Displaying publications 1 - 20 of 114 in total

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  1. Cheong WL, Mohan D, Warren N, Reidpath DD
    Mult Scler, 2019 11;25(13):1821-1822.
    PMID: 31517592 DOI: 10.1177/1352458519876697
    Matched MeSH terms: Palliative Care*
  2. Ednin H
    Family Physician, 2001;11:34-34.
    Matched MeSH terms: Palliative Care
  3. Devaraj TP
    Med J Malaysia, 2002 Dec;57(4):384-9.
    PMID: 12733161
    Matched MeSH terms: Palliative Care/organization & administration*
  4. Cheong WL, Reidpath DD
    Lancet Neurol, 2017 11;16(11):868.
    PMID: 29029842 DOI: 10.1016/S1474-4422(17)30321-6
    Matched MeSH terms: Palliative Care*
  5. Seng Beng T, Ting Ting T, Karupiah M, Xin Ni C, Li Li H, Chong Guan N, et al.
    Omega (Westport), 2021 Dec;84(2):512-524.
    PMID: 32019387 DOI: 10.1177/0030222820903221
    Suffering experiences are common phenomena in palliative care. In this study, we aim to explore the different patterns of suffering in palliative care. Adult palliative care patients were recruited from the University of Malaya Medical Centre. Suffering scores were charted 3 times a day for a week. The characteristics of the suffering charts were analyzed using SPSS. The patterns of suffering were analyzed using structural pattern recognition. A total of 53 patients participated. The overall trends of suffering were downward (64%), upward (19%), and stable (17%). Median minimum and maximum suffering scores were 2/10 and 6/10, with an average of 3.6/10. Nine patterns of suffering were recognized from categorizing two key characteristics of suffering (intensity and fluctuation)-named S1 to S9. Understanding the different patterns of suffering may lead to better suffering management.
    Matched MeSH terms: Palliative Care*
  6. Lim MA, Ang BT, Lam CL, Loh EC, Zainuddin SI, Capelle DP, et al.
    Eur J Cancer Care (Engl), 2021 Sep;30(5):e13456.
    PMID: 33913192 DOI: 10.1111/ecc.13456
    OBJECTIVE: Suffering is a common experience in palliative care. In our study, we aimed to determine the effect of 5-min mindfulness of love on suffering and the spiritual quality of life of palliative care patients.

    METHODS: We conducted a parallel-group, blinded, randomized controlled study at the University of Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC), Malaysia from February 2019 to April 2019. Sixty adult palliative care patients with an overall suffering score of 4/10 or above based on the Suffering Pictogram were recruited and randomly assigned to either the 5-min mindfulness of love group (N = 30) or the 5-min supportive listening group (N = 30).

    RESULTS: There were statistically significant improvements in the overall suffering score (mean difference = -2.9, CI = -3.7 to -2.1, t = -7.268, p = 0.000) and the total FACIT-Sp-12 score (mean difference = 2.9, CI = 1.5 to 4.3, t = 4.124, p = 0.000) in the intervention group compared to the control group.

    CONCLUSION: The results provided evidence that 5-min mindfulness of love could affect the actual state of suffering and the spiritual quality of life of palliative care patients.

    Matched MeSH terms: Palliative Care; Hospice and Palliative Care Nursing*
  7. Krakauer EL, Kwete X, Kane K, Afshan G, Bazzett-Matabele L, Bien-Aimé DDR, et al.
    JCO Glob Oncol, 2021 06;7:862-872.
    PMID: 34115522 DOI: 10.1200/GO.21.00025
    PURPOSE: To enable design of optimum palliative care for women with cervical cancer, we studied the most common types of suffering and their severity, prevalence, and duration.

    METHODS: We first reviewed the literature on the major types, severity, prevalence, and duration of suffering associated with cervical cancer. We then conducted a modified Delphi process with experts in cervical cancer care to supplement the literature. For each type of suffering, we distinguished between decedents (those who die from cervical cancer in a given year) and nondecedents (those who have cervical cancer in a given year but do not die). By applying the suffering prevalence and duration estimates to the number of decedents, nondecedents, and family caregivers in 2017, we were able to estimate their palliative care needs and the intensity of palliative care needed to respond adequately to this suffering.

    RESULTS: There is a high prevalence among decedents of moderate or severe pain (84%), vaginal discharge (66%), vaginal bleeding (61%), and loss of faith (31%). Among both decedents and nondecedents, there is a high prevalence of clinically significant anxiety (63% and 50%, respectively), depressed mood (52% and 38%, respectively), and sexual dysfunction (87% and 83%, respectively). Moderate or severe financial distress is prevalent among decedents, nondecedents, and family caregivers (84%, 74%, and 66%, respectively). More than 40% of decedents and nondecedents are abandoned by their intimate partners. Most patients experience some combination of moderate or severe physical, psychological, social, and spiritual suffering. In total, 258,649 decedents and 2,558,857 nondecedents needed palliative care in 2017, approximately 85% of whom were in low- and middle-income countries where palliative care is rarely accessible.

    CONCLUSION: Among women with advanced cervical cancer, suffering is highly prevalent and often severe and multifaceted.

    Matched MeSH terms: Palliative Care; Hospice and Palliative Care Nursing*
  8. Krakauer EL, Kane K, Kwete X, Afshan G, Bazzett-Matabele L, Ruthnie Bien-Aimé DD, et al.
    JCO Glob Oncol, 2021 06;7:873-885.
    PMID: 34115527 DOI: 10.1200/GO.21.00026
    Women with cervical cancer, especially those with advanced disease, appear to experience suffering that is more prevalent, complex, and severe than that caused by other cancers and serious illnesses, and approximately 85% live in low- and middle-income countries where palliative care is rarely accessible. To respond to the highly prevalent and extreme suffering in this vulnerable population, we convened a group of experienced experts in all aspects of care for women with cervical cancer, and from countries of all income levels, to create an essential package of palliative care for cervical cancer (EPPCCC). The EPPCCC consists of a set of interventions, medicines, simple equipment, social supports, and human resources, and is designed to be safe and effective for preventing and relieving all types of suffering associated with cervical cancer. It includes only inexpensive and readily available medicines and equipment, and its use requires only basic training. Thus, the EPPCCC can and should be made accessible everywhere, including for the rural poor. We provide guidance for integrating the EPPCCC into gynecologic and oncologic care at all levels of health care systems, and into primary care, in countries of all income levels.
    Matched MeSH terms: Palliative Care; Hospice and Palliative Care Nursing*
  9. Krakauer EL, Kane K, Kwete X, Afshan G, Bazzett-Matabele L, Ruthnie Bien-Aimé DD, et al.
    JCO Glob Oncol, 2021 06;7:886-895.
    PMID: 34115537 DOI: 10.1200/GO.21.00027
    The essential package of palliative care for cervical cancer (EPPCCC), described elsewhere, is designed to be safe and effective for preventing and relieving most suffering associated with cervical cancer and universally accessible. However, it appears that women with cervical cancer, more frequently than patients with other cancers, experience various types of suffering that are refractory to basic palliative care such as what can be provided with the EPPCCC. In particular, relief of refractory pain, vomiting because of bowel obstruction, bleeding, and psychosocial suffering may require additional expertise, medicines, or equipment. Therefore, we convened a group of experienced experts in all aspects of care for women with cervical cancer, and from countries of all income levels, to create an augmented package of palliative care for cervical cancer with which even suffering refractory to the EPPCCC often can be relieved. The package consists of medicines, radiotherapy, surgical procedures, and psycho-oncologic therapies that require advanced or specialized training. Each item in this package should be made accessible whenever the necessary resources and expertise are available.
    Matched MeSH terms: Palliative Care; Hospice and Palliative Care Nursing*
  10. Look ML, Tan SB, Hong LL, Ng CG, Yee HA, Lim LY, et al.
    BMJ Support Palliat Care, 2021 Dec;11(4):433-439.
    PMID: 32788274 DOI: 10.1136/bmjspcare-2020-002382
    CONTEXT: There has been increasing evidence of the role of mindfulness-based interventions in improving various health conditions. However, the evidence for the use of mindfulness in the palliative care setting is still lacking.

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of our study was to determine the efficacy of a single session of 20 min mindful breathing in alleviating multiple symptoms in palliative care.

    METHODS: Adult palliative care in patients with at least one symptom scoring ≥5/10 based on the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS) were recruited from September 2018 to December 2018. Recruited patients were randomly assigned to either 20 min mindful breathing and standard care or standard care alone.

    RESULTS: Forty patients were randomly assigned to standard care plus a 20 min mindful breathing session (n=20) or standard care alone (n=20). There was statistically significant reduction of total ESAS score in the mindful breathing group compared with the control group at minute 20 (U=98, n 1 = n 2 = 20, mean rank 1 = 15.4, mean rank 2 = 25.6, median reduction 1 = 6.5, median reduction 2 = 1.5, z=-2.763, r=0.3, p=0.005).

    CONCLUSION: Our results provided evidence that a single session of 20 min mindful breathing was effective in reducing multiple symptoms rapidly for palliative care patients.

    Matched MeSH terms: Palliative Care; Hospice and Palliative Care Nursing*
  11. Loh KY, Kwa SK, Nurjahan MI
    Med Educ, 2006 Nov;40(11):1131-2.
    PMID: 17054631
    Matched MeSH terms: Palliative Care*
  12. Namazi H, Kulish VV, Wong A
    Sci Rep, 2015;5:13583.
    PMID: 26316014 DOI: 10.1038/srep13583
    Cancer is a class of diseases characterized by out-of-control cells' growth which affect DNAs and make them damaged. Many treatment options for cancer exist, with the primary ones including surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, hormonal therapy, targeted therapy and palliative care. Which treatments are used depends on the type, location, and grade of the cancer as well as the person's health and wishes. Chemotherapy is the use of medication (chemicals) to treat disease. More specifically, chemotherapy typically refers to the destruction of cancer cells. Considering the diffusion of drugs in cancer cells and fractality of DNA walks, in this research we worked on modelling and prediction of the effect of chemotherapy on cancer cells using Fractional Diffusion Equation (FDE). The employed methodology is useful not only for analysis of the effect of special drug and cancer considered in this research but can be expanded in case of different drugs and cancers.
    Matched MeSH terms: Palliative Care; Hospice and Palliative Care Nursing
  13. Ng CG, Lai KT, Tan SB, Sulaiman AH, Zainal NZ
    J Palliat Med, 2016 09;19(9):917-24.
    PMID: 27110900 DOI: 10.1089/jpm.2016.0046
    BACKGROUND: Palliative cancer patients suffer from high levels of distress. There are physiological changes in relation to the level of perceived distress.

    OBJECTIVE: To study the efficacy of 5 minutes of mindful breathing (MB) for rapid reduction of distress in a palliative setting. Its effect to the physiological changes of the palliative cancer patients was also examined.

    METHODS: This is a randomized controlled trial. Sixty palliative cancer patients were recruited. They were randomly assigned to either 5 minutes of MB or normal listening arms. The changes of perceived distress, blood pressure, pulse rate, breathing rate, galvanic skin response, and skin surface temperature of the patients were measured at baseline, after intervention, and 10 minutes post-intervention.

    RESULTS: There was significant reduction of perceived distress, blood pressure, pulse rate, breathing rate, and galvanic skin response; also, significant increment of skin surface temperature in the 5-minute MB group. The changes in the 5-minute breathing group were significantly higher than the normal listening group.

    CONCLUSION: Five-minute MB is a quick, easy to administer, and effective therapy for rapid reduction of distress in palliative setting. There is a need for future study to establish the long-term efficacy of the therapy.

    Matched MeSH terms: Palliative Care*
  14. Cheong WL, Mohan D, Warren N, Reidpath DD
    J Palliat Med, 2019 May;22(5):545-552.
    PMID: 30570416 DOI: 10.1089/jpm.2018.0447
    Background:
    The state of palliative care research is closely linked to the development of palliative care services in a country or region.
    Objective:
    To systematically review the current state of palliative care research in the Asia Pacific region and analyze its relationship with the performance of each country in the region on the Economist Intelligence Unit's 2015 Quality of Death Index.
    Design:
    Systematic review and bibliographic analysis in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis Protocol 2015 (PRISMA-P).
    Data Sources:
    The PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, SCOPUS, CINAHL, and PsychiNFO databases were searched on February 4, 2018.
    Results:
    One thousand six hundred sixty-seven articles were reviewed. Eighteen out of 32 countries in the region published research. Around 74.15% (1236) of the articles were produced by high-income countries. Research output (articles per 1 m population) was closely linked to country performance on the Economist Intelligence Unit's 2015 Quality of Death Index (adjusted R2= 0.85). Palliative care research in the region is overwhelmingly focused on cancer (80.13% of articles reviewed). The most common themes of research were "palliative care service (24.45%)" and "clinical" (15.38%).
    Conclusions:
    Palliative care research in the region is growing but remains largely centered on the high-income countries, with many low- and middle-income countries having little published research output. Much work is required to drive research in these countries to generate the evidence required for the development of palliative care services. The emphasis on cancer in research also indicates that the needs of patients suffering from noncancer-related diseases may be neglected.
    Matched MeSH terms: Palliative Care/organization & administration*; Palliative Care/statistics & numerical data*; Hospice and Palliative Care Nursing/organization & administration*; Hospice and Palliative Care Nursing/statistics & numerical data*
  15. Zhang MWB, Ho RCM, Ng CG
    Technol Health Care, 2017 Dec 04;25(6):1173-1176.
    PMID: 28946598 DOI: 10.3233/THC-170868
    In psychiatry, mindfulness based intervention has been increasingly popular as a means of psychosocial intervention over the last decade. With the alvanche of technological advances, there has been a myriad of mindfulness based applications. Recent reviews have highlighted how these applications are lacking in functionalities and without demonstrated efficacy. Other reviews have emphasized that there is a need to take into consideration the design of an application, due to placebo effects. It is the aim of this technical note to illustrate how the 5-Minutes Mindfulness application, which is an application designed to provide mindfulness exercises to relieve distress and suffering amongst palliative patients, have been conceptualized. The conceptualized application builds on previous evidence of the efficacy of 5-Minutes Mindfulness demonstrated by pilot and randomized trials. In terms of design, the currently conceptualized application has been designed such that placebo effects could be controlled for.
    Matched MeSH terms: Palliative Care/methods*
  16. Guan NC, Beng TS, Sue-Yin L, Kanagasundram S
    Indian J Palliat Care, 2021 02 17;27(1):83-88.
    PMID: 34035622 DOI: 10.4103/IJPC.IJPC_122_20
    Context: While pain is a common complaint among palliative cancer patients, there is little research looking into nonpharmacological methods for the reduction of pain in the palliative setting.

    Aim: This study aims to study the efficacy of 5-min mindful breathing for rapid reduction of pain in a palliative care setting.

    Methods: This is a sub-analysis of the previous randomized controlled study on distress reduction. Sixty patients were recruited and randomly assigned to either the intervention (5-min mindful breathing) or the control (5-min normal listening) group. Participants reported their pain on a 10-item analog scale at baseline, immediately after intervention and 10 min postintervention. Changes in pain scores were further analyzed.

    Results: Pain scores decreased for both the intervention and control groups. However, the reduction of pain did not reach statistical difference in both groups (P > 0.05).

    Conclusion: Five-minute mindful breathing is a quick and easy to administer therapy but does not have significant effects in terms of pain reduction in palliative settings. Future research and directions are nonetheless suggested and encouraged to look for short-term mindfulness-based therapies on pain reduction for this population.

    Matched MeSH terms: Palliative Care; Hospice and Palliative Care Nursing
  17. Lin CP, Boufkhed S, Kizawa Y, Mori M, Hamzah E, Aggarwal G, et al.
    Am J Hosp Palliat Care, 2021 Jul;38(7):861-868.
    PMID: 33789503 DOI: 10.1177/10499091211002797
    BACKGROUND: Hospice and palliative care services provision for COVID-19 patients is crucial to improve their life quality. There is limited evidence on COVID-19 preparedness of such services in the Asia-Pacific region.

    AIM: To evaluate the preparedness and capacity of hospice and palliative care services in the Asia-Pacific region to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic.

    METHOD: An online cross-sectional survey was developed based on methodology guidance. Asia-Pacific Hospice and Palliative Care Network subscribers (n = 1551) and organizational members (n = 185) were emailed. Descriptive analysis was undertaken.

    RESULTS: Ninety-seven respondents completed the survey. Around half of services were hospital-based (n = 47, 48%), and public-funded (n = 46, 47%). Half of services reported to have confirmed cases (n = 47, 49%) and the majority of the confirmed cases were patients (n = 28, 61%). Staff perceived moderate risk of being infected by COVID-19 (median: 7/10). > 85% of respondents reported they had up-to-date contact list for staff and patients, one-third revealed challenges to keep record of relatives who visited the services (n = 30, 31%), and of patients visited in communities (n = 29, 30%). Majority of services (60%) obtained adequate resources for infection control except face mask. More than half had no guidance on Do Not Resuscitate orders (n = 59, 66%) or on bereavement care for family members (n = 44, 51%).

    CONCLUSION: Recommendations to strengthen the preparedness of palliative care services include: 1) improving the access to face mask; 2) acquiring stress management protocols for staff when unavailable; 3) reinforcing the contact tracing system for relatives and visits in the community and 4) developing guidance on patient and family care during patient's dying trajectory.

    Matched MeSH terms: Palliative Care*
  18. Cheah WL, Ling NC, Chang KH
    Chin Clin Oncol, 2016 Feb;5(1):7.
    PMID: 26932431 DOI: 10.3978/j.issn.2304-3865.2016.02.01
    This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the prevalence of unmet supportive care needs among prostate cancer patients.
    Matched MeSH terms: Palliative Care
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