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  1. Suhaimi FW, Yusoff NH, Hassan R, Mansor SM, Navaratnam V, Müller CP, et al.
    Brain Res. Bull., 2016 09;126(Pt 1):29-40.
    PMID: 27018165 DOI: 10.1016/j.brainresbull.2016.03.015
    Kratom or its main alkaloid, mitragynine is derived from the plant Mitragyna speciosa Korth which is indigenous to Southeast Asian countries. This substance has become widely available in other countries like Europe and United States due to its opium- and coca-like effects. In this article, we have reviewed available reports on mitragynine and other M. speciosa extracts. M. speciosa has been proven to have a rewarding effect and is effective in alleviating the morphine and ethanol withdrawal effects. However, studies in human revealed that prolonged consumption of this plant led to dependence and tolerance while cessation caused a series of aversive withdrawal symptoms. Findings also showed that M. speciosa extracts possess antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory, anti-depressant, and muscle relaxant properties. Available evidence further supports the adverse effects of M. speciosa preparations, mitragynine on cognition. Pharmacological activities are mainly mediated via opioid receptors as well as neuronal Ca2+ channels, expression of cAMP and CREB protein and via descending monoaminergic system. Physicochemical properties of mitragynine have been documented which may further explain the variation in pharmacological responses. In summary, current researchs on its main indole alkaloid, mitragynine suggest both therapeutic and addictive potential but further research on its molecular effects is needed.
    Matched MeSH terms: Receptors, Opioid/metabolism
  2. Zakaria ZA, Mustapha S, Sulaiman MR, Mat Jais AM, Somchit MN, Abdullah FC
    Med Princ Pract, 2007;16(2):130-6.
    PMID: 17303949
    The present study was carried out to investigate the antinociceptive activity of the aqueous extract of Muntingia calabura (MCAE) leaves and to determine the effect of temperature and the involvement of the opioid receptor on the said activity using the abdominal constriction test (ACT) and hot-plate test (HPT) in mice.
    Matched MeSH terms: Receptors, Opioid/metabolism*
  3. Zakaria ZA, Abdul Rahim MH, Mohd Sani MH, Omar MH, Ching SM, Abdul Kadir A, et al.
    BMC Complement Altern Med, 2019 Apr 02;19(1):79.
    PMID: 30940120 DOI: 10.1186/s12906-019-2486-8
    BACKGROUND: Methanol extract (MECN) of Clinacanthus nutans Lindau leaves (family Acanthaceae) demonstrated peripherally and centrally mediated antinociceptive activity via the modulation of opioid/NO-mediated, but cGMP-independent pathway. In the present study, MECN was sequentially partitioned to obtain petroleum ether extract of C. nutans (PECN), which was subjected to antinociceptive study with aims of establishing its antinociceptive potential and determining the role of opioid receptors and L-arginine/nitric oxide/cyclic-guanosine monophosphate (L-arg/NO/cGMP) pathway in the observed antinociceptive activity.

    METHODS: The antinociceptive potential of orally administered PECN (100, 250, 500 mg/kg) was studied using the abdominal constriction-, hot plate- and formalin-induced paw licking-test in mice (n = 6). The effect of PECN on locomotor activity was also evaluated using the rota rod assay. The role of opioid receptors was determined by pre-challenging 500 mg/kg PECN (p.o.) with antagonist of opioid receptor subtypes, namely β-funaltrexamine (β-FNA; 10 mg/kg; a μ-opioid antagonist), naltrindole (NALT; 1 mg/kg; a δ-opioid antagonist) or nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI; 1 mg/kg; a κ-opioid antagonist) followed by subjection to the abdominal constriction test. In addition, the role of L-arg/NO/cGMP pathway was determined by prechallenging 500 mg/kg PECN (p.o.) with L-arg (20 mg/kg; a NO precursor), 1H-[1, 2, 4] oxadiazolo [4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ; 2 mg/kg; a specific soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor), or the combinations thereof (L-arg + ODQ) for 5 mins before subjection to the abdominal constriction test. PECN was also subjected to phytoconstituents analyses.

    RESULTS: PECN significantly (p  0.05) affect the locomotor activity of treated mice. The antinociceptive activity of PECN was significantly (p opioid receptors. In addition, the antinociceptive activity of PECN was significantly (p  0.05) affected by ODQ. HPLC analysis revealed the presence of at least cinnamic acid in PECN.

    CONCLUSION: PECN exerted antinocicpetive activity at peripheral and central levels possibly via the activation of non-selective opioid receptors and modulation of the NO-mediated/cGMP-independent pathway partly via the synergistic action of phenolic compounds.

    Matched MeSH terms: Receptors, Opioid/metabolism
  4. Shamima AR, Fakurazi S, Hidayat MT, Hairuszah I, Moklas MA, Arulselvan P
    Int J Mol Sci, 2012;13(9):11427-42.
    PMID: 23109863 DOI: 10.3390/ijms130911427
    Cannabinoids and opioids systems share numerous pharmacological properties and antinociception is one of them. Previous findings have shown that mitragynine (MG), a major indole alkaloid found in Mitragyna speciosa (MS) can exert its antinociceptive effects through the opioids system. In the present study, the action of MG was investigated as the antinociceptive agent acting on Cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and effects on the opioids receptor. The latency time was recorded until the mice showed pain responses such as shaking, licking or jumping and the duration of latency was measured for 2 h at every 15 min interval by hot plate analysis. To investigate the beneficial effects of MG as antinociceptive agent, it was administered intraperitoneally 15 min prior to pain induction with a single dosage (3, 10, 15, 30, and 35 mg/kg b.wt). In this investigation, 35 mg/kg of MG showed significant increase in the latency time and this dosage was used in the antagonist receptor study. The treated groups were administered with AM251 (cannabinoid receptor-1 antagonist), naloxone (non-selective opioid antagonist), naltrindole (δ-opioid antagonist) naloxonazine (μ(1)-receptor antagonist) and norbinaltorpimine (κ-opioid antagonist) respectively, prior to administration of MG (35 mg/kg). The results showed that the antinociceptive effect of MG was not antagonized by AM251; naloxone and naltrindole were effectively blocked; and norbinaltorpimine partially blocked the antinociceptive effect of MG. Naloxonazine did inhibit the effect of MG, but it was not statistically significant. These results demonstrate that CB1 does not directly have a role in the antinociceptive action of MG where the effect was observed with the activation of opioid receptor.
    Matched MeSH terms: Receptors, Opioid/metabolism*
  5. Zakaria ZA, Sani MH, Mohammat MF, Mansor NS, Shaameri Z, Kek TL, et al.
    Can. J. Physiol. Pharmacol., 2013 Dec;91(12):1143-53.
    PMID: 24289087 DOI: 10.1139/cjpp-2013-0099
    This study was carried out to determine the antinociceptive activity of a novel synthetic oxopyrrolidine-based compound, (2R,3R,4S)-ethyl 4-hydroxy-1,2-dimethyl-5-oxopyrrolidine-3-carboxylate (ASH21374), and to elucidate the involvement of the opioid, vanilloid, glutamate, and nitric oxide - cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO/cGMP) systems in modulating the observed antinociception. ASH21374, in the doses of 2, 10, and 100 mg/kg body mass, was administered orally to mice 60 mins prior to exposure to various antinociceptive assays. From the results obtained, ASH21374 exhibited significant (P < 0.05) antinociceptive activity in the abdominal constriction, hot-plate, and formalin tests that was comparable with 100 mg/kg acetylsalicylic acid or 5 mg/kg morphine, respectively. ASH21374 also attenuated capsaicin- and glutamate-induced paw licking. Pre-treatment with 5 mg/kg naloxone significantly (P < 0.05) inhibited the activity in all assays, while pretreatment with 10 mg/kg β-funaltraxamine, 1 mg/kg naltrindole, or 1 mg/kg nor-binaltorphimine significantly (P < 0.05) reversed the activity in the abdominal constriction test. l-Arginine, N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl esters (l-NAME), methylene blue, and their combinations, failed to inhibit the ASH21374 antinociceptive activity. In conclusion, ASH21374 demonstrated antinociceptive activities on the peripheral and central nervous systems, mediated through the activation of opioid receptors, inhibition of the glutamatergic system, and attenuation of vanilloid-mediated nociceptive transmission. Further studies have been planned to determine the pharmacological potential of ASH21374.
    Matched MeSH terms: Receptors, Opioid/metabolism
  6. Ping CP, Tengku Mohamad TAS, Akhtar MN, Perimal EK, Akira A, Israf Ali DA, et al.
    Molecules, 2018 Sep 03;23(9).
    PMID: 30177603 DOI: 10.3390/molecules23092237
    Pain is one of the most common cause for hospital visits. It plays an important role in inflammation and serves as a warning sign to avoid further injury. Analgesics are used to manage pain and provide comfort to patients. However, prolonged usage of pain treatments like opioids and NSAIDs are accompanied with undesirable side effects. Therefore, research to identify novel compounds that produce analgesia with lesser side effects are necessary. The present study investigated the antinociceptive potentials of a natural compound, cardamonin, isolated from Boesenbergia rotunda (L) Mansf. using chemical and thermal models of nociception. Our findings showed that intraperitoneal and oral administration of cardamonin (0.3, 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg) produced significant and dose-dependent inhibition of pain in abdominal writhing responses induced by acetic acid. The present study also demonstrated that cardamonin produced significant analgesia in formalin-, capsaicin-, and glutamate-induced paw licking tests. In the thermal-induced nociception model, cardamonin exhibited significant increase in response latency time of animals subjected to hot-plate thermal stimuli. The rota-rod assessment confirmed that the antinociceptive activities elicited by cardamonin was not related to muscle relaxant or sedative effects of the compound. In conclusion, the present findings showed that cardamonin exerted significant peripheral and central antinociception through chemical- and thermal-induced nociception in mice through the involvement of TRPV₁, glutamate, and opioid receptors.
    Matched MeSH terms: Receptors, Opioid/metabolism*
  7. Sulaiman MR, Zakaria ZA, Adilius M, Mohamad AS, Ismail M, Israf DA
    Methods Find Exp Clin Pharmacol, 2009 May;31(4):241-7.
    PMID: 19557202 DOI: 10.1358/mf.2009.31.4.1371198
    The ethanolic extract of Alpinia conchigera Griff. leaves (EACL) was evaluated for its antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities in several in vivo experimental models. Antinociceptive activity was determined using the acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing test, the hot plate test and the formalin test. Anti-inflammatory activity was determined using the carrageenan-induced paw edema test. The extract (30, 100 and 300 mg/kg i.p.) was found to possess significant, dose-dependent inhibitory activity in all test models. In addition, the antinociceptive effect of the extract in the acetic acid-induced writhing and hot plate tests was reversed by naloxone, suggesting that this activity is mediated through activation of the opioid system. These findings suggest that EACL presents notable analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities, which support its folkloric use for painful and inflammatory conditions.
    Matched MeSH terms: Receptors, Opioid/metabolism
  8. Sulaiman MR, Tengku Mohamad TA, Shaik Mossadeq WM, Moin S, Yusof M, Mokhtar AF, et al.
    Planta Med., 2010 Feb;76(2):107-12.
    PMID: 19637111 DOI: 10.1055/s-0029-1185950
    In the present study, the rhizome essential oil from Zingiber zerumbet (Zingiberaceae) was evaluated for antinociceptive activity using chemical and thermal models of nociception, namely, the acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing test, the hot-plate test and the formalin-induced paw licking test. It was demonstrated that intraperitoneal administration of the essential oil of Z. zerumbet (EOZZ) at the doses of 30, 100 and 300 mg/kg produced significant dose-dependent inhibition of acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing, comparable to that of obtained with acetylsalicylic acid (100 mg/kg). At the same doses, the EOZZ produced significant dose-dependent increases in the latency time in the hot-plate test with respect to controls, and in the formalin-induced paw licking test, the EOZZ also significantly reduced the painful stimulus in both neurogenic and inflammatory phase of the test. In addition, the antinociceptive effect of the EOZZ in the formalin-induced paw licking test as well as hot-plate test was reversed by the nonselective opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone suggesting that the opioid system was involved in its analgesic mechanism of action. On the basis of these data, we concluded that the EOZZ possessed both central and peripheral antinociceptive activities which justifying its popular folkloric use to relieve some pain conditions.
    Matched MeSH terms: Receptors, Opioid/metabolism
  9. Zakaria ZA, Mohd Sani MH, Cheema MS, Kader AA, Kek TL, Salleh MZ
    PMID: 24555641 DOI: 10.1186/1472-6882-14-63
    Muntingia calabura (Elaecoparceae) is a medicinal plant traditionally used, particularly, by the Peruvian people to alleviate headache and cold, pain associated with gastric ulcers or to reduce the prostate gland swelling. Following the recent establishment of antinociceptive activity of M. calabura leaf, the present study was performed to further elucidate on the possible mechanisms of antinociception involved.
    Matched MeSH terms: Receptors, Opioid/metabolism
  10. Yusoff NHM, Mansor SM, Müller CP, Hassan Z
    Behav. Brain Res., 2017 08 14;332:1-6.
    PMID: 28559179 DOI: 10.1016/j.bbr.2017.05.059
    Mitragynine is the main psychoactive ingredient of the herbal drug preparation Kratom (Ketum), derived from the plant Mitragyna speciosa. Kratom is a widely abused drug in Southeast Asian and has a psychostimulant profile at low-medium doses, while high doses have opioidergic effects. Mitragynine was shown to possess opiate receptor affinity. However, its role in the behavioural effects of mitragynine is unclear. Here we asked whether the reinforcing effects of mitragynine are mediated by opiate receptors using a conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm in rats. In the first experiment we tested the effects of the opiate receptor antagonist naloxone (0.1, 0.3 and 1.0mg/kg) on the acquisition of mitragynine (10mg/kg)-induced CPP. In the second experiment, we tested the involvement of opiate receptors in the expression of mitragynine-induced CPP in rats. We found that naloxone suppresses the acquisition of mitragynine-induced CPP. This effect was already evident at a dose of naloxone (0.1mg/kg) which, by itself, had no conditioned place aversion (CPA) effect. Higher doses of naloxone induced a CPA and blocked mitragynine-induced CPP. In contrast, naloxone had no effect on the expression of mitragynine-induced CPP. These findings suggest that the acquisition, but not the expression of the reinforcing effects of mitragynine is mediated by opiate receptors.
    Matched MeSH terms: Receptors, Opioid/metabolism*
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