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  1. Daood U, Fawzy AS
    Arch Oral Biol, 2019 Feb;98:195-203.
    PMID: 30502562 DOI: 10.1016/j.archoralbio.2018.10.019
    OBJECTIVE: To investigate effects of HIFU on macrophage phenotype, surface micro-topography and nano-scale surface mechanical properties of dental cementum.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Root discs (2 mm thickness) were cut apical to CEJ and sectioned into quadrants. HIFU setup with bowl-shaped piezo ceramic transducer submerged in a water tank was used for exposure on each specimen for 15 s, 30 s or 60 s. The specimens of the control group were left without any HIFU exposure. HIFU was generated with a continuous sinusoidal wave of 120Vpp amplitude, 250 KHZ resonance-frequency and highest ultrasonic pressure of ∼10 bar at the focus. Specimens for SEM were viewed, and micro-topography characterization performed, using AFM and Ra parameter and surface area (SA) calculated by specialized SPM surface analysis software. For nano-indentation testing, experiments were carried out using AFM. Macrophage cell isolation and culturing was performed on cementum to receive the HIFU treatment at different time periods. Raman spectroscopy were scanned to create spectra perpendicular to the cementum substrate to analyze generation of standard spectra for Raman intensity ratio of hydroxyapatite normalized to the peaks ν1 960 cm-1. Data was expressed as means ± standard deviations and analyzed by one-way ANOVA in term of Ra, SA, H and Er. Different points for fluorescence intensity ratio were analyzed by Raman using Wilcoxon rank sum test.

    RESULTS: HIFU exposure at 60 s removed the smear layer and most of cementum appeared smoothened. AFM characterisation, showed a slight decrease in the irregularity of the surface as exposure time increased. Intact macrophages can be identified in control and all experimental HIFU groups. The level of fluorescence for the control and HIFU 15 and 30 s were low as compared to HIFU 60 s.

    CONCLUSION: If HIFU can be successfully implemented, it may be a possible alternative to current methods used in periodontal therapy to achieve smooth root surfaces.

  2. Daood U, Fawzy AS
    Dent Mater, 2020 03;36(3):456-467.
    PMID: 32008748 DOI: 10.1016/j.dental.2020.01.005
    OBJECTIVE: The aim is to investigate the potential significance of combining minimally invasive high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) with hydroxyapatite (HA) nanorods treatment for the remineralization of demineralized coronal dentine-matrix.

    METHODS: HA having nanorods structure were synthetized using ultrasonication with precipitation method. HA nanorods were characterized by TEM for average-size/shape. Following phosphoric acid demineralization, dentine specimens were treated with HA-nanorods with/without subsequent HIFU exposure for 5 s, 10 s and 20 s then stored in artificial saliva for 1-month. Dentine specimens were characterized using different SEM and Raman spectroscopic techniques. In addition, the biochemical stability and HA-nanorods were examined using ATR-FTIR to observe attachment of nanoparticles. Also, surface nanoindentation properties were evaluated using AFM in tapping-mode.

    RESULTS: HA-nanorods displayed well-defined, homogenous plate-like nanostructure. TEM revealed intact collagen-fibrils network structure with high density due to obliteration of interfibrillar spaces with clear evidence of remineralization in combined HA/HIFU treatment. With HA-nanorods treatment collagen-network structure was visible, consisting of fibrils interlaced into a compact pattern with evidence of minerals deposition. AFM investigation revealed clear mineral formation with the increase of HIFU exposure time. Bands associated with inorganic phase dominate well in HIFU exposed specimens with PO stretching within dentine mineral identified at 960 cm-1. Characteristic dentine structure for control and HIFU 20 s specimens is reflected as oscillatory mean Amide-I intensity with measurement giving a precise sinusoidal response of polarization angle β within dentinal tissue. Nanoindentation testing showed a gradual significant increase in elastic-modulus with the increase in HIFU exposure time after 1-month storage. FTIR spectrum of the HIFU exposed dentine displayed bands at 1650 cm-1, 1580 cm-1 and 1510 cm-1 that can be attributed to Amide-I, II and III.

    SIGNIFICANCE: The synergetic effect of HIFU exposure on remineralization potential of demineralized dentine-matrix following nano-hydroxyapatite treatment was revealed. This synergetic effect is dependent on HIFU exposure time.

  3. Daood U, Matinlinna JP, Fawzy AS
    Dent Mater, 2019 02;35(2):356-367.
    PMID: 30528297 DOI: 10.1016/j.dental.2018.11.031
    OBJECTIVE: Effect of d-alpha-tocopheryl poly(ethyleneglycol)-1000-succinate (VE-TPGS) with riboflavin-5'-phosphate solution on crosslinking of dentine collagen was investigated to analyze collagen's structural integrity.

    METHODS: VE-TPGS was added to RF-solution, at RF/VE-TPGS (w/w) ratios of 0.125/0.250 and 0.125/0.500. Demineralized dentine beams were used (10wt.% phosphoric acid), rinsed using deionized-water and analysed using ELISA (Human MMP2 ELISA; Human CTSK/Cathepsin-K for MMP2 and Cathepsin K analysis). AFM of dentine collagen-fibrils structure was done before and after dentine specimens' placement in mineralization solution and tested after 14days in artificial saliva/collagenase (AS/Co) solution. The specimens were tested after 24h in mineralization solution for surface/bulk elastic modulus. Nano-indentation was carried out for each specimen on intertubular-dentine with lateral spacing of 400nm. Reduced elastic-modulus and nano-hardness were calculated and collagen content was determined using hydroxyproline-assay. Micro-Raman were performed. TEM was carried out to study structural variations of dentine-collagen in artificial-saliva (collagenase). Data were presented as mean±standard deviation and analyzed by SPSS v.15, by analysis of variance.

    RESULTS: Synergetic effect of VE-TPGS was observed with RF through higher structural integrity of dentine collagen-fibrils shown by TEM/AFM. Superior surface/bulk mechanical stability was shown by nano-indentation/mechanical testing. Improvement in collagenase degradation resistance for hydroxyproline release was observed and lower endogenous-protease release of MMP-2/Cathepsin-K. Raman-analysis analysed chemical interactions between RF and collagen confirming structural-integrity of collagen fibrils after crosslinking. After 24h mineralization, AFM showed mineral depositions in close association with dentine-collagen fibrils with RF/VE-TPGS formulations.

    SIGNIFICANCE: Potential synergetic effect of RF/VE-TPGS was observed by reflection of higher structural integrity and conformational-stability of dentine-collagen fibrils.

  4. Fawzy AS, Daood U, Matinlinna JP
    Dent Mater, 2019 07;35(7):979-989.
    PMID: 31003759 DOI: 10.1016/j.dental.2019.04.001
    OBJECTIVE: This study introduced the potential and proof-of-concept of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) technology for dentin-surface treatment for resin-dentin bonding without acid-aided demineralization. This new strategy could provide a way to enhance interface-integrity and bond-durability by changing the nature of dentin-substrate; bonded-interface structure and properties; and minimizing denuded-collagen exposure.

    METHODS: The interaction between HIFU waves and dentin-surface in terms of structural, mechanical and chemical variations were investigated by SEM, TEM, AFM, nano-indentation and Raman-analysis. The bonding between HIFU-treated dentin and two-step, etch-and-rinse, adhesive was preliminary explored by characterizing dentin-bound proteases activities, resin-dentin interfacial morphology and bond-durability with HIFU exposure at different time-points of 60, 90 and 120 s compared to conventional acid-etching technique.

    RESULTS: With the increase in HIFU exposure-time from 60-to-120 s, HIFU waves were able to remove the smear-layer, expose dentinal-tubules and creating textured/rough dentin surface. In addition, dentin surfaces showed a pattern of interlocking ribbon-like minerals-coated collagen-fibrils protruding from the underlaying amorphous dentin-background with HIFU exposure for 90 s and 120 s. This characteristic pattern of dentin-surface showing inorganic-minerals associated/aligned with collagen-fibrils, with 90-to-120 s HIFU-treatment, was confirmed by the Raman-analysis. HIFU-treated specimens showed higher nano-indentation properties and lower concentrations of active MMP-2 and Cathepsin-K compared to the acid-etched specimens. The resin-dentin bonded interface revealed the partial/complete absence of the characteristic hybrid-layer formed with conventional etch-and-rinse bonding strategy. Additionally, resin-infiltration and resin-tags formation were enhanced with the increase in HIFU exposure-time to 120 s. Although, all groups showed significant decrease in bond-strength after 12 months compared to 24 h storage in artificial saliva, groups exposed to HIFU for 90 s and 120 s showed significantly higher μTBS compared to the control acid-etched group.

    SIGNIFICANCE: The implementation of HIFU-technology for dental hard-tissues treatment could be of potential significance in adhesive/restorative dentistry owing to its ability of controlled, selective and localised combined tissue alteration/ablation effects.

  5. Daood U, Akram Z, Matinlinna JP, Fawzy AS
    Dent Mater, 2019 07;35(7):1017-1030.
    PMID: 31064669 DOI: 10.1016/j.dental.2019.04.005
    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate EDC-assisted collagen crosslinking effect with different concentrations of tiopronin-protected gold (TPAu) nanoparticles on demineralized dentine.

    METHODS: TPAu nanoparticles were fabricated from 0.31-g tetrachloroauric acid and 0.38-g of N-(2-mercaptopropionyl) glycine (2.4-mmol). Then co-dissolved using 35-mL of 6:1 methanol/acetic acid and mixed using NaBH4. EDC (0.3-M) was conjugated to TPAu nanoparticles at TPAU/EDC-0.25:1, and TPAU/EDC-0.5:1 treatment formulations ratios. Dentin specimens treated with 0.3-M EDC solution alone or left untreated were used as control. Nanoparticles formulations were characterized in term of particles morphology and size, Zeta potential, thermogravimetric analysis and small-angle X-ray scattering. Dentin substrates were characterized in term of TEM investigation, dentin proteases characterization, hydroxyproline liberation, elastic modulus measurement, Raman analysis and confocal microscopy viewing.

    RESULTS: TEM evaluation of tiopronin protected gold nanoparticles dispersion revealed nano-clusters formations in both groups. However, based on our TEM measurements, the particle-size was ranging from ˜20 to 50 nm with spherical core-shape which were almost similar for both TPAu/EDC ratios (0.5:1 and 0.25:1). Zeta potential measurements indicate negative nanoparticles surface charge. SAXS profiles for both formulations, suggest a typical profile for uni-lamellar nanoparticles. Superior dentin collagen cross-linking effect was found with the TPAu/EDC nanoparticles formulations compared to the control and EDC treated groups.

    SIGNIFICANCE: Cross-linking of dentin collagen using TPAu coupled with EDC through TPAu/EDC nanoparticles formulations is of potential significance in improving the biodegradation resistance, proteases inhibition, mechanical and structural stability of demineralized dentin substrates. In addition, the cross-linking effect is dependent on TPAu/EDC ratio, whereas higher cross-linking effect was found at TPAu/EDC ratio of 0.5:1.

  6. Qasim SSB, Nogueria LP, Fawzy AS, Daood U
    AAPS PharmSciTech, 2020 Jun 16;21(5):173.
    PMID: 32548717 DOI: 10.1208/s12249-020-01708-x
    Innovative strategies for periodontal regeneration have been the focus of research clusters across the globe for decades. In order to overcome the drawbacks of currently available options, investigators have suggested a novel concept of functionally graded membrane (FGM) templates with different structural and morphological gradients. Chitosan (CH) has been used in the past for similar purpose. However, the composite formulation of composite and tetracycline when cross-linked with glutaraldehyde have received little attention. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to investigate the drug loading and release characteristics of novel freeze gelated chitosan templates at different percentages of glutaraldehyde. These were cross-linked with 0.1 and 1% glutaraldehyde and loaded with doxycycline hyclate. The electron micrographs depicted porous morphology of neat templates. After cross-linking, these templates showed compressed ultrastructures. Computerized tomography analysis showed that the templates had 88 to 92% porosity with average pore diameter decreased from 78 to 44.9 μm with increasing concentration. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed alterations in the glycosidic segment of chitosan fingerprint region which after drug loading showed a dominant doxycycline spectral composite profile. Interestingly, swelling profile was not affected by cross-linking either at 0.1 and 1% glutaraldehyde and template showed a swelling ratio of 80%, which gained equilibrium after 15 min. The drug release pattern also showed a 40 μg/mL of release after 24 h. These doxycycline-loaded templates show their tendency to be used in a functionally graded membrane facing the defect site.
  7. Qasim SSB, Nogueira LP, Fawzy AS, Daood U
    AAPS PharmSciTech, 2020 Sep 01;21(7):250.
    PMID: 32875436 DOI: 10.1208/s12249-020-01778-x
    The correct spelling of the second author's name is Liebert Parreiras Nogueira.
  8. Akram Z, Daood U, Aati S, Ngo H, Fawzy AS
    Mater Sci Eng C Mater Biol Appl, 2021 Mar;122:111894.
    PMID: 33641897 DOI: 10.1016/j.msec.2021.111894
    We formulated a pH-sensitive chlorhexidine-loaded mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) modified with poly-(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (CHX-loaded/MSN-PLGA) and incorporated into experimental resin-based dentin adhesives at 5 and 10 wt%. Nanocarriers were characterized in terms of morphology, physicochemical features, spectral analyses, drug-release kinetics at varying pH and its effect on dentin-bound proteases was investigated. The modified dentin adhesives were characterized for cytotoxicity, antimicrobial activity, degree of conversion (DC) along with CHX release, micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS) and nano-leakage expression were studied at different pH values and storage time. CHX-loaded/MSN-PLGA nanocarriers exhibited a significant pH-dependent drug release behavior than CHX-loaded/MSN nanocarriers without PLGA modification. The highest percentage of CHX release was seen with 10 wt% CHX-loaded/MSN-PLGA doped adhesive at a pH of 5.0. CHX-loaded/MSN-PLGA modified adhesives exhibited more profound antibiofilm characteristics against S. mutans and more sustained CHX-release which was pH dependent. After 6 months in artificial saliva at varying pH, the 5 wt% CHX-loaded/MSN-PLGA doped adhesive showed excellent bonding under SEM/TEM, higher μTBS, and least nano-leakage expression. The pH-sensitive CHX-loaded/MSN-PLGA could be of crucial advantage for resin-dentin bonding applications especially in reduced pH microenvironment resulting from biofilm formation; and the activation of dentin-bound proteases as a consequence of acid etching and acidic content of bonding resin monomers.
  9. Daood U, Tsoi JKH, Neelakantan P, Matinlinna JP, Omar HAK, Al-Nabulsi M, et al.
    Dent Mater, 2018 08;34(8):1175-1187.
    PMID: 29779627 DOI: 10.1016/j.dental.2018.05.005
    OBJECTIVE: Collagen fibrils aid in anchoring resin composite restorations to the dentine substrate. The aim of the study was to investigate effect of non-enzymatic glycation on bond strength and durability of demineralized dentine specimens in a modified two-step etch-and-rinse dentine adhesive.

    METHODS: Dentine surfaces were etched with 37% phosphoric acid, bonded with respective in vitro ethanol and acetone adhesives modified with (m/m, 0, 1%, 2% and 3% ribose), restored with restorative composite-resin, and sectioned into resin-dentine slabs and beams to be stored for 24h or 12 months in artificial saliva. Bond-strength testing was performed with bond failure analysis. Pentosidine assay was performed on demineralized ribose modified dentine specimens with HPLC sensitive fluorescent detection. The structural variations of ribose-modified dentine were analysed using TEM and human dental pulpal cells were used for cell viability. Three-point bending test of ribose-modified dentine beams were performed and depth of penetration of adhesives evaluated with micro-Raman spectroscopy. The MMP-2 and cathepsin K activities in ribose-treated dentine powder were also quantified using ELISA. Bond strength data was expressed using two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test. Paired T tests were used to analyse the specimens for pentosidine crosslinks. The modulus of elasticity and dentinal MMP-2 and cathepsin K concentrations was separately analyzed using one-way ANOVA.

    RESULTS: The incorporation of RB in the experimental two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive at 1% improved the adhesive bond strength without adversely affecting the degree of polymerisation. The newly developed adhesive increases the resistance of dentine collagen to degradation by inhibiting endogenous matrix metalloproteinases and cysteine cathepsins. The application of RB to acid-etched dentine helps maintain the mechanical properties.

    SIGNIFICANCE: The incorporation of 1%RB can be considered as a potential candidate stabilizing resin dentine bond.

  10. Daood U, Sauro S, Pichika MR, Omar H, Liang Lin S, Fawzy AS
    Dent Mater, 2020 01;36(1):145-156.
    PMID: 31818524 DOI: 10.1016/j.dental.2019.11.003
    OBJECTIVE: To modify a universal dentine adhesive with different concentrations of riboflavin and D-Alpha 1000 Succinate polyethylene (VE-TPGS) as a chemical enhancer and to assess the micro-tensile bond strength (24h/12 months), determine resin penetration, measurement of intermolecular interactions and cytotoxicity.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: An experimental adhesive system based on bis-GMA, HEMA and hydrophobic monomer was doped with RF0.125 (RF - Riboflavin) or RF/VE-TPGS (0.25/0.50) and submitted to μTBS evaluation. Resin dentine slabs were prepared and examined using SEM and TEM. Adhesion force was analysed on ends of AFM cantilevers deflection. Quenched peptide assays were performed using fluorescence scanner and wavelengths set to 320nm and 405nm. Cytotoxicity was assessed using human peripheral blood mononuclear cell line. Molecular docking studies were carried out using Schrödinger small-molecule drug discovery suite 2018-2. Data from viable cell results was analyzed using one-way ANOVA. Bond strength values were analysed by two-way ANOVA. Nonparametric results were analyzed using a Kruskal-Wallis test at a 0.05 significance level.

    RESULTS: RF/VE-TPGS0.25 groups showed highest bond strength results after 24-h storage in artificial saliva (p<0.05). RF/VE-TPGS0.50 groups showed increased bond strength after 12-months of ageing. RF/VE-TPGS modified adhesives showed appreciable presence of a hybrid layer. Packing fraction indicated solid angle profiles describing well sized density and topology relations for the RF/VE-TPGS adhesives, in particular with the RF/VE-TPGS0.50 specimens. Qualitative analysis of the phenotype of macrophages was prominently CD163+ in the RF/VE-TPGS0.50. Both the compounds showed favourable negative binding energies as expressed in terms of 'XP GScore'.

    CONCLUSION: New formulations based on the incorporation of RF/VE-TPGS in universal adhesives may be of significant potential in facilitating penetration, distribution and uptake of riboflavin within the dentine surface.

  11. Daood U, Parolia A, Elkezza A, Yiu CK, Abbott P, Matinlinna JP, et al.
    Dent Mater, 2019 09;35(9):1264-1278.
    PMID: 31201019 DOI: 10.1016/j.dental.2019.05.020
    OBJECTIVE: To analyze effect of NaOCl+2% quaternary ammonium silane (QAS)-containing novel irrigant against bacteria impregnated inside the root canal system, and to evaluate its antimicrobial and mechanical potential of dentine substrate.

    METHODS: Root canal was prepared using stainless steel K-files™ and ProTaper™ and subjected to manual and ultrasonic irrigation using 6% NaOCl+2% CHX, 6% NaOCl+2% QAS and saline as control. For confocal-microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and SEM analysis before and after treatment, Enterococcus faecalis cultured for 7 days. Raman spectroscopy analysis was done across cut section of gutta percha/sealer-dentine to detect resin infiltration. Indentation of mechanical properties was evaluated using a Berkovich indenter. The contact angle of irrigants and surface free energy were evaluated. Mineralization nodules were detected through Alazarin red after 14 days.

    RESULTS: Control biofilms showed dense green colonies. Majority of E. faecalis bacteria were present in biofilm fluoresced red in NaOCl+2% QAS group. There was reduction of 484cm-1 Raman band and its intensity reached lowest with NaOCl+2% QAS. There was an increase in 1350-1420cm-1 intensity in the NaOCl+2% CHX groups. Gradual decrease in 1639cm-1 and 1609cm-1 Raman signal ratios were seen in the resin-depth region of 17μm>, 14.1μm> and 13.2μm for NaOCl+2% QAS, NaOCl+2% CHX and control groups respectively. All obturated groups showed an intact sealer/dentine interface with a few notable differences. 0.771 and 83.5% creep indentation distance for NaOCl+2% QAS ultrasonic groups were observed. Highest proportion of polar component was significantly found in the NaOCl+2% QAS groups which was significantly higher as compared to other groups. Mineralized nodules were increased in NaOCl+2% QAS.

    SIGNIFICANCE: Favorable antimicrobial and endodontic profile of the NaOCl+2% QAS solution might suggest clinical use for it for more predictable reduction of intracanal bacteria.

  12. Fu C, Deng S, Koneski I, Awad MM, Akram Z, Matinlinna J, et al.
    J Mech Behav Biomed Mater, 2020 12;112:104082.
    PMID: 32979607 DOI: 10.1016/j.jmbbm.2020.104082
    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of blue light photoactivated riboflavin modified universal adhesives on dentin collagen biodegradation resistance, dentin apparent elastic modulus, and resin-dentin bond strength with interfacial morphology.

    METHODS: Dentin slabs were treated with 0.1% riboflavin-5-phosphate modified (powder added slowly while shaking and then sonicated to enhance the dispersion process) Universal Adhesive Scotch Bond and Zipbond™ along with control (non-modified) and experimental adhesives, photoactivated with blue light for 20s. Hydroxyproline (HYP) release was assessed after 1-week storage. Elastic-modulus testing was evaluated using universal testing machine at 24 h. Resin-dentin interfacial morphology was assessed with scanning electron-microscope, after 6-month storage. 0.1% rhodamine dye was added into each adhesive and analyzed using CLSM. Detection of free amino groups was carried out using ninhydrin and considered directly proportional to optical absorbance. Collagen molecular confirmation was determined using spectropolarimeter to evaluate and assess CD spectra. For molecular docking studies with riboflavin (PDB ID file), the binding pocket was selected with larger SiteScore and DScore using Schrodinger PB software. After curing, Raman shifts in Amide regions were obtained at 8 μm levels. Data were analyzed using Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, p ≤ 0.05) and Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison post hoc tests.

    RESULTS: At baseline, bond strength reduced significantly (p ≤ 0.05) in control specimens. However, at 6 months' storage, UVA Zipbond™ had significantly higher μTBS. Resin was able to diffuse through the porous demineralized dentin creating adequate hybrid layers in both 0.1%RF modified adhesives in CLSM images. In riboflavin groups, hybrid layer and resin tags were more pronounced. The circular dichroism spectrum showed negative peaks for riboflavin adhesive specimens. Best fitted poses adopted by riboflavin compound are docked with MMP-2 and -9 proteases. Amide bands and CH2 peaks followed the trend of being lowest for control UA Scotch bond adhesive specimens and increasing in Amides, proline, and CH2 intensities in 0.1%RF modified adhesive specimens. All 0.1%RF application groups showed statistically significant (p 

  13. Daood U, Aati S, Akram Z, Yee J, Yong C, Parolia A, et al.
    Biomater Sci, 2021 Jul 27;9(15):5344-5358.
    PMID: 34190236 DOI: 10.1039/d1bm00555c
    The aim of this study was to characterize multiscale interactions between high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and dentin collagen and associated matrix-metalloproteinases, in addition to the analysis of the effect of HIFU on bacterial biofilms and biological properties. Dentin specimens were subjected to 5, 10 or 20 s HIFU. XPS spectra were acquired and TEM was performed on dentin slabs. Collagen orientation was performed using Raman spectroscopy. Calcium measurements in human dental pulpal cells (hDPCs) were carried out after 7 and 14 days. For macrophages, CD36+ and CD163+ were analysed. Biofilms were analyzed using CLSM. Tandem mass spectroscopy was performed for the detection of hydroxyproline sequences along with human MMP-2 quantification. Phosphorus, calcium, and nitrogen were detected in HIFU specimens. TEM images demonstrated the collagen network appearing to be fused together in the HIFU 10 and 20 s specimens. The band associated with 960 cm-1 corresponds to the stretching ν1 PO43-. The control specimens showed intensive calcium staining followed by HIFU 20 s > HIFU 10 s > HIFU 5 s specimens. Macrophages in the HIFU specimens co-expressed CD80+ and CD163+ cells. CLSM images showed the HIFU treatment inhibiting bacterial growth. SiteScore propensity determined the effect of HIFU on the binding site with a higher DScore representing better site exposure on MMPs. Multiscale mapping of dentin collagen after HIFU treatment showed no deleterious alterations on the organic structure of dentin.
  14. Daood U, Matinlinna JP, Pichika MR, Mak KK, Nagendrababu V, Fawzy AS
    Sci Rep, 2020 07 03;10(1):10970.
    PMID: 32620785 DOI: 10.1038/s41598-020-67616-z
    To study the antimicrobial effects of quaternary ammonium silane (QAS) exposure on Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus bacterial biofilms at different concentrations. Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus biofilms were cultured on dentine disks, and incubated for bacterial adhesion for 3-days. Disks were treated with disinfectant (experimental QAS or control) and returned to culture for four days. Small-molecule drug discovery-suite was used to analyze QAS/Sortase-A active site. Cleavage of a synthetic fluorescent peptide substrate, was used to analyze inhibition of Sortase-A. Raman spectroscopy was performed and biofilms stained for confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Dentine disks that contained treated dual-species biofilms were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Analysis of DAPI within biofilms was performed using CLSM. Fatty acids in bacterial membranes were assessed with succinic-dehydrogenase assay along with time-kill assay. Sortase-A protein underwent conformational change due to QAS molecule during simulation, showing fluctuating alpha and beta strands. Spectroscopy revealed low carbohydrate intensities in 1% and 2% QAS. SEM images demonstrated absence of bacterial colonies after treatment. DAPI staining decreased with 1% QAS (p 
  15. Parolia A, Kumar H, Ramamurthy S, Madheswaran T, Davamani F, Pichika MR, et al.
    Molecules, 2021 Jan 30;26(3).
    PMID: 33573147 DOI: 10.3390/molecules26030715
    To determine the antibacterial effect of propolis nanoparticles (PNs) as an endodontic irrigant against Enterococcus faecalis biofilm inside the endodontic root canal system. Two-hundred-ten extracted human teeth were sectioned to obtain 6 mm of the middle third of the root. The root canal was enlarged to an internal diameter of 0.9 mm. The specimens were inoculated with E. faecalis for 21 days. Following this, specimens were randomly divided into seven groups, with 30 dentinal blocks in each group including: group I-saline; group II-propolis 100 µg/mL; group III-propolis 300 µg/mL; group IV-propolis nanoparticle 100 µg/mL; group V-propolis nanoparticle 300µg/mL; group VI-6% sodium hypochlorite; group VII-2% chlorhexidine. Dentin shavings were collected at 200 and 400 μm depths, and total numbers of CFUs were determined at the end of one, five, and ten minutes. The non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were used to compare the differences in reduction in CFUs between all groups, and probability values of p < 0.05 were set as the reference for statistically significant results. The antibacterial effect of PNs as an endodontic irrigant was also assessed against E. faecalis isolates from patients with failed root canal treatment. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) were also performed after exposure to PNs. A Raman spectroscope, equipped with a Leica microscope and lenses with curve-fitting Raman software, was used for analysis. The molecular interactions between bioactive compounds of propolis (Pinocembrin, Kaempferol, and Quercetin) and the proteins Sortase A and β-galactosidase were also understood by computational molecular docking studies. PN300 was significantly more effective in reducing CFUs compared to all other groups (p < 0.05) except 6% NaOCl and 2% CHX (p > 0.05) at all time intervals and both depths. At five minutes, 6% NaOCl and 2% CHX were the most effective in reducing CFUs (p < 0.05). However, no significant difference was found between PN300, 6% NaOCl, and 2% CHX at 10 min (p > 0.05). SEM images also showed the maximum reduction in E. faecalis with PN300, 6% NaOCl, and 2% CHX at five and ten minutes. CLSM images showed the number of dead cells in dentin were highest with PN300 compared to PN100 and saline. There was a reduction in the 484 cm-1 band and an increase in the 870 cm-1 band in the PN300 group. The detailed observations of the docking poses of bioactive compounds and their interactions with key residues of the binding site in all the three docking protocols revealed that the interactions were consistent with reasonable docking and IFD docking scores. PN300 was equally as effective as 6% NaOCl and 2% CHX in reducing the E. faecalis biofilms.
  16. Daood U, Omar H, Qasim S, Nogueira LP, Pichika MR, Mak KK, et al.
    J Mech Behav Biomed Mater, 2020 10;110:103927.
    PMID: 32957222 DOI: 10.1016/j.jmbbm.2020.103927
    OBJECTIVE: Here we describe a novel formulation, based on quaternary ammonium (QA) and riboflavin (RF), which combines antimicrobial activities and protease inhibitory properties with collagen crosslinking without interference to bonding capabilities, was investigated.

    METHODS: Experimental adhesives modified with different fractions of dioctadecyldimethyl ammonium bromide quaternary ammonium and riboflavin (QARF) were formulated. Dentine specimens were bonded to resincomposites with control or the experimental adhesives to be evaluated for bond strength, interfacial morphology, micro-Raman analysis, nano-CT and nano-leakage expression. In addition, the antibacterial and biocompatibilities of the experimental adhesives were investigated. The endogenous proteases activities and their molecular binding-sites were studied.

    RESULTS: Modifying the experimental adhesives with QARF did not adversely affect micro-tensile bond strength or the degree of conversion along with the demonstration of anti-proteases and antibacterial abilities with acceptable biocompatibilities. In general, all experimental adhesives demonstrated favourable bond strength with increased and improved values in 1% QARF adhesive at 24 h (39.2 ± 3.0 MPa) and following thermocycling (34.8 ± 4.3 MPa).

    SIGNIFICANCE: It is possible to conclude that the use of QARF with defined concentration can maintain bond strength values when an appropriate protocol is used and have contributed in ensuring a significant decrease in microbial growth of biofilms. Incorporation of 1% QARF in the experimental adhesive lead to simultaneous antimicrobial and anti-proteolytic effects with low cytotoxic effects, acceptable bond strength and interfacial morphology.

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