Displaying all 11 publications

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  1. WILLIS GC, SIANG SC
    Med J Malaya, 1960 Mar;14:166-76.
    PMID: 13785569
    Matched MeSH terms: Liver Neoplasms/therapy*
  2. Adeshina AM, Hashim R, Khalid NE
    Interdiscip Sci, 2014 Sep;6(3):222-34.
    PMID: 25205500 DOI: 10.1007/s12539-013-0204-7
    Hepatocellular Carcinoma is the most common type of liver cancer having a strong relation with cirrhosis. Undoubtedly, cirrhosis may be caused by the virus infection of hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis C (HBC) or through alchoholism. However, even when cirrhosis has not been developed, patients with hepatitis viral infections are still at the risk of liver cancer. Apparently, among the numerous medical imaging techniques, Computed Tomography (CT) is the best in defining liver tumor borders. Unfortunately, these imaging techniques, including the CT procedures, usually rely on an appended application to reconstruct the generated 2-D slices to 3-D model. This may involve high performance computation, may be time-consuming or costly. Moreover, even with the outstanding performances of CT in defining the liver tumor boundaries, contrast between tumor tissues and the surrounding liver parenchyma is too low in CT slices. With such a close proxity in the tumor and the surrounding liver tissues, accurate characterization of liver tumor is a challenge. Previously, algorithms were developed to reveal abnormalities in brain's MRI datasets and CT abdominal pelvic, however, introducing a framework that could accurately characterize liver tumor and its surrounding tissues in CT datasets would go a long way in contributing to medical diagnosis and therapy planning of Hepatocellular Carcinoma. This paper proposes an Hepatocellular Carcinoma framework by extending the functionalities of SurLens Visualization System with an automatic liver tumor localization technique using Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA). The study was evaluated with liver CT datasets from the Imaging Science and Information Systems (ISIS) Center, the Georgetown University Medical Center. Significantly, visualization of liver CT datasets and the localization of the entangled tumor was achieved without prior datasets segmentation. Interestingly, the framework achieved remarkably good processing speed at a reasonably cheaper cost with an immediate reconstruction of the datasets and mapping of the tumor tissues within the surrounding liver parenchyma.
    Matched MeSH terms: Liver Neoplasms/therapy
  3. Hashikin NA, Yeong CH, Abdullah BJ, Ng KH, Chung LY, Dahalan R, et al.
    PLoS One, 2015;10(9):e0138106.
    PMID: 26382059 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0138106
    Samarium-153 (153Sm) styrene divinylbenzene microparticles were developed as a surrogate for Yttrium-90 (90Y) microspheres in liver radioembolization therapy. Unlike the pure beta emitter 90Y, 153Sm possess both therapeutic beta and diagnostic gamma radiations, making it possible for post-procedure imaging following therapy.
    Matched MeSH terms: Liver Neoplasms/therapy*
  4. Sharifah NA, Muhaizan WM, Rahman J, Zulfikar A, Zahari Z
    Malays J Pathol, 1999 Dec;21(2):105-9.
    PMID: 11068415
    The cytological features of a rare case of undifferentiated (embryonal) sarcoma of the liver are presented. The cytology smears showed singly dispersed polygonal and spindle cells as well as loose clusters of cells held together in myxoid material. Neoplastic cells were generally large with round, oval or lobulated nuclei. The cytoplasm was variable in amount with ill-defined borders. Occasional multinucleated cells were also present. Hyaline globules were present on sections of the cell block. Immunohistochemical studies performed showed positivity for vimentin, cytokeratin and alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) in the tumour cells.
    Matched MeSH terms: Liver Neoplasms/therapy
  5. Ramanujam TM, Ramesh JC, Goh DW, Wong KT, Ariffin WA, Kumar G, et al.
    J Pediatr Surg, 1999 Nov;34(11):1684-6.
    PMID: 10591570
    Here the first case in the literature of both mesenchymal hamartoma and malignant mesenchymoma occurring in a 6-year-old male child, at different times and at different sites in the liver, and also the possible malignant transformation of a mesenchymal hamartoma is reported. The tumor developed from a lesion in the right lobe that was overlooked initially during a left lateral segmentectomy at 18 months of age for a mesenchymal hamartoma. Malignant mesenchymoma is a rare and aggressive tumor. The origin of this tumor is not well understood. There has been no direct support to the hypothesis that malignant mesenchymoma may be the malignant counterpart of mesenchymal hamartoma. The authors provide clinical and histopathologic evidence in our case that suggests the possibility of malignant mesenchymoma arising from a mesenchymal hamartoma. This case emphasizes the need for complete removal of mesenchymal hamartoma and the need for long-term follow-up to detect multifocal lesion or malignant transformation.
    Matched MeSH terms: Liver Neoplasms/therapy
  6. Balasegaram M
    Am. J. Surg., 1975 Jul;130(1):33-7.
    PMID: 50750
    A review of 352 patients with primary liver cell carcinoma treated by the author is presented. The poor rate of resectability (7 per cent) has necessitated various forms of treatment over the years. These are described in detail. Based on this experience, the current form of treatment for nonresectable carcinoma is summarized. Although it is too early to assess this form of treatment, initial results appear to be promising. A second report in the near future is planned.
    Matched MeSH terms: Liver Neoplasms/therapy*
  7. Rahman FA, Naidu J, Ngiu CS, Yaakob Y, Mohamed Z, Othman H, et al.
    Asian Pac J Cancer Prev, 2016;17(8):4037-41.
    PMID: 27644658
    BACKGROUND: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common cancer that is frequently diagnosed at an advanced stage. Transarterial chemoembolisation (TACE) is an effective palliative treatment for patients who are not eligible for curative treatment. The two main methods for performing TACE are conventional (c-TACE) or with drug eluting beads (DEB-TACE). We sought to compare survival rates and tumour response between patients undergoing c-TACE and DEB-TACE at our centre.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective cohort study of patients undergoing either treatment was carried out from January 2009 to December 2014. Tumour response to the procedures was evaluated according to the modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (mRECIST). Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to assess and compare the overall survival in the two groups.

    RESULTS: A total of 79 patients were analysed (34 had c-TACE, 45 had DEB-TACE) with a median follow-up of 11.8 months. A total of 20 patients in the c-TACE group (80%) and 12 patients in the DEB-TACE group (44%) died during the follow up period. The median survival durations in the c-TACE and DEB-TACE groups were 4.9 ± 3.2 months and 8.3 ± 2.0 months respectively (p=0.008). There was no statistically significant difference noted among the two groups with respect to mRECIST criteria.

    CONCLUSIONS: DEB-TACE demonstrated a significant improvement in overall survival rates for patients with unresectable HCC when compared to c-TACE. It is a safe and promising approach and should potentially be considered as a standard of care in the management of unresectable HCC.

    Matched MeSH terms: Liver Neoplasms/therapy*
  8. Goh KL, Razlan H, Hartono JL, Qua CS, Yoong BK, Koh PS, et al.
    J Dig Dis, 2015 Mar;16(3):152-8.
    PMID: 25512092 DOI: 10.1111/1751-2980.12223
    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an important cancer in Malaysia. This study aimed to determine the epidemiological characteristics and clinical presentations of patients in a multiracial population consisting of three major Asian races: Malays, Chinese and Indians.
    Matched MeSH terms: Liver Neoplasms/therapy
  9. Qi Qi C, Ajit Singh V
    BMJ Case Rep, 2012;2012.
    PMID: 22892228 DOI: 10.1136/bcr.01.2012.5518
    The authors present an interesting case under our follow-up who has had five different forms of tumours with different pathologies throughout his lifetime. He started off with hepatoma, followed by pleomorphic sarcoma of the thigh, adenocarcinoma of the prostate, meningioma and finally schwanoma. He is still alive to this date.
    Matched MeSH terms: Liver Neoplasms/therapy
  10. Tak WY, Lin SM, Wang Y, Zheng J, Vecchione A, Park SY, et al.
    Clin. Cancer Res., 2018 01 01;24(1):73-83.
    PMID: 29018051 DOI: 10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-16-2433
    Purpose: Lyso-thermosensitive liposomal doxorubicin (LTLD) consists of doxorubicin contained within a heat-sensitive liposome. When heated to ≥40°C, LTLD locally releases a high concentration of doxorubicin. We aimed to determine whether adding LTLD improves the efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) lesions with a maximum diameter (dmax) of 3 to 7 cm.Experimental Design: The HEAT Study was a randomized, double-blind, dummy-controlled trial of RFA ± LTLD. The 701 enrolled patients had to have ≤4 unresectable HCC lesions, at least one of which had a dmax of 3 to 7 cm. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS) and a key secondary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Post hoc subset analyses investigated whether RFA duration was associated with efficacy.Results: The primary endpoint was not met; in intention-to-treat analysis, the PFS HR of RFA + LTLD versus RFA alone was 0.96 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.79-1.18; P = 0.71], and the OS HR ratio was 0.95 (95% CI, 0.76-1.20; P = 0.67). Among 285 patients with a solitary HCC lesion who received ≥45 minutes RFA dwell time, the OS HR was 0.63 (95% CI, 0.41-0.96; P < 0.05) in favor of combination therapy. RFA + LTLD had reversible myelosuppression similar to free doxorubicin.Conclusions: Adding LTLD to RFA was safe but did not increase PFS or OS in the overall study population. However, consistent with LTLD's heat-based mechanism of action, subgroup analysis suggested that RFA + LTLD efficacy is improved when RFA dwell time for a solitary lesion ≥45 minutes. Clin Cancer Res; 24(1); 73-83. ©2017 AACR.
    Matched MeSH terms: Liver Neoplasms/therapy*
  11. Cheng AL, Li J, Vaid AK, Ma BB, Teh C, Ahn JB, et al.
    Clin Colorectal Cancer, 2014 Sep;13(3):145-55.
    PMID: 25209093 DOI: 10.1016/j.clcc.2014.06.004
    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is among the most common cancers worldwide, but marked epidemiological differences exist between Asian and non-Asian populations. Hence, a consensus meeting was held in Hong Kong in December 2012 to develop Asia-specific guidelines for the management of metastatic CRC (mCRC). A multidisciplinary expert panel, consisting of 23 participants from 10 Asian and 2 European countries, discussed current guidelines for colon or rectal cancer and developed recommendations for adapting these guidelines to Asian clinical practice. Participants agreed that mCRC management in Asia largely follows international guidelines, but they proposed a number of recommendations based on regional 'real-world' experience. In general, participants agreed that 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) infusion regimens in doublets can be substituted with UFT (capecitabine, tegafur-uracil) and S1 (tegafur, 5-chloro-2,4-dihydroxypyridine and oxonic acid), and that the monoclonal antibodies cetuximab and panitumumab are recommended for KRAS wild type tumors. For KRAS mutant tumors, bevacizumab is the preferred biological therapy. FOLFOX (folinic acid, 5-FU, and oxaliplatin) is preferred for initial therapy in Asian patients. The management of mCRC is evolving, and it must be emphasized that the recommendations presented here reflect current treatment practices and thus might change as more data become available.
    Matched MeSH terms: Liver Neoplasms/therapy*
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