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  1. Tan PC, Norazilah MJ, Omar SZ
    Obstet Gynecol, 2013 Feb;121(2 Pt 1):291-298.
    PMID: 23232754 DOI: 10.1097/AOG.0b013e31827c5e99
    OBJECTIVE: To compare 5% dextrose-0.9% saline against 0.9% saline solution in the intravenous rehydration of hyperemesis gravidarum.

    METHODS: Women at their first hospitalization for hyperemesis gravidarum were enrolled on admission to the ward and randomly assigned to receive either 5% dextrose-0.9% saline or 0.9% saline by intravenous infusion at a rate 125 mL/h over 24 hours in a double-blind trial. All participants also received thiamine and an antiemetic intravenously. Oral intake was allowed as tolerated. Primary outcomes were resolution of ketonuria and well-being (by 10-point visual numerical rating scale) at 24 hours. Nausea visual numerical rating scale scores were obtained every 8 hours for 24 hours.

    RESULTS: Persistent ketonuria rates after the 24-hour study period were 10 of 101 (9.9%) compared with 11 of 101 (10.9%) (P>.99; relative risk 0.9, 95% confidence interval 0.4-2.2) and median (interquartile range) well-being scores at 24 hours were 9 (8-10) compared with 9 (8-9.5) (P=.73) in the 5% dextrose-0.9% saline and 0.9% saline arms, respectively. Repeated measures analysis of variance of the nausea visual numerical rating scale score as assessed every 8 hours during the 24-hour study period showed a significant difference in favor of the 5% dextrose-0.9% saline arm (P=.046) with the superiority apparent at 8 and 16 hours, but the advantage had dissipated by 24 hours. Secondary outcomes of vomiting, resolution of hyponatremia, hypochloremia and hypokalemia, length of hospitalization, duration of intravenous antiemetic, and rehydration were not different.

    CONCLUSIONS: Intravenous rehydration with 5% dextrose-0.9% saline or 0.9% saline solution in women hospitalized for hyperemesis gravidarum produced similar outcomes.

    CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN Register, www.controlled-trials.com/isrctn, ISRCTN65014409.

    LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: I.

    Matched MeSH terms: Glucose/therapeutic use*
  2. Tan PC, Norazilah MJ, Omar SZ
    Obstet Gynecol, 2013 Jun;121(6):1360.
    PMID: 23812475 DOI: 10.1097/AOG.0b013e31829395ef
    Matched MeSH terms: Glucose/therapeutic use*
  3. Chin M, Chin F
    Med J Malaysia, 1973 Mar;27(3):195-7.
    PMID: 4268923
    Matched MeSH terms: Glucose/therapeutic use*
  4. Lee WS, Lee SP, Boey CCM
    Med J Malaysia, 1999 Mar;54(1):22-5.
    PMID: 10972000
    Two hundred and ninety five children admitted with acute gastroenteritis from January 1, 1996 to December 31, 1996 to the Paediatric unit, University of Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, were reviewed. Eighty-nine percent of children received treatment before admission. Information regarding the type of treatment received were available in 152 (52%) cases. Eighty percent of them were prescribed medications, 40% were prescribed glucose-electrolyte mixtures, and 13% were advised a change of formula. Only 18 children (12%) were advised to take glucose-electrolyte mixtures alone. The four most common prescribed drugs were: antibiotics (43%), antipyretics (39%), antidiarrhoeal agents (30%), and antiemetics (24%). The use of antibiotics, antiemetics and antidiarrhoeal drugs for children with acute gastroenteritis among primary care doctors appears to be common. The use of glucose-electrolyte mixtures was uncommon.
    Matched MeSH terms: Glucose/therapeutic use
  5. Sinniah D, Sinniah R, Baskaran G, Pathmanathan R, Yamashita F, Yoshino M
    Acta Paediatr Jpn, 1990 Aug;32(4):462-8.
    PMID: 2288230
    Glucose and steroids have been used in the treatment of children with Reye's syndrome, while carnitine and coenzyme Q10 have been the subject of some recent studies which suggest that these agents may have a role in the treatment of Reye's syndrome and Reye-like syndrome due to margosa oil poisoning. Because of the paucity of causes of Reye's syndrome seen at any one centre, the clinical variability of the disease, and limited knowledge of definite aetiologic factors, controlled clinical trials are not easy to carry out or to interpret in human cases. These caveats were overcome by evaluation of these four treatment modalities in an established margosa-oil-induced animal model of Reye's syndrome. Effectiveness of the treatment modalities was determined from clinical response and histopathologic parameters (grading of light microscopic fatty changes and ultrastructural changes in the hepatocytes). Results show that carnitine per se produces a small improvement in survival, but statistically, more significant benefit is seen with glucose administration. Carnitine plus 10% dextrose appears to produce better results. Evaluation of coenzyme Q10 and carnitine on histopathologic parameters in the liver after a sublethal dose of margosa oil showed no obvious ameliorating effect on liver pathology. Steroids (dexamethasone/methylprednisolone) had no beneficial effects in reducing mortality, affecting glycogen storage or lipid accumulation. Changes in the mitochondria, ribosomes and endoplasmic reticulum were unaltered from the groups treated with margosa oil alone. While glucose and carnitine supplements appear to be beneficial, the other modes of therapy do not seem to hold much promise in the treatment of Reye-like syndrome in the margosa-oil-induced animal model.
    Matched MeSH terms: Glucose/therapeutic use*
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