Affiliations 

  • 1 Human Genetics, Genome Institute of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore
  • 2 Cancer Research Malaysia, Sime Darby Medical Centre, Subang Jaya, Selangor, Malaysia
  • 3 Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
  • 4 Division of Oncology and Pathology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden
  • 5 AstraZeneca Nordic-Baltic, Södertälje, Sweden
  • 6 Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden
  • 7 Centre for Cancer Genetic Epidemiology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
  • 8 Genomics Center, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec-Université Laval Research Center, Canada Research Chair in Oncogenetics, Université Laval, Quebec City, Canada
Int. J. Cancer, 2019 03 01;144(5):1195-1204.
PMID: 30175445 DOI: 10.1002/ijc.31841

Abstract

Breast cancer patients with BRCA1/2-driven tumors may benefit from targeted therapy. It is not clear whether current BRCA screening guidelines are effective at identifying these patients. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of inherited BRCA1/2 pathogenic variants in a large, clinically representative breast cancer cohort and to estimate the proportion of BRCA1/2 carriers not detected by selectively screening individuals with the highest probability of being carriers according to current clinical guidelines. The study included 5,122 unselected Swedish breast cancer patients diagnosed from 2001 to 2008. Target sequence enrichment (48.48 Fluidigm Access Arrays) and sequencing were performed (Illumina Hi-Seq 2,500 instrument, v4 chemistry). Differences in patient and tumor characteristics of BRCA1/2 carriers who were already identified as part of clinical BRCA1/2 testing routines and additional BRCA1/2 carriers found by sequencing the entire study population were compared using logistic regression models. Ninety-two of 5,099 patients with valid variant calls were identified as BRCA1/2 carriers by screening all study participants (1.8%). Only 416 study participants (8.2%) were screened as part of clinical practice, but this identified 35 out of 92 carriers (38.0%). Clinically identified carriers were younger, less likely postmenopausal and more likely to be associated with familiar ovarian cancer compared to the additional carriers identified by screening all patients. More BRCA2 (34/42, 81.0%) than BRCA1 carriers (23/50, 46%) were missed by clinical screening. In conclusion, BRCA1/2 mutation prevalence in unselected breast cancer patients was 1.8%. Six in ten BRCA carriers were not detected by selective clinical screening of individuals.

* Title and MeSH Headings from MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.