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  1. Chong YH, Ng TKW
    Med J Malaysia, 1991 Mar;46(1):41-50.
    PMID: 1836037
    A major public health concern of affluent nations is the excessive consumption of dietary fats which are now closely linked to coronary heart disease. Against this scenario, the tropical oils and palm oil in particular, have been cast as major villains in the U.S.A., despite the fact that palm oil consumption there is negligible. The unsuspecting public may not realise that the call to avoid palm oil is nothing more than a trade ploy since in recent years palm oil has been very competitive and has gained a major share of the world's edible oils and fats market. Many also lose sight of the fact that, palm oil, like other edible oils and fats, is an important component of the diet. The allegation that palm oil consumption leads to raised blood cholesterol levels and is therefore atherogenic is without scientific foundation. Examination of the chemical and fatty acid composition of palm oil or its liquid fraction should convince most nutritionists that the oil has little cholesterol-raising potential. The rationale for these are: it is considered cholesterol free. its major saturated fatty acid, palmitic acid (16:0) has recently been shown to be neutral in its cholesterolaemic effect, particularly in situations where the LDL receptors have not been down-regulated by dietary means or through a genetic effect. palm oil contains negligible amounts (less than 1.5%) of the hypercholesterolemic saturated fatty acids, namely lauric acid (12:0) and myristic acid (14:0). it has moderately rich amounts of the hypocholesterolaemic, monounsaturated oleic acid (18:1, omega-9) and adequate amounts of linoleic acid. (18:2, omega-6). It contains minor components such as the vitamin E tocotrienols which are not only powerful antioxidants but are also natural inhibitors of cholesterol synthesis. Feeding experiments in various animal species and humans also do not support the allegation that palm oil is atherogenic. On the contrary, palm oil consumption reduces blood cholesterol in comparison with the traditional sources of saturated fats such as coconut oil, dairy and animal fats. In addition, palm oil consumption may raise HDL levels and reduce platelet aggregability. As with all nutrients, there is a need to obtain a balance of different fatty acids found in fats in edible oils and other food sources. There is no single ideal source of fat that answers to the recent American Heart Association's call to reflect a 1:1:1 ratio of saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats in relation to the recommended dietary fat intake of 30% of calories or less.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)
    Matched MeSH terms: Dietary Fats/pharmacology*
  2. Teng KT, Voon PT, Cheng HM, Nesaretnam K
    Lipids, 2010 May;45(5):385-92.
    PMID: 20437207 DOI: 10.1007/s11745-010-3416-1
    Knowledge about the effects of dietary fats on subclinical inflammation and cardiovascular disease risk are mainly derived from studies conducted in Western populations. Little information is available on South East Asian countries. This current study investigated the chronic effects on serum inflammatory markers, lipids, and lipoproteins of three vegetable oils. Healthy, normolipidemic subjects (n = 41; 33 females, 8 males) completed a randomized, single-blind, crossover study. The subjects consumed high oleic palm olein (HOPO diet: 15% of energy 18:1n-9, 9% of energy 16:0), partially hydrogenated soybean oil (PHSO diet: 7% of energy 18:1n-9, 10% of energy 18:1 trans) and an unhydrogenated palm stearin (PST diet: 11% of energy 18:1n-9, 14% of energy 16:0). Each dietary period lasted 5 weeks with a 7 days washout period. The PHSO diet significantly increased serum concentrations of high sensitivity C-reactive protein compared to HOPO and PST diets (by 26, 23%, respectively; P < 0.05 for both) and significantly decreased interleukin-8 (IL-8) compared to PST diet (by 12%; P < 0.05). In particular PHSO diet, and also PST diet, significantly increased total:HDL cholesterol ratio compared to HOPO diet (by 23, 13%, respectively; P < 0.05), with the PST diet having a lesser effect than the PHSO diet (by 8%; P < 0.05). The use of vegetable oils in their natural state might be preferred over one that undergoes the process of hydrogenation in modulating blood lipids and inflammation.
    Matched MeSH terms: Dietary Fats/pharmacology*
  3. Sundram K, Hayes KC, Siru OH
    Am J Clin Nutr, 1994 Apr;59(4):841-6.
    PMID: 8147328
    In a double-blind crossover study, 17 normocholesterolemic male volunteers were fed carefully designed whole-food diets in which 5% of energy was exchanged between palmitic (16:0) and lauric + myristic acids (12:0 + 14:0) whereas all other fatty acids were held constant. Resident males received each diet during separate 4-wk periods. The test diets supplied approximately 30% of energy as fat and 200 mg cholesterol/d. Compared with the 12:0 + 14:0-rich diet, the 16:0-rich diet produced a 9% lower serum cholesterol concentration, reflected primarily by a lower (11%) low-density-lipoprotein-cholesterol concentration and, to a lesser extent, high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol. No diet-induced changes were noted in the cholesterol content of other lipoproteins, nor did exchange of saturated fatty acids affect the triglyceride concentration in serum or lipoprotein fractions. These data indicate that a dietary 12:0 + 14:0 combination produces a higher serum cholesterol concentration than does 16:0 in healthy normocholesterolemic young men fed a low-cholesterol diet.
    Matched MeSH terms: Dietary Fats/pharmacology*
  4. Tan BL, Norhaizan ME
    Nutrients, 2019 Oct 25;11(11).
    PMID: 31731503 DOI: 10.3390/nu11112579
    Cognitive dysfunction is linked to chronic low-grade inflammatory stress that contributes to cell-mediated immunity in creating an oxidative environment. Food is a vitally important energy source; it affects brain function and provides direct energy. Several studies have indicated that high-fat consumption causes overproduction of circulating free fatty acids and systemic inflammation. Immune cells, free fatty acids, and circulating cytokines reach the hypothalamus and initiate local inflammation through processes such as microglial proliferation. Therefore, the role of high-fat diet (HFD) in promoting oxidative stress and neurodegeneration is worthy of further discussion. Of particular interest in this article, we highlight the associations and molecular mechanisms of HFD in the modulation of inflammation and cognitive deficits. Taken together, a better understanding of the role of oxidative stress in cognitive impairment following HFD consumption would provide a useful approach for the prevention of cognitive dysfunction.
    Matched MeSH terms: Dietary Fats/pharmacology*
  5. Abdul Ghani ZDF, Ab Rashid AH, Shaari K, Chik Z
    Appl Biochem Biotechnol, 2019 Oct;189(2):690-708.
    PMID: 31111377 DOI: 10.1007/s12010-019-03042-w
    The present studies are to evaluate the ability of PB to induce weight loss and urine metabolite profile of Piper betle L. (PB) leaf extracts using metabolomics approach. Dried PB leaves were extracted with ethanol 70% and the studies were performed in different groups of rats fed with high fat (HFD) and normal diet (ND). Then, fed with the PB extract with 100, 300, and 500 mg/kg and two negative control groups given water (WTR). The body weights were monitored and evaluated. Urine was collected and 1H NMR-based metabolomics approach was used to detect the metabolite changes. Results showed that PB-treated group demonstrated inhibition of body weight gain. The trajectory of urine metabolites showed that PB-treated group gave the different distribution from week 12 to 16 compared with the control groups. In 1H NMR metabolomic approach analysis, the urine metabolites gave the best separation in principle component 1 and 3, with 40.0% and 9.56% of the total variation. Shared and unique structures (SUS) plot model showed that higher concentration PB-treated group was characterized by high level of indole-3-acetate, aspartate, methanol, histidine, and creatine, thus caused an increased the metabolic function and maintaining the body weight of the animals treated.
    Matched MeSH terms: Dietary Fats/pharmacology
  6. Royan M, Meng GY, Othman F, Sazili AQ, Navidshad B
    Int J Mol Sci, 2011;12(12):8581-95.
    PMID: 22272093 DOI: 10.3390/ijms12128581
    An experiment was conducted on broiler chickens to study the effects of different dietary fats (Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), fish oil, soybean oil, or their mixtures, as well as palm oil, as a more saturated fat), with a as fed dose of 7% for single fat and 3.5 + 3.5% for the mixtures, on Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors (PPARs) gene expression and its relation with body fat deposits. The CLA used in this experiment was CLA LUTA60 which contained 60% CLA, so 7% and 3.5% dietary inclusions of CLA LUTA60 were equal to 4.2% and 2.1% CLA, respectively. Higher abdominal fat pad was found in broiler chickens fed with a diet containing palm oil compared to chickens in the other experimental groups (P ≤ 0.05). The diets containing CLA resulted in an increased fat deposition in the liver of broiler chickens (P ≤ 0.05). The only exception was related to the birds fed with diets containing palm oil or fish oil + soybean oil, where contents of liver fat were compared to the CLA + fish oil treatment. PPARγ gene in adipose tissue of chickens fed with palm oil diet was up-regulated compared to other treatments (P ≤ 0.001), whereas no significant differences were found in adipose PPARγ gene expression between chickens fed with diets containing CLA, fish oil, soybean oil or the mixture of these fats. On the other hand, the PPARα gene expression in liver tissue was up-regulated in response to the dietary fish oil inclusion and the differences were also significant for both fish oil and CLA + fish oil diets compared to the diets with palm oil, soybean oil or CLA as the only oil source (P ≤ 0.001). In conclusion, the results of present study showed that there was a relationship between the adipose PPARγ gene up-regulation and abdominal fat pad deposition for birds fed with palm oil diet, while no deference was detected in n-3 and n-6 fatty acids, as well as CLA on PPARγ down regulation in comparison to a more saturated fat. When used on its own, fish oil was found to be a more effective fat in up-regulating hepatic PPARα gene expression and this effect was related to a less fat deposition in liver tissue. A negative correlation coefficient (-0.3) between PPARα relative gene expression and liver tissue fat content confirm the anti-lipogenic effect of PPARα, however, the change in these parameters was not completely parallel.
    Matched MeSH terms: Dietary Fats/pharmacology*
  7. Tai ES, Corella D, Deurenberg-Yap M, Cutter J, Chew SK, Tan CE, et al.
    J Nutr, 2003 Nov;133(11):3399-408.
    PMID: 14608050
    We have previously reported an interaction between -514C>T polymorphism at the hepatic lipase (HL) gene and dietary fat on high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) metabolism in a representative sample of white subjects participating in the Framingham Heart Study. Replication of these findings in other populations will provide proof for the relevance and consistency of this marker as a tool for risk assessment and more personalized cardiovascular disease prevention. Therefore, we examined this gene-nutrient interaction in a representative sample of Singaporeans (1324 Chinese, 471 Malays and 375 Asian Indians) whose dietary fat intake was recorded by a validated questionnaire. When no stratification by fat intake was considered, the T allele was associated with higher plasma HDL-C concentrations (P = 0.001), higher triglyceride (TG) concentrations (P = 0.001) and higher HDL-C/TG ratios (P = 0.041). We found a highly significant interaction (P = 0.001) between polymorphism and fat intake in determining TG concentration and the HDL-C/TG ratio (P = 0.001) in the overall sample even after adjustment for potential confounders. Thus, TT subjects showed higher TG concentrations only when fat intake supplied >30% of total energy. This interaction was also found when fat intake was considered as continuous (P = 0.035). Moreover, in the upper tertile of fat intake, TT subjects had 45% more TG than CC individuals (P < 0.01). For HDL-C concentration, the gene-diet interaction was significant (P = 0.015) only in subjects of Indian origin. In conclusion, our results indicate that there are differences in the association of -514C>T polymorphism with plasma lipids according to dietary intake and ethnic background. Specifically, the TT genotype is associated with a more atherogenic lipid profile when subjects consume diets with a fat content > 30%.
    Matched MeSH terms: Dietary Fats/pharmacology*
  8. Loganathan R, Vethakkan SR, Radhakrishnan AK, Razak GA, Kim-Tiu T
    Eur J Clin Nutr, 2019 04;73(4):609-616.
    PMID: 29946115 DOI: 10.1038/s41430-018-0236-5
    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: The consumption of antioxidant-rich cooking oil such as red palm olein may be cardioprotective from the perspective of subclinical inflammation and endothelial function.

    SUBJECTS/METHODS: Using a crossover design, we conducted a randomised controlled trial in 53 free-living high-risk abdominally overweight subjects, comparing the effects of incorporating red palm olein (with palm olein as control) in a supervised isocaloric 2100 kcal diet of 30% en fat, two-thirds (45 g/day) of which were derived from the test oil for a period of 6 weeks each.

    RESULTS: We did not observe a significant change in interleukin-6 (IL-6), in parallel with other pro-inflammatory (tumour necrosis factor-β, interleukin-1β, IL-1β, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, hsCRP) and endothelial function (soluble intercellular adhesion molecules, sICAM, soluble intravascular adhesion molecules, sVCAM) parameters. Interestingly, we observed a significant reduction in oxidised LDL levels (P 

    Matched MeSH terms: Dietary Fats/pharmacology*
  9. Filippou A, Teng KT, Berry SE, Sanders TA
    Eur J Clin Nutr, 2014 Sep;68(9):1036-41.
    PMID: 25052227 DOI: 10.1038/ejcn.2014.141
    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Dietary triacylglycerols containing palmitic acid in the sn-2 position might impair insulin release and increase plasma glucose.

    SUBJECTS/METHODS: We used a cross-over designed feeding trial in 53 healthy Asian men and women (20-50 years) to test this hypothesis by exchanging 20% energy of palm olein (PO; control) with randomly interesterified PO (IPO) or high oleic acid sunflower oil (HOS). After a 2-week run-in period on PO, participants were fed PO, IPO and HOS for 6 week consecutively in randomly allocated sequences. Fasting (midpoint and endpoint) and postprandial blood at the endpoint following a test meal (3.54 MJ, 14 g protein, 85 g carbohydrate and 50 g fat as PO) were collected for the measurement of C-peptide, insulin, glucose, plasma glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and glucagon-like peptide-1, lipids and apolipoproteins; pre-specified primary and secondary outcomes were postprandial changes in C-peptide and plasma glucose.

    RESULTS: Low density lipoprotein cholesterol was 0.3 mmol/l (95% confidence interval (95% CI)) 0.1, 0.5; P<0.001) lower on HOS than on PO or IPO as predicted, indicating good compliance to the dietary intervention. There were no significant differences (P=0.58) between diets among the 10 male and 31 female completers in the incremental area under the curve (0-2 h) for C-peptide in nmol.120 min/l: GM (95% CI) were PO 220 (196, 245), IPO 212 (190, 235) and HOS 224 (204, 244). Plasma glucose was 8% lower at 2 h on IPO vs PO and HOS (both P<0.05).

    CONCLUSION: Palmitic acid in the sn-2 position does not adversely impair insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis.

    Matched MeSH terms: Dietary Fats/pharmacology
  10. Kassem AA, Abu Bakar MZ, Yong Meng G, Mustapha NM
    ScientificWorldJournal, 2012;2012:851437.
    PMID: 22489205 DOI: 10.1100/2012/851437
    The objective of this paper is to study the effects of varying dietary levels of n-6 : n-3 fatty acid ratio on plasma and tissue fatty acid composition in rat. The treatment groups included control rats fed chow diet only, rats fed 50% soybean oil (SBO): 50% cod liver oil (CLO) (1 : 1), 84% SBO: 16% CLO (6 : 1), 96% SBO: 4% CLO (30 : 1). Blood samples were taken at day 15 of pregnancy, and the plasma and tissue were analyzed for fatty acid profile. The n-3 PUFA in plasma of Diet 1 : 1 group was significantly higher than the other diet groups, while the total n-6 PUFA in plasma was significantly higher in Diet 30 : 1 group as compared to the control and Diet 1 : 1 groups. The Diet 1 : 1 group showed significantly greater percentages of total n-3 PUFA and docosahexaenoic acid in adipose and liver tissue, and this clearly reflected the contribution of n-3 fatty acids from CLO. The total n-6 PUFA, linoleic acid, and arachidonic acid were significantly difference in Diet 30 : 1 as compared to Diet 1 : 1 and control group. These results demonstrated that the dietary ratio of n-6 : n-3 fatty acid ratio significantly affected plasma and tissue fatty acids profile in pregnant rat.
    Matched MeSH terms: Dietary Fats/pharmacology*
  11. Sundram K, French MA, Clandinin MT
    Eur J Nutr, 2003 Aug;42(4):188-94.
    PMID: 12923649
    Partial hydrogenation of oil results in fats containing unusual isomeric fatty acids characterized by cis and trans configurations. Hydrogenated fats containing trans fatty acids increase plasma total cholesterol (TC) and LDL-cholesterol while depressing HDL-cholesterol levels. Identifying the content of trans fatty acids by food labeling is overshadowed by a reluctance of health authorities to label saturates and trans fatty acids separately. Thus, it is pertinent to compare the effects of trans to saturated fatty acids using stable isotope methodology to establish if the mechanism of increase in TC and LDL-cholesterol is due to the increase in the rate of endogenous synthesis of cholesterol. Ten healthy normocholesterolemic female subjects consumed each of two diets containing approximately 30% of energy as fat for a fourweek period. One diet was high in palmitic acid (10.6% of energy) from palm olein and the other diet exchanged 5.6% of energy as partially hydrogenated fat for palmitic acid. This fat blend resulted in monounsaturated fatty acids decreasing by 4.9 % and polyunsaturated fats increasing by 2.7%. The hydrogenated fat diet treatment provided 3.1% of energy as elaidic acid. For each dietary treatment, the fractional synthesis rates for cholesterol were measured using deuterium-labeling procedures and blood samples were obtained for blood lipid and lipoprotein measurements. Subjects exhibited a higher total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol level when consuming the diet containing trans fatty acids while also depressing the HDL-cholesterol level. Consuming the partially hydrogenated fat diet treatment increased the fractional synthesis rate of free cholesterol. Consumption of hydrogenated fats containing trans fatty acids in comparison to a mixtur e of palmitic and oleic acids increase plasma cholesterol levels apparently by increasing endogenous synthesis of cholesterol.
    Matched MeSH terms: Dietary Fats/pharmacology
  12. Tan DT, Khor HT, Low WH, Ali A, Gapor A
    Am J Clin Nutr, 1991 04;53(4 Suppl):1027S-1030S.
    PMID: 2012011 DOI: 10.1093/ajcn/53.4.1027S
    The effect of a capsulated palm-oil-vitamin E concentrate (palmvitee) on human serum and lipoprotein lipids was assessed. Each palmvitee capsule contains approximately 18, approximately 42, and approximately 240 mg of tocopherols, tocotrienols, and palm olein, respectively. All volunteers took one palmvitee capsule per day for 30 consecutive days. Overnight fasting blood was taken from each volunteer before and after the experiment. Serum lipids and lipoproteins were analyzed by using the enzymatic CHOD-PAP method. Our results showed that palmvitee lowered both serum total cholesterol (TC) and low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) concentrations in all the volunteers. The magnitude of reduction of serum TC ranged from 5.0% to 35.9% whereas the reduction of LDL-C values ranged from 0.9% to 37.0% when compared with their respective starting values. The effect of palmvitee on triglycerides (TGs) and HDL-C was not consistent. Our results show that the palmvitee has a hypocholesterolemic effect.
    Matched MeSH terms: Dietary Fats/pharmacology*
  13. Ebrahimi M, Rajion MA, Goh YM
    Nutrients, 2014 Sep;6(9):3913-28.
    PMID: 25255382 DOI: 10.3390/nu6093913
    Alteration of the lipid content and fatty acid (FA) composition of foods can result in a healthier product. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of flaxseed oil or sunflower oil in the goat diet on fatty acid composition of muscle and expression of lipogenic genes in the semitendinosus (ST) muscle. Twenty-one entire male Boer kid goats were fed diets containing different levels of linoleic acid (LA) and α-linolenic acid (LNA) for 100 days. Inclusion of flaxseed oil increased (p < 0.05) the α-linolenic acid (C18:3n-3) concentration in the ST muscle. The diet high in α-linolenic acid (p < 0.05) decreased the arachidonic acid (C20:4n-6) and conjugated linolenic acid (CLA) c-9 t-11 content in the ST muscle. There was a significant (p < 0.05) upregulation of PPARα and PPARγ gene expression and downregulation of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) gene in the ST muscle for the high α-linolenic acid group compared with the low α-linolenic acid group. The results of the present study show that flaxseed oil as a source of α-linolenic acid can be incorporated into the diets of goats to enrich goat meat with n-3 fatty acids, upregulate the PPARα and PPARγ, and downregulate the SCD gene expression.
    Matched MeSH terms: Dietary Fats/pharmacology
  14. Tekeleselassie AW, Goh YM, Rajion MA, Motshakeri M, Ebrahimi M
    ScientificWorldJournal, 2013;2013:757593.
    PMID: 24294136 DOI: 10.1155/2013/757593
    This study was aimed to investigate the effects of dietary fatty acids on the accretion pattern of major fat pads, inguinal fat cellularity, and their relation with plasma leptin concentration. Forty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned into four groups and received the following diets for 22 weeks: (1) standard rat chow diet (CTRL), (2) CTRL + 10% (w/w) butter (HFAR), (3) CTRL + 3.33% (w/w) menhaden fish oil + 6.67% (w/w) soybean oil (MFAR), and (4) CTRL + 6.67% (w/w) menhaden fish oil + 3.33% (w/w) soybean oil (LFAR). Inguinal fat cellularity and plasma leptin concentration were measured in this study. Results for inguinal fat cellularity showed that the mean adipocyte number for the MFAR (9.2 ∗ 10⁵ ± 3.6) and LFAR (8.5 ∗ 10⁵ ± 5.1) groups was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than the rest, while the mean adipocyte diameter of HFAR group was larger (P < 0.05) (46.2 ± 2.8) than the rest. The plasma leptin concentration in the HFAR group was higher (P < 0.05) (3.22 ± 0.32 ng/mL), than the other groups. The higher inguinal fat cellularity clearly indicated the ability of the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and butter supplemented diets to induce hyperplasia and hypertrophy of fat cells, respectively, which caused adipocyte remodeling due to hyperleptinemia.
    Matched MeSH terms: Dietary Fats/pharmacology*
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