likely to accede to families' requests to withdraw life-sustaining treatments in a patient with an otherwise reasonable chance of survival on financial grounds in a case scenario (adjusted odds ratio 5.05, 95 % confidence interval 2.69-9.51, P 

  3. Phua J, Joynt GM, Nishimura M, Deng Y, Myatra SN, Chan YH, et al.
    JAMA Intern Med, 2015 Mar;175(3):363-71.
    PMID: 25581712 DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2014.7386
    Little data exist on end-of-life care practices in intensive care units (ICUs) in Asia.
  4. Hu D, Zhu Z, Li S, Deng Y, Wu Y, Zhang N, et al.
    PLoS Pathog., 2019 Jun;15(6):e1007836.
    PMID: 31242272 DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1007836
    Dengue is the most widespread vector-borne viral disease caused by dengue virus (DENV) for which there are no safe, effective drugs approved for clinical use. Here, by using sequential antigen panning of a yeast antibody library derived from healthy donors against the DENV envelop protein domain III (DIII) combined with depletion by an entry defective DIII mutant, we identified a cross-reactive human monoclonal antibody (mAb), m366.6, which bound with high affinity to DENV DIII from all four DENV serotypes. Immunogenetic analysis indicated that m366.6 is a germline-like mAb with very few somatic mutations from the closest VH and Vλ germline genes. Importantly, we demonstrated that it potently neutralized DENV both in vitro and in the mouse models of DENV infection without detectable antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) effect. The epitope of m366.6 was mapped to the highly conserved regions on DIII, which may guide the design of effective dengue vaccine immunogens. Furthermore, as the first germline-like mAb derived from a naïve antibody library that could neutralize all four DENV serotypes, the m366.6 can be a tool for exploring mechanisms of DENV infection, and is a promising therapeutic candidate.
  5. Klionsky DJ, Abdelmohsen K, Abe A, Abedin MJ, Abeliovich H, Acevedo Arozena A, et al.
    Autophagy, 2016;12(1):1-222.
    PMID: 26799652 DOI: 10.1080/15548627.2015.1100356
Related Terms
Filters
Contact Us

Please provide feedback to Administrator (tengcl@gmail.com)

External Links