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  1. Teh GC
    Urol. Oncol., 2010 Nov-Dec;28(6):682-5.
    PMID: 21062652 DOI: 10.1016/j.urolonc.2010.03.017
    With maturing functional and oncologic outcomes data, open partial nephrectomy (OPN) has become the standard of care for T1a renal tumor. Laparoscopic approach can provide a speedier recovery with less blood loss and postoperative pain. Presuming adequate laparoscopic expertise, laparoscopic partial nephrectomy can provide equivalent oncologic outcome as for OPN albeit with higher urologic complications rate and longer warm ischemia time. With refinement of technique and use of robotic assistant, the shortcomings of laparoscopic approach can be further reduced. This article is a mini-review on the current status of laparoscopic approach to partial nephrectomy in the management of small renal mass.
    Matched MeSH terms: Kidney Neoplasms/surgery*
  2. Shepherd ARH, Hoh IMY, Goh EH, Cohen PA, Steele D
    ANZ J Surg, 2017 Dec;87(12):1054-1056.
    PMID: 25962888 DOI: 10.1111/ans.13155
    Matched MeSH terms: Kidney Neoplasms/surgery
  3. Lu HT, Chong JL, Othman N, Vendargon S, Omar S
    J Med Case Rep, 2016 May 03;10(1):109.
    PMID: 27142514 DOI: 10.1186/s13256-016-0888-5
    BACKGROUND: Renal cell carcinoma is a potentially lethal cancer with aggressive behavior and it tends to metastasize. Renal cell carcinoma involves the inferior vena cava in approximately 15% of cases and it rarely extends into the right atrium. A majority of renal cell carcinoma are detected as incidental findings on imaging studies obtained for unrelated reasons. At presentation, nearly 25% of patients either have distant metastases or significant local-regional disease with no symptoms that can be attributed to renal cell carcinoma.

    CASE PRESENTATION: A 64-year-old Indian male with a past history of coronary artery bypass graft surgery, congestive heart failure, and diabetes mellitus complained of worsening shortness of breath for 2 weeks. Incidentally, a transthoracic echocardiography showed a "thumb-like" mass in his right atrium extending into his right ventricle through the tricuspid valve with each systole. Abdomen magnetic resonance imaging revealed a heterogenous lobulated mass in the upper and mid-pole of his right kidney with a tumor extending into his inferior vena cava and right atrium, consistent with our diagnosis of advanced renal cell carcinoma which was later confirmed by surgical excision and histology. Radical right nephrectomy, lymph nodes clearance, inferior vena cava cavatomy, and complete tumor thrombectomy were performed successfully. Perioperatively, he did not require cardiopulmonary bypass or deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. He had no recurrence during the follow-up period for more than 2 years after surgery.

    CONCLUSIONS: Advanced extension of renal cell carcinoma can occur with no apparent symptoms and be detected incidentally. In rare circumstances, atypical presentation of renal cell carcinoma should be considered in a patient presenting with right atrial mass detected by echocardiography. Renal cell carcinoma with inferior vena cava and right atrium extension is a complex surgical challenge, but excellent results can be obtained with proper patient selection, meticulous surgical techniques, and close perioperative patient care.

    Matched MeSH terms: Kidney Neoplasms/surgery
  4. Azarisman SM, Nor Azmi K
    Singapore Med J, 2007 Aug;48(8):779-82.
    PMID: 17657389
    A 39-year-old man was diagnosed with von Hippel-Lindau syndrome, which was associated with retinal haemangioblastoma, cervical cord haemangioblastoma and bilateral renal cell carcinoma. He subsequently underwent an arterial embolisation and cervical laminectomy, following a spinal angiogram of the cervical lesion. He also had a right radical nephrectomy, with no perioperative complications. However, on admission for the left radical nephrectomy, he was noted to have preoperative hypertension. Further investigation revealed an enlarged left adrenal gland on abdominal computed tomography scan and raised urinary catecholamines. We discuss the risk of renal cell carcinoma and phaeochromocytoma arising concomitantly in von Hippel-Lindau syndrome, and how best to investigate and manage them.
    Matched MeSH terms: Kidney Neoplasms/surgery
  5. Haritharan T, Sritharan S, Bhimji S
    Med. J. Malaysia, 2006 Oct;61(4):493-5.
    PMID: 17243531 MyJurnal
    Renal angiomyolipomas are innocuous benign tumours which rarely behave aggressively. This is a case of a 48 year old Malay lady presenting with right sided abdominal pain associated with a large right sided abdominal mass. She was diagnosed with renal angiomyolipoma of the right kidney complicated by inferior vena caval tumour thrombosis. She successfully underwent a radical nephrectomy and inferior vena caval thrombectomy using cardiopulmonary bypass and deep hypothermic circulatory arrest.
    Matched MeSH terms: Kidney Neoplasms/surgery
  6. Kaur G, Naik VR, Rahman MNG
    Singapore Med J, 2004 Mar;45(3):125-6.
    PMID: 15029415
    Diffusely-infiltrating mucinous adenocarcinoma of the renal pelvis associated with lithiasis and chronic gout is reported in a 61-year-old Malay man. The patient underwent left nephrectomy and vesiculo-lithotomy. This tumour is postulated to arise in response to chronic irritation of the urothelium.
    Matched MeSH terms: Kidney Neoplasms/surgery
  7. Jayaram G, Looi LM
    Malays J Pathol, 1994 Jun;16(1):83-7.
    PMID: 16329582
    A five-month-old male baby presented with an abdominal mass which was found on computerised tomography (CT) to be involving the left kidney. Nephrectomy and histopathological study showed morphological featues of a malignant rhabdoid tumour. The tumour cells stained strongly for cytokeratin and epithelial membrane antigen and less intensely for vimentin. Electron microscopy revealed concentric whorled arrays of intermediate filaments within the tumour cell cytoplasm. The child was put on post-operative chemotherapy and radiotherapy but developed bilateral lung metastases and died three months after surgery.
    Matched MeSH terms: Kidney Neoplasms/surgery
  8. Lim NK, Aik OT, Meng LL, Htun TH, Razack AH
    J Coll Physicians Surg Pak, 2014 Mar;24 Suppl 1:S68-70.
    PMID: 24718014 DOI: 03.2014/JCPSP.S68S70
    Superior vena caval syndrome (SVCS) is a debilitating condition attributed to malignancy in more than 70% of cases. However, solitary head and neck metastases arising from renal cell carcinomas without evidence of disease elsewhere are rare. We report a case of renal cell carcinoma presenting as a rapidly growing right cervical lymph node with compression on the subclavian vein causing superior vena caval syndrome (SVCS). There was pulmonary embolism as well. Biopsy of the neck mass confirmed metastatic clear cell carcinoma with primary found in the (L) kidney. The patient had partial response to focussed radiotherapy to neck mass and Sunitinib (tyrosine kinase inhibitor) before succumbing to the disease.
    Matched MeSH terms: Kidney Neoplasms/surgery
  9. Ho CC, Krishna KK, Praveen S, Goh EH, Lee BC, Zulkifli MZ
    Med. J. Malaysia, 2010 Sep;65(3):229-30.
    PMID: 21939176
    We present a case of a middle-aged man who was incidentally found to have right renal solid mass while investigating for his left eye proptosis. Computerised tomography (CT) scan confirmed the diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma and the tumour was successfully excised via open surgery. The histopathology examination revealed the 10x7x8 cm mass to be a clear cell type renal cell carcinoma. The rare presentation of this metastatic renal cell carcinoma, its diagnosis and management will be discussed.
    Matched MeSH terms: Kidney Neoplasms/surgery
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