Displaying publications 1 - 20 of 29 in total

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  1. Goh HF, Philip K
    PLoS ONE, 2015;10(10):e0140434.
    PMID: 26474074 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0140434
    A dramatic increase in bacterial resistance towards currently available antibiotics has raised worldwide concerns for public health. Therefore, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have emerged as a promisingly new group of therapeutic agents for managing infectious diseases. The present investigation focusses on the isolation and purification of a novel bacteriocin from an indigenous sample of cow milk and it's mode of action. The bacteriocin was isolated from Weissella confusa A3 that was isolated from the sample and was shown to have inhibitory activity towards pathogenic bacteria namely Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Micrococcus luteus. The bacteriocin was shown to be heat stable and functioned well at low pH (2 to 6). Reduction of activity was shown after treatment with proteinase K, trypsin and peptidase that confirmed the proteinaceous nature of the compound. MALDI-TOF analysis of the sample gave a mass approximating 2.7 kDa. The membrane of the bacteria was disrupted by the bacteriocin causing SYTOX® green dye to enter the cell and bind to the bacterial DNA giving fluorescence signal. Bacterial cell treated with the bacteriocin also showed significant morphological changes under transmission electron microscope. No virulence and disease related genes can be detected from the genome of the strain.
    Matched MeSH terms: Dairy Products/microbiology*
  2. Bidawid S, Farber JM, Sattar SA, Hayward S
    J. Food Prot., 2000 Apr;63(4):522-8.
    PMID: 10772219
    Experiments were performed to determine the thermal resistance of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in three types of dairy products containing increased amounts of fat content (skim milk, homogenized milk; 3.5% MFG, and table cream; 18% MFG). HAV-inoculated dairy products were introduced into custom-made U-shaped microcapillary tubes that in turn were simultaneously immersed in a waterbath, using custom-made floating boats and a carrying platform. Following exposure to the desired time and temperature combinations, the contents of each of the tubes was retrieved and was tested by plaque assay to determine the reduction in virus titer. Our data indicated that < 0.5 min at 85 degrees C was sufficient to cause a 5-log reduction in HAV titer in all three dairy products, whereas at 80 degrees C, < or = 0.68 min (for skim and homogenized milk), and 1.24 min (for cream) were needed to cause a similar log reduction. Using a nonlinear two-phase negative exponential model (two-compartment model) to analyze the data, it was found that at temperatures of 65, 67, 69, 71, and 75 degrees C, significantly (P < 0.05) higher exposure times were needed to achieve a 1-log reduction in virus titer in cream, as compared to skim and homogenized milk. For example, at 71 degrees C, a significantly (P < 0.05) higher exposure time of 0.52 min (for cream) was needed as compared to < or = 0.18 min (for skim and homogenized milk) to achieve a 1-log reduction in virus titer. A similar trend of inactivation was observed at 73 and 75 degrees C where significantly (P < 0.05) higher exposure times of 0.29 to 0.36 min for cream were needed to cause a 1-log reduction in HAV in cream, as compared to < or = 0.17 min for skim and homogenized milk. This study has provided information on the heat resistance of HAV in skim milk, homogenized milk, and table cream and demonstrated that an increase in fat content appears to play a protective role and contributes to the heat stability of HAV.
    Matched MeSH terms: Dairy Products/microbiology*
  3. Yap HY, Fung SY, Ng ST, Tan CS, Tan NH
    J Ethnopharmacol, 2015 Nov 4;174:437-51.
    PMID: 26320692 DOI: 10.1016/j.jep.2015.08.042
    The sclerotium of Lignosus rhinocerotis (Cooke) Ryvarden (tiger milk mushroom) has been traditionally used as a complementary and alternative medicine for cancer treatment by the local communities of Southeast Asia. Despite the continuous research interest in its antiproliferative activity, the identity of the bioactive compound(s) responsible has yet to be determined. This study aims to bridge the gap in existing research literature by using proteomics approach for investigation of the nature of the anticancer substance of L. rhinocerotis.
    Matched MeSH terms: Dairy Products
  4. Leong PC
    Matched MeSH terms: Dairy Products
  5. Leong PC
    Matched MeSH terms: Dairy Products
  6. Sirunyan AM, Tumasyan A, Adam W, Ambrogi F, Asilar E, Bergauer T, et al.
    Eur Phys J C Part Fields, 2019;79(7):564.
    PMID: 31397444 DOI: 10.1140/epjc/s10052-019-7058-z
    A search is presented for a heavy pseudoscalar boson
    A
    decaying to a Z  boson and a Higgs boson with mass of 125


    GeV

    . In the final state considered, the Higgs boson decays to a bottom quark and antiquark, and the Z  boson decays either into a pair of electrons, muons, or neutrinos. The analysis is performed using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35.9



    fb

    -
    1



    collected in 2016 by the CMS experiment at the LHC from proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 13



    Te



    . The data are found to be consistent with the background expectations. Exclusion limits are set in the context of two-Higgs-doublet models in the
    A
    boson mass range between 225 and 1000


    GeV

    .
    Matched MeSH terms: Dairy Products
  7. Sirunyan AM, Tumasyan A, Adam W, Ambrogi F, Bergauer T, Brandstetter J, et al.
    Phys. Rev. Lett., 2019 Sep 27;123(13):131802.
    PMID: 31697516 DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.123.131802
    A search for a light charged Higgs boson (H^{+}) decaying to a W boson and a CP-odd Higgs boson (A) in final states with eμμ or μμμ is performed using data from pp collisions at sqrt[s]=13  TeV, recorded by the CMS detector at the LHC and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35.9  fb^{-1}. In this search, it is assumed that the H^{+} boson is produced in decays of top quarks, and the A boson decays to two oppositely charged muons. The presence of signals for H^{+} boson masses between 100 and 160 GeV and A boson masses between 15 and 75 GeV is investigated. No evidence for the production of the H^{+} boson is found. Upper limits at 95% confidence level are obtained on the combined branching fraction for the decay chain, t→bH^{+}→bW^{+}A→bW^{+}μ^{+}μ^{-}, of 1.9×10^{-6} to 8.6×10^{-6}, depending on the masses of the H^{+} and A bosons. These are the first limits for these decay modes of the H^{+} and A bosons.
    Matched MeSH terms: Dairy Products
  8. Bao Khanh le N, Burgers MR, Huu Chinh N, Tuoc BV, Dinh Dung N, Deurenberg P, et al.
    Food Nutr Bull, 2016 Mar;37(1):100-11.
    PMID: 27004970 DOI: 10.1177/0379572116631642
    The traditional Vietnamese diet carries the risk of micronutrient deficiencies, and a substantial part of children <11 years do not meet the Vietnamese recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for a range of nutrients. Dairy products are known for their high nutrient density and milk in particular for its provision of high-quality protein and relevant concentrations of calcium, magnesium, vitamin B2, vitamin B12, and pantothenic acid.
    Matched MeSH terms: Dairy Products*
  9. Shokryzadan P, Rajion MA, Meng GY, Boo LJ, Ebrahimi M, Royan M, et al.
    Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr, 2017 Sep 02;57(13):2737-2748.
    PMID: 26252346 DOI: 10.1080/10408398.2015.1060190
    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a mixture of isomers of linoleic acid (C18:2 n-6), which is mostly found in the ruminant meat and dairy products. The CLA is known to have many potential health benefits, and considered a potent powerful fatty acid, which is linked to animal and human health. The present work aims to discuss the source and production, mechanism of action, and effects of CLA on humans, poultry, and ruminants by reviewing the recent studies carried out on CLA. Despite most of the recent studies indicating beneficial effects of CLA on improving body weight control parameters, its effects on reducing risk factors of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), inflammation, blood glucose, and insulin are still controversial, and need to be further studied in different hosts.
    Matched MeSH terms: Dairy Products/analysis*
  10. Teoh WL, Khoo MB, Teh SY
    PLoS ONE, 2013;8(7):e68580.
    PMID: 23935873 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0068580
    Designs of the double sampling (DS) X chart are traditionally based on the average run length (ARL) criterion. However, the shape of the run length distribution changes with the process mean shifts, ranging from highly skewed when the process is in-control to almost symmetric when the mean shift is large. Therefore, we show that the ARL is a complicated performance measure and that the median run length (MRL) is a more meaningful measure to depend on. This is because the MRL provides an intuitive and a fair representation of the central tendency, especially for the rightly skewed run length distribution. Since the DS X chart can effectively reduce the sample size without reducing the statistical efficiency, this paper proposes two optimal designs of the MRL-based DS X chart, for minimizing (i) the in-control average sample size (ASS) and (ii) both the in-control and out-of-control ASSs. Comparisons with the optimal MRL-based EWMA X and Shewhart X charts demonstrate the superiority of the proposed optimal MRL-based DS X chart, as the latter requires a smaller sample size on the average while maintaining the same detection speed as the two former charts. An example involving the added potassium sorbate in a yoghurt manufacturing process is used to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed MRL-based DS X chart in reducing the sample size needed.
    Matched MeSH terms: Dairy Products/analysis
  11. Sasidharan S, Prema B, Yoga LL
    Asian Pac J Trop Biomed, 2011 Apr;1(2):130-2.
    PMID: 23569742 DOI: 10.1016/S2221-1691(11)60010-5
    To evaluate the prevalence of multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) in dairy products.
    Matched MeSH terms: Dairy Products/microbiology*
  12. Simpson IA, Chow AY
    J Trop Pediatr (Lond), 1956 Jun;2(1):3-17.
    PMID: 24544028 DOI: 10.1093/oxfordjournals.tropej.a057405
    (1) The use of the thiochrome method for the estimation of thiamine in human milk is discussed, with special reference to the possible production of an artefact, following the incubation of the milk with pepsin, in addition to the use of takadiastase (clarase). No evidence could be found to suggest that an artefact resembling thiamine was produced by the method of analysis described.
    (2) The thiamine content of 91 samples of full lactation human milk from apparently "normal" Malay, Chinese and Indian women in Malaya is recorded. The mean milk thiamine level of 11.3 ug/100 ml. found is considerably lower than the levels recorded for milk samples from apparently "normal " women in the United Kingdom and the U.S.A.; and slightly lower than that recorded in Australia. The results suggest that the dietary
    intake of thiamine in Malaya is inadequate to maintain optimum thiamine levels in the milk of lactating women.
    (3) No significant difference was found in the mean thiamine content of milk from women of the three principal racial groups in Malaya ; nor was any significant difference found to be associated with the parity or age of the women or, in the case of full lactation milks, with the time after parturition at which the sample was collected. No significant difference was found in samples collected from the same woman at different times of the day or before and after a main meal.
    (4) Marked differences were found in the thiamine content of samples of milk from individual women, and the possible reasons for this are discussed.
    (5) The examfnation of 48 samples of milk collected during the first month after parturition confirmed previous recorded observations that the thiamine content of such milks, initially low, gradually increases to reach "normal" levels towards the end of the first month of lactation.
    Matched MeSH terms: Dairy Products*
  13. Md Zain SN, Bennett R, Flint S
    J. Food Sci., 2017 Mar;82(3):751-756.
    PMID: 28135405 DOI: 10.1111/1750-3841.13633
    The objective of this study was to determine the possible source of predominant Bacillus licheniformis contamination in a whey protein concentrate (WPC) 80 manufacturing plant. Traditionally, microbial contaminants of WPC were believed to grow on the membrane surfaces of the ultrafiltration plant as this represents the largest surface area in the plant. Changes from hot to cold ultrafiltration have reduced the growth potential for bacteria on the membrane surfaces. Our recent studies of WPCs have shown the predominant microflora B. licheniformis would not grow in the membrane plant because of the low temperature (10 °C) and must be growing elsewhere. Contamination of dairy products is mostly due to bacteria being released from biofilm in the processing plant rather from the farm itself. Three different reconstituted WPC media at 1%, 5%, and 20% were used for biofilm growth and our results showed that B. licheniformis formed the best biofilm at 1% (low solids). Further investigations were done using 3 different media; tryptic soy broth, 1% reconstituted WPC80, and 1% reconstituted WPC80 enriched with lactose and minerals to examine biofilm growth of B. licheniformis on stainless steel. Thirty-three B. licheniformis isolates varied in their ability to form biofilm on stainless steel with stronger biofilm in the presence of minerals. The source of biofilms of thermo-resistant bacteria such as B. licheniformis is believed to be before the ultrafiltration zone represented by the 1% WPC with lactose and minerals where the whey protein concentration is about 0.6%.
    Matched MeSH terms: Dairy Products/microbiology*
  14. Azimah, A., Azrina, A., Norhaizan, M.E., Mohd Sokhini, A.M., Daud, A.Z.
    MyJurnal
    This study was conducted to determine the major potential sources of industrially produced trans fatty acids (IP-TFAs) in Malaysian diet. Levels of IP-TFAs were initially determined in samples (n = 136) collected from 8 food groups (baked products, snacks, dairy products, breakfast cereals, fast foods, semisolid fats and cooking oils, and fried foods). A survey was carried out to 105 subjects aged 19-59 years old to determine the intake of IP-TFAs using Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ). The IP-TFAs range from 0-5.79% of food, with the highest found in semisolid fats and cooking oils (0.1-5.79%), followed by fast foods (0.04-0.86%), baked products (0.01-0.29%), breakfast cereals (0.06-0.45%), snacks (0.03-0.26%), dairy products (0-0.26%), and fried foods (0.002-0.06%). A Spearman’s Rho rank test showed that there were significant correlations (p < 0.05) between 4 of the food groups (semisolid fats and cooking oils, fast foods, fried foods, and baked products), with the total IP-TFA intakes of subjects. In general, total IP-TFAs intakes of subjects were < 1% of subjects' diet (0.067%-0.91% of subjects’ total calorie intakes). This indicate that high fat foods (semisolid fats and cooking oils, fast foods, fried foods, and baked products) were the main contributor of IP-TFAs in Malaysian diet, despite the low proportion of trans fatty acids, following their high frequency of daily intake.
    Matched MeSH terms: Dairy Products
  15. Sirunyan AM, Tumasyan A, Adam W, Ambrogi F, Asilar E, Bergauer T, et al.
    Eur Phys J C Part Fields, 2019;79(2):123.
    PMID: 30863200 DOI: 10.1140/epjc/s10052-019-6620-z
    Measurements of normalized differential cross sections as functions of the multiplicity and kinematic variables of charged-particle tracks from the underlying event in top quark and antiquark pair production are presented. The measurements are performed in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 13



    Te



    , and are based on data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC in 2016 corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35.9



    fb

    -
    1



    . Events containing one electron, one muon, and two jets from the hadronization and fragmentation of
    b
    quarks are used. These measurements characterize, for the first time, properties of the underlying event in top quark pair production and show no deviation from the universality hypothesis at energy scales typically above twice the top quark mass.
    Matched MeSH terms: Dairy Products
  16. Chin Yi Chan, Norazlina Mohamed, Soelaiman Ima-nirwana, Kok-yong Chin
    Sains Malaysiana, 2018;47:1801-1810.
    The prevalence of osteoporosis is increasing in Asian countries. Optimum calcium intake and vitamin D level are
    important to prevent osteoporosis. The attitude of the society towards calcium food sources and supplements, as well
    as sun exposure, influence their bone health practices. This review aimed to summarize the current literature on the
    attitude of Asians on calcium and vitamin D rich foods and supplements to understand the barriers among the Asians
    in achieving adequate calcium intake and vitamin D level. Studies showed that most Asians have a negative attitude
    towards calcium-rich foods, mainly dairy products due to lactose intolerance, aversion to the taste of dairy products or
    the absence of motivation. Although they took supplements to fill the gap in their diet, they were not aware of the daily
    recommended intake of calcium. Besides, the majority of them have a negative attitude towards sun exposure due to the
    fear of getting skin cancer or tanning. As a conclusion, most of Asians are still not aware of the importance of calcium
    and vitamin D for their health and their negative attitude must be corrected to prevent the rise of osteoporosis.
    Matched MeSH terms: Dairy Products
  17. Akmar ZD, Norhaizan ME, Azimah R, Azrina A, Chan YM
    Malays J Nutr, 2013 Apr;19(1):87-98.
    PMID: 24800387 MyJurnal
    INTRODUCTION: There is a lack of information on the trans fatty acid (TFA) content in Malaysian foods. The objective of this study is to determine the TFA content of bakery products, snacks, dairy products, fast foods, cooking oils and semisolid fats, and breakfast cereals and Malaysian fast foods. This study also estimated the quantity of each isomer in the foods assayed.
    METHODS: The trans fatty acid content of each food sample was assessed in duplicate by separating the fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) in a gas chromatography system equipped with HP-88 column (USA: split ratio 10: 1) for cis/trans separation. Five major TFA isomers, palmitoelaidic acid (16: 1t9), petroselaidic acid (18:1t6), elaidic acid (18:1t9), vaccenic acid (18: 1t11) and linoelaidic acid (18:2t9, 12), were measured using gas chromatography (GC) and the data were expressed in unit values of g/100 g lipid or g/100 g food.
    RESULTS: The total TFA contents in the studied foods were < 0.001 g-8.77 g/100 g lipid or < 0.001 g-5.79 g/100 g foods. This value falls within the standard and international recommendation level for TFA. The measured range of specific TFA isomers were as follows: palmitoelaidic acid (< 0.001 g-0.26 g/100 g lipid), petroselaidic acid (< 0.001 g - 3.09 g/100 g lipid), elaidic acid (< 0.001 g-0.87 g/100 g lipid), vaccenic acid (< 0.001 g-0.41 g/100 g lipid) and linoelaidic acid (< 0.001 g-6.60 g/100 g lipid).
    CONCLUSION: These data indicate that most of the tested foods have low TFA contents (< 1 g/100 g lipid).
    Matched MeSH terms: Dairy Products/analysis
  18. Mohd Redzwan S, Rosita J, Mohd Sokhini AM, Nurul Aqilah AR
    Bull Environ Contam Toxicol, 2012 Dec;89(6):1115-9.
    PMID: 23052590 DOI: 10.1007/s00128-012-0853-y
    This study aimed to find the association between urinary aflatoxin M(1) level and milk and dairy products consumption. Of 160 morning urine samples collected, aflatoxin M(1) was detected in 61.3 % samples (n = 98) [mean ± SD = 0.0234 ± 0.0177 ng/mL; range = 0-0.0747 ng/mL]. Of these positive samples, 67.3 % (n = 66) had levels above the limit of detection. Respondents with intake of milk and dairy products above median (67.79 g/day) had significantly high level of AFM(1) compared to those with low intake. A significant and positive association (φ = 0.286) was found between milk and dairy products consumption and urinary aflatoxin M(1) level.
    Matched MeSH terms: Dairy Products/statistics & numerical data*
  19. Shu PS, Chan YM, Huang SL
    PLoS ONE, 2017;12(2):e0172231.
    PMID: 28234927 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0172231
    This cross-sectional study was designed to determine factors contributing to glyceamic control in order to provide better understanding of diabetes management among Type 2 Diabetes patients. A pre-tested structured questionnaire was used to obtain information on socio-demographic and medical history. As a proxy measure for glycaemic control, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) was obtained as secondary data from the medical reports. Perceived self-care barrier on diabetes management, diet knowledge and skills, and diet quality were assessed using pretested instruments. With a response rate of 80.3%, 155 subjects were recruited for the study. Mean HbA1c level of the subjects was 9.02 ± 2.25% with more than 70% not able to achieve acceptable level in accordance to WHO recommendation. Diet quality of the subjects was unsatisfactory especially for vegetables, fruits, fish and legumes as well as from the milk and dairy products group. Higher body mass index (BMI), poorer medication compliance, lower diet knowledge and skill scores and lower intake of milk and dairy products contributed significantly on poor glycaemic control. In conclusion, while perceived self-care barriers and diet quality failed to predict HbA1c, good knowledge and skill ability, together with appropriate BMI and adequate intake of dairy products should be emphasized to optimize glycaemic control among type 2 diabetes patients.
    Matched MeSH terms: Dairy Products*
  20. Abbasiliasi S, Tan JS, Bashokouh F, Ibrahim TAT, Mustafa S, Vakhshiteh F, et al.
    BMC Microbiol., 2017 May 23;17(1):121.
    PMID: 28535747 DOI: 10.1186/s12866-017-1000-z
    BACKGROUND: Selection of a microbial strain for the incorporation into food products requires in vitro and in vivo evaluations. A bacteriocin-producing lactic acid bacterium (LAB), Pediococcus acidilactici Kp10, isolated from a traditional dried curd was assessed in vitro for its beneficial properties as a potential probiotic and starter culture. The inhibitory spectra of the bacterial strain against different gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, its cell surface hydrophobicity and resistance to phenol, its haemolytic, amylolytic and proteolytic activities, ability to produce acid and coagulate milk together with its enzymatic characteristics and adhesion property were all evaluated in vitro.

    RESULTS: P. acidilactici Kp10 was moderately tolerant to phenol and adhere to mammalian epithelial cells (Vero cells and ileal mucosal epithelium). The bacterium also exhibited antimicrobial activity against several gram-positive and gram-negative food-spoilage and food-borne pathogens such as Listeria monocytgenes ATCC 15313, Salmonella enterica ATCC 13311, Shigella sonnei ATCC 9290, Klebsiella oxytoca ATCC 13182, Enterobacter cloaca ATCC 35030 and Streptococcus pyogenes ATCC 12378. The absence of haemolytic activity and proteinase (trypsin) and the presence of a strong peptidase (leucine-arylamidase) and esterase-lipase (C4 and C8) were observed in this LAB strain. P. acidilactici Kp10 also produced acid, coagulated milk and has demonstrated proteolytic and amylolactic activities.

    CONCLUSION: The properties exhibited by P. acidilactici Kp10 suggested its potential application as probiotic and starter culture in the food industry.

    Matched MeSH terms: Dairy Products/microbiology
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