Affiliations 

  • 1 Department of Chemical Pathology, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kelantan
  • 2 Department of Chemical Pathology, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 76750 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan
Med. J. Malaysia, 1995 Jun;50(2):150-5.
PMID: 7565185

Abstract

The incidence of breastfeeding among 96 mothers (88/96 were Malays) who were attending various clinics at Universiti Sains Malaysia Hospital and Kota Bharu General Hospital was about 95%. The feeding patterns show that about 72% of mothers gave mixed feedings (breastmilk plus infant formula) while only 30% gave exclusive breastmilk to their infants in the first six months. Two main reasons for giving mixed feedings were that mothers had to start working soon after giving birth and reported "insufficient milk". Mixed feedings were seen to be more prevalent in the higher income group mothers (> RM1000 per month). About 64% of them who breastfed their child continued to do so beyond 6 months. Regarding their knowledge on breastfeeding, most mothers (98%) knew that breastmilk is good for baby's health, economical, strengthens bonding between mother and child, and was sufficient for the sustenance of the baby. However, when asked about colostrum, 66% of mothers who breastfed their child threw away the colostrum before feeding; some of the reasons given were that colostrum is dirty, and not suitable for the baby's health and it might cause some diseases.

* Title and MeSH Headings from MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.